20 American Revolution & War of 1812 Veterans – Parkman, Koiner, Keinadt, Barger, Darst, Converse, Flora, Brownlee, Baldwin, Phelps, Belcher, Coolidge, Bradford, Pickens, Ancestors

american-revolution-patriot-marching-w-13-stars-and-stripes-flag

minuteman concord statue

s-l400

George Washington’s Prayer at Valley Forge by Arnold Freiberg.

SC168397

George Washington at Dorchester Heights (Boston) commissioned by Samuel Parkman painted by Gilbert Stuart original at Boston Museum of Fine Arts and copy at Fanueil Hall.

13615058_1726501144289598_4852812987029983198_n

american revolution soldier 4.jpg

minuteman statue

american revolution soldier 5.jpg

american revolution soldier 2.jpg

american revolution soldier 3.jpg

american-revolution-patriot-marching-w-13-stars-and-stripes-flag

sarcoin-2

SAR – Sons of the American Revolution (bronze round)

mel-gibson-patriot-2

mel-gibson-patriot-dvd

  1. Lieutenant Alexander Parkman

This grave of Alexander & Kezia Parkman is @ the Old Westmoreland Cemetery, Oneida County, NY.

This inactive cemetery is located off Rte. 233, behind the Post Office in Westmoreland. Many of the stones are badly worn but the cemetery is very well maintained. File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by:
Kathy Last kllast@juno.com May 2, 2009, 7:37 pm

http://www.usgwarchives.net/ny/oneida/photos/tombstones/oldwestmoreland/parkman7003gph.jpg/a>

Birth: Jan. 15, 1747
Westborough
Worcester County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Apr. 1, 1828
Westmoreland
Oneida County
New York, USA

Inscription:
Lieut. In Revolutionary War, age 81 yrs

Burial:
Old Westmoreland Cemetery
Westmoreland
Oneida County
New York, USA

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=20630653

Alexander Parkman’s Pedigree & Family link:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027883&familyTreeID=2#

Alexander Parkman, Esq., Lieut., Revolution, born 1747, died April 4, 1828, aged 81.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~coyne2010/westmoreland.html

Parkman, Alexander, Lieut. in Revolutionary War, died April 1, 1828 age 81 yrs
 Parkman, Kezia, wife of Alexander Parkman, died Nov. 15, 1816 age 64 yrs
 Parkman, Lydia, dau of Alexander & Kezia Parkman, died Dec. 21, 1850 age 75 yrs 6 mos
 Parkman, Polly, dau of Alexander & Kezia Parkman, died Feb. 16, 1851 age 71 yrs

http://oneida.nygenweb.net/

Alexander Parkman & Kezia Brown’s 8 children:

http://www.mytrees.com/ancestry-family/th001467-6135.html

Sons of the American Revolution:

http://www.SAR.org

http://patriot.sar.org/fmi/iwp/cgi?-db=Grave%20Registry&-loadframes/a>

William Parkman Collection

(includes letters from Alexander, Samuel & William Parkman):

http://www.concordlibrary.org/scollect/Fin_Aids/parkman.html

Lydia Parkman duaghter of Alexander and Kezia Parkman

Lydia Parkman daughter of Alexander and Kezia Parkman

Polly Parkman daughter of Alexander and Kezia Parkman

Polly Parkman daughter of Alexander and Kezia Parkman

http://www.usgwarchives.net/ny/tsphoto/oneida/oldwestmoreland.htm

*******************

Alexander Parkman

Birthdate: February 17, 1746
Birthplace: Westborough, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died April 1, 1826
Immediate Family: Son of Rev. Ebenezer Parkman and Hannah Parkman
Husband of Kezia Brown
Father of Lucy Parkman
Brother of Elizabeth Parkman; William Parkman;Sarah Parkman; Susannah Parkman; Breck Parkman; Samuel Parkman; John Parkman; Anna Sophia Brigham; Hannah Parkman; Elias Parkmanand Robert Breck Parkman « less
Half brother of Mary Forbes; Sgt. Ebenezer Parkman;Thomas Parkman; Lydia Parkman and Lucy Forbes

https://www.geni.com/people/Alexander-Parkman/6000000007803859641

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2028133&familyTreeID=2

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/person/290024880516/family

***************

2. Gideon Parkman

Gideon Parkman Revolutionary war Patriot headstone.jpg

Gideon Parkman Revolutionary War Patriot 1714 1789 DAR Maine.jpg

Gideon Parkman Revolutionary War Patriot – 1714-1789:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=137344667

**********************

3. Kasper Koiner

Kasper Koiner 1.jpg

Kasper Koiner 1764-1856 Private in the American Revolution

Kasper Koiner 2

michael-keinadt-koiner-1

Birth: Sep. 25, 1764
Millersville
Lancaster County
Pennsylvania, USA
Death: Oct. 31, 1856
Augusta County
Virginia, USA

Kasper was a veteran and served as a Private during the Revolutionary War. He was the son of Michael and Margaret Keinadt and was 92 years and 36 days old when he died.
Kasper married Anna Margaret Barger, the daughter of Jacob Berger/Barger. Kasper met Anna Margaret on a trip to Virginia. They did not know each other long and her father was opposed to the marriage so the 2 young people eloped to Staunton VA. However, in time, Jacob’s opposition was resolved. Kasper and Anna Margaret had 11 children.Family links:
Parents:
Michael Keinadt (1720 – 1796)
Margaret Diller Keinadt (1734 – 1813)Spouse:
Anna Margaret Barger Coiner (1771 – 1850)*Children:
Jacob Coyner (1789 – 1874)*
Michael Coiner (1790 – 1864)*
John Koiner (1792 – 1852)*
Philip Koiner (1794 – 1872)*
David C. Coiner (1796 – 1880)*
Mary Koiner Koiner (1798 – 1868)*
Samuel Coiner (1802 – 1871)*
Martin Coyner (1804 – 1883)*
Simon Coiner (1806 – 1897)*
Benjamin Coiner (1808 – 1868)*
Susan C. Koiner Henkel (1810 – 1905)*Siblings:
George Adam Koiner (1753 – 1820)*
George Michael Koiner (1758 – 1840)*
Mary Coiner Hattabaugh (1762 – ____)*
Kasper Koiner (1764 – 1856)
Catherine Coiner Slagle (1766 – 1855)*
John Coyner (1768 – 1852)*
Martin Luther Coyner (1771 – 1842)*
Jacob Coyner (1772 – 1826)*
Philip Koiner (1776 – 1849)**Calculated relationshipInscription:”I know that my Redeemer liveth and that He shall stand at the latter day upon the earth. And though after my skin worms destroy this body yet in my flesh shall I see God. Whom I shall see for myself and mine eyes shall behold.”
Burial:
Trinity Lutheran Church Cemetery
Crimora
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Sq 16 R 4 #3
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Zachary Coiner
Originally Created by: Joan
Record added: Aug 20, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21037294

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=21037294

Kasper Koiner’s Pedigree and Family Group link:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027906&familyTreeID=2

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/person/290024880556/family

**********************

George Washington Gilbert Stuart Samuel Parkman Boston Museum of fine Arts

George Washington Samuel Parkman Gilbert Stuart BMFA Feb 2015 D952

Samuel Parkman commissioned Gilbert Stuart to paint a full length oil portrait of U.S. President George Washington, which Samuel later gifted to the Town of Boston on the 30th anniversary of the signing of The Declaration of Independence on the 4th of July 1806 where the painting hung in the Faneuil Hall and now in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. The painting by Gilbert Stuart is of George Washington ,in Dorchester Heights, full-length in uniform, standing by a white horse, holding his bridle in his left hand and his chapeau in his right.

https://parkmangenealogy.wordpress.com/2010/01/02/parkman-samuel-u-s-president-george-washington-boston-museum-of-fine-arts/

*********************

4. Jacob Barger

Jacob Barger (Berger), He was drafted and served as body guard to George Washington in the Revolutionary war. He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War and a Private serving under the direct command of George Washington during a time of great destitution and starvation:

Jacob Berger (Barger) 1

Jacob Berger (Barger) 2

michael-keinadt-koiner-1

Birth: Oct. 27, 1745Death: Aug. 27, 1794
Jacob is referred to as the patriarch of Trinity Congregation. He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War and a Private serving under the direct command of George Washington during a time of great destitution and starvation. He at first lived in Rockingham County but after the war he and his wife Elizabeth Hedrick moved to Augusta County. He was only 49 years old when he died.

Family links:
Spouse:
Elizabeth Hedrick Barger (1752 – 1841)*

Children:
Anna Margaret Barger Coiner (1771 – 1850)*
Elizabeth Eggel (1777 – 1816)*
John Barger (1794 – 1845)*

*Calculated relationship

Inscription:
Inscription on the gravestone at the right is written in German and reads:

“Here lies our loved one Jacob Berger who was born on the 27th day of October 1745 and died on the 27th day of August 1794. He was 48 years 2 months and a day old”
“Ye passers-by consider well here my place; seek Jesus in the time of grace that ye may hereafter come to glory”.

Burial:
Trinity Lutheran Church Cemetery
Crimora
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Square 30
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Zachary Coiner
Originally Created by: Joan
Record added: Jul 29, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 20682690

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=20682690

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2028133&familyTreeID=2

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/person/290024880558/family

******************

Jacob Berrier Barger, Sr.:

Birth: Oct. 26, 1745
McGaheysville
Rockingham County
Virginia, USADeath: Aug. 24, 1794
New Hope
Augusta County
Virginia, USA

Wife – Elizabeth /Hedrick/

Father – Casper Barger
Mother – Margaret

When Jacob returned from the Revolutionary War they moved from Rockingham County to Augusta County. Their first child, Anna Margaret, was baptized on April 6, 1772 and was the first recorded entry in the records of Trinity Lutheran Church.

Pam and Steven Bennet (#47208550)
Their suggestion:
————————-
Jacob Barger was born in 1745, married Elizabeth Hedrick in 1772.

He was drafted and served as body guard to George Washington in the Revolutionary war.

He took a deep interest in the matters pertaining to his church and was the patriarch of the Lutheran Church at Koiners Store, Rockingham County, Virginia. He was engaged in the congregations work of building the first church structure there. When he was stricken with paralysis and died at the age of 49. The church still in use, has services once a yer with special occasions and weddings held in it. The pipe organ still in use was brought in over the mountains by ox cart from PA. The homestead, slave house and buildings are still standing and in use.

Please add this to my G Grandfather’s bio

Steve

And Larry #48886082
————————-

Family links:
Parents:
Casper Barger (1708 – 1755)

Spouse:
Elizabeth Hedrick Barger (1752 – 1841)

Sibling:
Philip Barger (1741 – 1803)*
Jacob Berrier Barger (1745 – 1794)

*Calculated relationship
Burial:
Trinity Lutheran Church Cemetery
Crimora
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Barbara Anne (Brownell) …
Record added: Mar 14, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 86738611

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=86738611

Jacob Barger’s Pedigree and Family Group link:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027906&familyTreeID=2

******************************

5. Michael Keinadt

Michael Keinadt (Koiner) 1

Michael Keinadt (Koiner) 2.jpg

Michael Keinadt (Koiner) 3.jpg

Michael Keinadt (Koiner) 4

Birth: Jan. 29, 1720, Germany
Death: Nov. 7, 1796
Augusta County
Virginia, USA

Michael was born at Winterlingen Germany. He emegrated to America about 1740 and to Virginia in 1790. He was 77 years old when he died.
Michael was also a Revolutionary War soldier in Pennsylvania. He served as a Private. The Revolutionary War marker was placed by the Col. James Patton chapter of the DAR.
Inscription is written in German;
Er liegt der leib of (Micael Keinadt) Gastorben den 7 Nofember 1796 seiner alter Vahr 77 jahr.
Tue her vorieben gehet ach betrachtet meines tet
Sehet usum spet und frieh—–.
Translation; Here lies our loved one Michael Keinadt who died the 7th of November in his 77th year—-Family links:
Spouse:
Margaret Diller Keinadt (1734 – 1813)Children:
George Adam Koiner (1753 – 1820)*
George Michael Koiner (1758 – 1840)*
Mary Coiner Hattabaugh (1762 – ____)*
Kasper Koiner (1764 – 1856)*
Catherine Coiner Slagle (1766 – 1855)*
John Coyner (1768 – 1852)*
Martin Luther Coyner (1771 – 1842)*
Jacob Coyner (1772 – 1826)*
Philip Koiner (1776 – 1849)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Trinity Lutheran Church Cemetery
Crimora
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Sq 30 R4 #30
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Zachary Coiner
Originally Created by: Joan
Record added: Jul 29, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 20686404

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=20686404

Michael Keinadt’s Pedigree and Family Group:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027910&familyTreeID=2

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/person/290024880560/family

***********************

6. Benjamin Darst:

Benjamin Darst 1.jpg

Benjamin Darst 2.jpg

Birth: Jan. 18, 1760
Death: Oct. 6, 1835

The link to Benjamin’s immigrant father was provided by Robert V Darst.On 18 April 2010, Michael Bogoslawskiprovided the following information;The Darst family came to the Valley from Switzerland via Pennsylvania.
Benjamin Darst, Sr. (1760-1835) was an influential member of the community, whose skills including pottery making, brick making, and construction.Family links:
Parents:
Abraham Derst (1725 – 1772)Spouses:
Lucy Woodward Darst (1758 – 1794)*
Sarah Lewis Darst (1755 – 1827)*
Hannah Kean Darst (____ – 1864)*Children:
John Darst (1784 – 1835)*
Benjamin Darst (1785 – 1821)*
Samuel L. Darst (1788 – 1864)*
Daniel Darst (1790 – ____)*Siblings:
Abraham Darst (1745 – 1822)*
Jacob Durst (1754 – 1814)*
Samuel Darst (1754 – 1791)*
David Darst (1757 – 1826)*
Benjamin Darst (1760 – 1835)
Paul Darst (1762 – 1826)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery
Lexington
Lexington City
Virginia, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Mike
Record added: Sep 09, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 15676859

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15676859

Benjamin Darst’s Pedigree and Family Group:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2031215&familyTreeID=2

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/person/290024883865/family

*******************

7. Captain Israel Converse:

Israel Converse Capt American Revolution

Birth: Aug. 7, 1743
Stafford
Tolland County
Connecticut, USA
Death: Mar. 28, 1806
Randolph
Orange County
Vermont, USA

One of the founding fathers of the Town of Randolph, Orange, VT. The son of Josiah Converse and Eleanor Richardson of Stafford, CT. First married Sarah Lewis in Stafford 29 Aug 1765. She died 16 June 1769 in Stafford. Second marriage to Hannah Walbridge b. 13 Oct 1751 and died 17 Oct 1830 in Parkman, Ohio. They were married 27 June 1771.Marched to the relief of Boston in the Lexington Alarm of April 19, 1775; later commissioned a captain and served in Colonel Well’s regiment; a chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution is known as the Colonel Israel Converse Chapter of Randolph, Vermont.Family links:
Parents:
Josiah Converse (1710 – 1775)
Elener Richardson Converse (1714 – 1785)Spouse:
Hannah Walbridge Converse (1751 – 1830)Children:
Shubel Converse (1766 – 1823)*
Frederick Converse (1768 – 1828)*
Israel Converse (1772 – 1773)*
Israel Converse (1773 – 1827)*
Porter Converse (1778 – 1870)*
Sarah Lewis Converse (1780 – 1858)*
Celia Converse York (1783 – 1840)*
Eleanor Converse Scott (1787 – 1865)*
Daniel G Converse (1790 – 1858)*
John Phelps Converse (1792 – 1865)*
Josiah Converse (1797 – 1817)*Siblings:
Josiah Converse (____ – 1814)*
Israel Converse (1743 – 1806)
Joseph Converse (1754 – 1826)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Randolph Center Cemetery
Randolph
Orange County
Vermont, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Bill DeFlorio
Record added: Jan 24, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 104103599

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=104103599

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2028133&familyTreeID=2

http://person.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/person/290036525385/facts

****************

8. Lieutenant Josiah Converse:

Lieu. Josiah Converse died Sept. 11, 1775 in the 65 year of His age. Stone is split and buried somewhat to keep pieces together. Converse Family is well known in Stafford’s history.

Josiah Converse Lieutenant American Revolution.jpg

Birth: Mar. 2, 1710
Woburn
Middlesex County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Sep. 11, 1775
Stratford
Fairfield County
Connecticut, USA

Family links:
Spouse:
Elener Richardson Converse (1714 – 1785)*

Children:
Josiah Converse (____ – 1814)*
Israel Converse (1743 – 1806)*
Joseph Converse (1754 – 1826)*

*Calculated relationship

Note: Age 65

Burial:
Old Stafford Street Cemetery
Stafford
Tolland County
Connecticut, USA
Plot:
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Barbara Barber
Record added: Aug 18, 2002
Find A Grave Memorial# 6696022

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6696022

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2028133&familyTreeID=2

http://person.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/person/290036873642/facts

****************************

9. Captain Josiah Converse:

Josiah Converse Captain American Revolution 1

Birth: unknown
Death: Oct. 25, 1814

Converse, Captain Josiah, died Oct. 25, 1814, age 78 yrs. (Revolutionary War Marker)Family links:
Parents:
Josiah Converse (1710 – 1775)
Elener Richardson Converse (1714 – 1785)Spouse:
Elizabeth Lewis Converse (____ – 1815)Siblings:
Josiah Converse (____ – 1814)
Israel Converse (1743 – 1806)*
Joseph Converse (1754 – 1826)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Stafford Street Cemetery
Stafford
Tolland County
Connecticut, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Linda Mac
Record added: Mar 01, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 86056172

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=86056172

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2028133&familyTreeID=2

http://person.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/person/290036877475/facts

***************

10. John Flora (Florey), American Revolution Veteran:

John Flora American Rev.jpg

john-flora-military-service-aft-1760-revolutionary-war-6th-class-private-8th-co-5th-battalion-northampton-co-pa

john-flora-3

john-flora-4

Birth: Apr. 7, 1760
Montgomery County
Pennsylvania, USA
Death: Jul. 18, 1850
Decatur
Macon County
Illinois, USA

EARLY SETTLERS OF MACON COUNTY ILLINOIS
In 1829 came John Flora and wife, Mary Ott, with their family to Illinois, reach his destination in the latter part of December. He moved his family and effects in four wagons drawn by horses, and at length reached John’s Hill. Decatur had just been laid out, and Springfield was a market at that time. Mr. Flora entered the land from the Government, and in a log cabin the family lived in true pioneer style, dressing in buckskin and wearing coonskin caps. Their beds were made of poles inserted between the logs, and clapboards were placed up these. There were thirteen children in the family, hence the household was a large one. In Virginia the father owned a saw and grist mill, but after coming to the West he carried on agricultural pursuits. He became well-to-do, and, although he had served in the Revolutionary War and was granted a pension, he would never draw the money.
Name: John FLORA
· Sex: M
· Birth: 7 APR 1760 in Pennsylvania
· Death: 18 JUL 1850 in Macon County, IL
· Burial: AFT 18 JUL 1850 Florey Cemetery, Macon Co., IL
· Occupation: AFT 1760 Farmer
· Military Service: AFT 1760 Revolutionary War: 6th class private, 8th Co., 5th Battalion, Northampton Co., PA
· Emigration: ABT 1787 To Botebourt Co., VA
· Emigration: 1791 Wythe Co., VA
· Emigration: 1829 To Macon Co., ILAbstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots
Name: John Florey
Cemetery: Old Family Cemetery
LOCATION: Long Creek, Macon CO IL 71
Reference: Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Vol.2, p. Serial: 12978; Volume: 2Family links:
Spouse:
Mary Ott Flora (1781 – 1861)*Children:
George G. Flora (1786 – 1858)*
Adam Flora (1792 – 1849)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Florey Cemetery
Long Creek
Macon County
Illinois, USA
Created by: Anita Epperson
Record added: Sep 07, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 41694066

http://person.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/person/290028748800/facts

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=41694066

*****************

joseph brownlee lieutenant american revolution 1.jpg

joseph-brownlee-lieutenant-american-revolution-2

11. Lieutenant Joseph Brownlee:

Birth: unknown, USA
Death: Jul. 13, 1782
Hannastown
Westmoreland County
Pennsylvania, USA

Joseph Brownlee was the first husband of Elizabeth Guthrie. He served during the Revolutionary War with Capt. Joseph Ervin’s Company which was raised in Westmoreland Cty. Pa. He made 3rd Lt. on April 15, 1776, 2nd Lt. on Oct. 24, 1776 and 1st Lt. on April 18, 1777. He was captured at the battle of Long Island on July 27, 1776 and released in a prisoner exchange Dec. 9, 1776. He resigned on June 22, 1777. He married Elizabeth Guthrie in 1775 and they had two children, John & Jane. Joseph was an Indian fighter on the frontier. On July 13, 1782, while attending a wedding at Miller’s Blockhouse at Hannastown, Indians attacked. They burned Hannastown and took captives. When learning of Joseph’s idenity, they killed him with a hatchet blow to the head. His 3-year-old son John was killed as the Indians slammed his head to a tree. The others in the party were taken captive as was his daughter Jane, who was only 4-months old at the time. His wife Elizabeth was taken as well. (SEE THE PAGE FOR ELIZABETH GUTHRIE FOR DETAILS OF HER CAPTURE).Elizabeth Guthrie was the wife of Capt. William Guthrie. They had 10-children. Elizabeth Guthrie gave an account of the burning of Hannastown on July 13, 1782 and her experiences as a captive of the Indians in her petition to the Pennsylvania State Legislature. Elizabeth was the daughter of John Guthrie & Jane Reed. Before her marriage to Capt. William Guthrie, she was married to Capt. Joseph Brownlee. In the attack by the Indians on Miller’s Blockhouse on July 13, 1782, the Indians killed Elizabeth’s first husband Capt. Brownlee and her three year old son John, and took her, her four month old daughter Jane, and several others prisoner.The Indians took them to Buffalo and to Niagra where Elizabeth was sold to British officers for $20.00. Jane was sold also for $10.00 and two gallons of rum. The British took the captives to Montreal as prisoners of war. They were there exchanged for British prisoners and returned to Hannastown, Pa. in July of 1783. Elizabeth married Capt. Guthrie there one year later in July of 1784. Daughter Jane grew up, married James Hugle and moved to Muskingum County, Ohio.
(SEE MY PAGE FOR CAPT. JOSEPH BROWNLEE FOR INFO ON HIS DEATH AT HANNASTOWN’S MILLER’S BLOCKHOUSE).
______________________________________Thanks to Betty Rudolph of Boise, Idaho for the photo of the Brownlee grave.
______________________________________THANKS TO Al Haxton for the following information:Meckling Farm grounds is now known as Meadowlane Farm. You might want to add this so people can find it.
______________________________________Family links:
Spouse:
Elizabeth Guthrie Brownlee Guthrie (____ – 1842)*Children:
John Brownlee (1779 – 1782)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Meckling Farm Grounds
Hannastown
Westmoreland County
Pennsylvania, USA
Created by: Mr. Ed
Record added: Feb 19, 2001
Find A Grave Memorial# 5215636

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=5215636

*****************

war of 1812 history channel

12. Corporal John Koiner War of 1812

John Koiner

John Koiner War of 1812 Veteran US Military.jpg

michael-keinadt-koiner-1

Birth: Jun. 14, 1792
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Death: Jan. 29, 1852
Augusta County
Virginia, USA

John was the husband of Jane Koiner and served as a Corporal in the Fifth Virginia militia Regiment commanded by Colonel McDowell in the War of 1812. He was 59 years 3 months and 15 days old when he died.Family links:
Parents:
Kasper Koiner (1764 – 1856)
Anna Margaret Barger Coiner (1771 – 1850)Spouses:
Jane C. Mowry Koiner (1802 – 1830)
Elizabeth Effinger Thompson Koiner (1800 – 1874)Children:
Martin Luther Coyner (1818 – 1891)*
Henry Koiner (1824 – 1898)*
Delila Koiner Overholt (1826 – 1891)*
Silas Wilber Koiner (1827 – 1908)*
John Lewis Coiner (1830 – 1904)*
Kasper Benton Koiner (1842 – 1931)*
Barbara Antoinette Koiner Hanger (1844 – 1923)*
St. Clair Coyner (1846 – 1887)*Siblings:
Jacob Coyner (1789 – 1874)*
Michael Coiner (1790 – 1864)*
John Koiner (1792 – 1852)
Philip Koiner (1794 – 1872)*
David C. Coiner (1796 – 1880)*
Mary Koiner Koiner (1798 – 1868)*
Samuel Coiner (1802 – 1871)*
Martin Coyner (1804 – 1883)*
Simon Coiner (1806 – 1897)*
Benjamin Coiner (1808 – 1868)*
Susan C. Koiner Henkel (1810 – 1905)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Trinity Lutheran Church Cemetery
Crimora
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Sq31 R4 #21
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Zachary Coiner
Originally Created by: Joan
Record added: Sep 05, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21372563

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2028020&familyTreeID=2

http://person.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/person/290024880553/facts

†****************

CEM727003_1400442429

13. Ebenezer Parkman, Jr.

Birth: unknown
Death: Jul. 5, 1811

Son of Rev E.P.
Age 84Family links:
Parents:
Ebenezer Parkman (1703 – 1782)Siblings:
Ebenezer Parkman (____ – 1811)
Mary Parkman Forbes (1725 – 1776)*
Thomas Parkman (1729 – 1759)*
Lucy Parkman Baldwin Forbes (1734 – 1804)*
Sarah Parkman Cushing (1743 – 1825)*
Susanna Parkman Moore (1745 – 1772)*
Alexander Parkman (1747 – 1828)*
Breck Parkman (1748 – 1825)*
John Parkman (1753 – 1775)*
Hannah Parkman (1758 – 1777)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Memorial Cemetery
Westborough
Worcester County
Massachusetts, USA
Plot: #48
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Jeanne Palleiko
Record added: May 01, 2014
Find A Grave Memorial# 128997888

See page 196 Ebenezer Parkman, Jr. joins the Continental Army:

https://books.google.com/books?id=lxOxa8LCrAYC&pg=PA196&lpg=PA196&dq=thomas+parkman+1729+1759&source=bl&ots=JzHO-2crZg&sig=3vx0rkMV2-xVxZsCr1BrcsMl_-M&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjSrP_dvvvVAhUF2yYKHdVBCYgQ6AEIKTAC#v=onepage&q=thomas%20parkman%201729%201759&f=true

https://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=128997888

******************

14. Colonel Jeduthan Baldwin

ftticonderoga

Fort Ticonderoga

https://www.fortticonderoga.org

Arnold-leading-charge-at-Saratoga

Battle of Saratoga

s-l400

13615058_1726501144289598_4852812987029983198_n

Minuteman statue 2

34184725_1409699438

Col. Baldwin’s tombstone reads, “Be it remembered that here lies the body of
Jeduthan Baldwin, colonel and engineer in the late American war, who died June
the 4th 1788. He was a true Patriot, an intrepid soldier, an exemplary Christian, and a friend to all mankind. Blessed are the dead who die in the lord.”

Birth: Jan. 13, 1732
Woburn
Middlesex County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Jun. 4, 1788
Brookfield
Worcester County
Massachusetts, USA

Col and Engineer in the late American War.
Husband of Lucy
Age 56Son of Isaac (20 Feb 1699 Woburn, MA-12 Mar 1756-Sudbury,MA) & Mary “Abigail” A (Flagg) Baldwin (5 Dec 1702-23 Sep 1744) b. Woburn, d. Sudbury MA.Grandson of Deacon Henry Baldwin of Woburn, Massachusetts & Abigail (Fiske) Baldwin
Brother of: Luke Baldwin, Col Nahum Baldwivn, Captain Isaac Baldwin.
Spouse: Lucy (Parkman) Baldwin dau.of Rev.Ebenezer Parkman (d.1782 Westboro,MA) of Westboro,MA.
Father of:
*Jeduthan Baldwin, killed by being thrown from a cart 31 Oct 1763- 6 yrs old.
*Isaac Baldwin, d. 1 Apr 1783 Age 19 yrs. “A senior sophister in the University of Cambridge,…”
*Lucy Baldwin,
*Elizabeth Baldwin
*Luke Baldwin m. Mary (Avery)
**John Avery Baldwin m.Sarah (Collins)
***John Avery Baldwin Jr. m.Elizabeth (Holmes)
****Alice Holmes b. Boston, MA
** Thomas Baldwin
***Charlotte Baldwin (see 1st book link below)
***Thomas Williams BaldwinBirth and Family
On January 13th, 1732, Colonel Jeduthan Baldwin was born in Woburn, Massachusetts. He was the son of Isaac and Mary Flagg Baldwin. His grandfather, Henry Baldwin, was the original settler of Woburn, and the family home that was built in 1640, now called the Baldwin House, is still intact. He did not reside in Woburn for long, but moved to Sudbury, Massachusetts. After Baldwin had grew older, he moved to Brookfield, Massachusetts where he stayed for the duration of his life. He settled in the northern part of this area, which separated itself from the town between the years 1750 and 1756. He became a landowner in May of 1754 with the purchase of about twenty-three acres of land. Throughout his time in North Brookfield, Baldwin acquired a large amount of land. Baldwin married in April of 1757 a woman by the name of Lucy. Her father, Reverend Ebenezer Parkman was the first Reverend to settle in Westboro, Massachusetts. Baldwin carried a good relationship with his father-in-law. Baldwin and Lucy had four children. One child, his daughter was named Betsey and the other three were boys. Jeduthan was killed when he was six years old in October of 1763. Isaac died in 1783, at nineteen years of age. Luke was his third son, he was very successful in his life.French and Indian War
In the spring of 1755, Baldwin was serving in the military. He was twenty-three years old at the time and served with the British campaign in the French and Indian war. He was a captain with a full company in the first attempt to capture Crown Point. During this time, Baldwin was injured in the leg. The injury was severe and the doctors wanted to amputate. Baldwin would not have it, but still the doctors continued threatening to disable him and to perform surgery. Baldwin then informed anyone that came too close he would attempt to shoot them. It ended up healing fine. The expedition against Crown Point ended up not succeeding. This was the British Armies first attempt to capture Crown Point. Crown Point was at the southern end of New France. It was valuable to the British because of its location on Lake Champion. The British did not have the element of surprise behind them and the first attempt to capture the fort failed. The current plan of capturing the fort was expelled.The British campaign moved onto other plans in 1755, which included the building of Fort Williams Henry, which was south of Crown Point. Here, Baldwin worked under the British engineer Captain William Erye. Captain Erye was one of the best British engineers of his time. Baldwin watched and learned very carefully. The construction of this fort lasted two years. It was built on Lake George. This was a good location because Fort Edward, on the Hudson, was only sixteen miles away. It was also an important location because it was located on the border of New York and New France. Captain Erye designed the fort as well and as built it. The fort included hospital and moate. It could house up to about 400 men.Baldwin continued his involvement in the military throughout the French and Indian war. In 1759, he was part of another siege at Crown Point. This was the fifth siege against Crown Point. The second had happened a few years before. It had failed because the British had under estimated the numbers of French soldiers. During this third attempt to take control of the fort, the French launched an attack against them. Part of the British Army fled to another camp and the Fort William Henry massacre ended up taking place. In the fourth, the British ended up fleeing after battle. Finally, in the fifth, they were successful at capturing Crown Point. The French were weakened because the way the troops had been dispersed. Gaining this fort gave the British campaign a huge lead because of prime location. Fort Ticonderoga was also captured in this time. This gave the British campaign the control of a wholechain of lakes. Baldwin was a captain and was a part of these efforts.Before the Revolutionary War
After the French and Indian War, Baldwin returned to his land and family in North Brookfield. His father died around this time. During the time prior to 1744 and the beginning of the Revolutionary War, Baldwin used this time to become a trader and farmer. He would haul merchandise from Boston and sell it. He seemed to be very successful before the war, for he obtained more land.In the winter of 1773, Baldwin was a part of a committee made of five men. These men were reviewing two letters written from Boston. These letters related to the British import of tea. They agreed that they would no longer support the British tea because they would be losing out on their own free rights. The following March, Baldwin’s town held a meeting. He was picked to be the Town Clerk, one of five members that made up the Selectmen, and then one of the two surveyors of shingles. In September of 1774, the town also selected the members of the Committee of Correspondence; Baldwin was chosen to be apart of this group too. Also in September Baldwin became a delegate for a committee of the Provincial Congress. The Provincial Congress was a way for the towns and settlements outside of the British controlled Boston to meet and determine how they wanted Massachusetts to be in the future. John Hancock was the president of this congress. After initially being a part of the committee, there was a town meeting in December of 1774 and Baldwin was voted to be a delegate at a another meeting of the congress. In the next year, Baldwin donates many supplies to the war effort such as corn, beans, and cheese.6 Throughout 1775 Baldwin’s engineering skills were used in the rebel military. Baldwin worked on Bunker Hill and Prospect Hill. Here he installed breastwork fortifications. Breastworks are simple defenses that can be put up quickly. They are normally composed of dirt and logs and roughly chest high. These defenses were quickest way to set up protection. Baldwin was not a participant in the Battle at Bunker Hill; however, his brother was present and killed. In 1776, Baldwin gained the rank of Colonel and also the title of Chief American Military Engineer of the Northern Theater Army.The Expierence of Ticonderoga (Reported by “Colonel Baldwin”)
Not a week passed after my first arrival at Fort Ticonderoga in July of 1776 before all of my articles were stolen, not limited to my clothes but also my money, papers and effects. I was “ heartily tired of this Retreating, Ragged, Starved, lousey, thievish, Pockey Army in this unhealthy Country”. I spent much of the remainder of that year sickly and left for home inBrookfield. Thus my first impression of Fort Ticonderoga was at best poor.Upon my return to Fort Ticonderoga a year later, General Schuyler gave me orders that entailed constructing an elaborate bridge between Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Independence. This was my clear priority along with general improvements to the fort and Mount Independence. These orders also called for many other improvements to the garrison. By the time Major General Arthur St. Clair arrived at the fort I had achieved much in the way of repairs and fortifications. I had “ designed and built or repaired ships and sawmills, batteries and re-doubts, a wharf, two guardhouses, a boom of logs across the lake to impede enemy vessels, an artillery park, campsites, a huge storehouse, hospitals, and a bakery”. I also located a source of drinking water on Mount Independence that turned out to be quite invaluable. Furthermore, I supervised construction on what would later be called the Great Bridge. Along the way I received some skilled assistance from Colonel Thaddeus Kosciuszko, a volunteer from Poland with engineering experience. Who turned out to be a bigger help than I thought he would be.Upon Major General St. Clair’s arrival there was a heavy stream of fog and rain that seemed to foreshadow the state of the fort. “ As Charles Carroll realized when he laid eyes on the place a year before, it was a dilapidated ruin; worse, it was presently so short of manpower, arms, provisions, and every item of equipment that it was absurd to expect defenders to hold out against military force determined to overrun the place”(Ketchum). Even with all of my extensive improvements the fort was in a dire state. Shortly after his arrival at the fort I arranged a tour of the defenses and armaments for the Major General.During the month of June there was the much welcomed sound of work in the air, with companies drilling, carpenters sharpening tools and me delegating all of the work as best I could. I had Kosciuszko take 100 men and build batteries and for a barrier of spiked trees. I supervised 150 men in sinking caissons. I had Udney Hay take charge of a number of black freedmen who were drafted from Continental regiments. The only time that the surrounding valley was quite was at night when the men could make out the call of an owl, or even sometimes a wolf.Even with all of this work, it was almost inevitable that the fortifications at Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Independence would not hold, and on July the fifth I was given orders to help orchestrate a retreat. I remember the time exactly that Major General St. Clair informed me of this, it was nine o’clock. Seeing that retreat was the only logical option, I went about doing the only thing I could do make sure the evacuation went as seamlessly as possible. My orders dictated that I was to have my artificers collect all of their tools and deliver them to the boats by 2:00AM. Needless to say I had all of my men assembled by midnight, and had everything taken care of on the Ticonderoga side. Although not without leaving a few important things behind, the retreat was widely successful. We not only made it out with hardly a casualty, we managed to salvage enough equipment to keep going and survive, only just.The Battle Saratoga
In the Battle of Saratoga Baldwin did not do anything of much significance. He was there, though, and participated in the battle. Leading up to this battle there was a shift in his, along with the military’s in general, mood. They were no longer “just getting by,” the mood was more positive. Before the battle, Baldwin put his efforts into destroying as opposed to creating. He lead a group of 280 men to Stillwater, there they either burned or transported planks of wood that had been left behind. He also continued on by destroying bridges and tearing up roads. The idea behind all of this destruction was to slow the British force as much as possible and to do anything that would slow them down and make it harder for them to cross the terrain. Baldwin also discovered a group of loyalists around this time and had them turned in.Americans, or rebels, won the Battle of Saratoga. The Battle of Saratoga was broken down to two different battles. The Americans lost the first actually, but in the second came back so strongly that the British were forced to surrender. Leading up to the Battle of Saratoga, many were beginning to think that the “loss” at Ticonderoga wasn’t much of a loss as once thought. Most of the men had escaped and were at Saratoga for that battle. Baldwin goes as far to say that because of St. Clair’s brave and courageous departure from Ticonderoga, Saratoga actually occurred. Without it, he thought that it would have never actually happened. Saratoga’s win, could be directly linked too the evacuation of Ticonderoga. Had the Americans stayed at Ticonderoga, there is a likely chance that the British would have still captured the fort but also been the cause of many causalities and prisoners. Since the Americans fled, they had more forces at Saratoga. The British were also much too confident. They believed that the Americans were weakened by the loss of this fort. While they may have lost supplies they did not lose spirit. The victory at Saratoga is also when the French started to take interest in the Americans and saw that they could beat the British.

After the War and Death
Baldwin continued in the military until April of 1782. Sometime after his time in the army, Baldwin was a part of group of Engineers and a part of a secret society purposed for officers to be able to work through everything they had been through. Baldwin donated money to an academy.

Colonel Jeduthan Baldwin died at North Brookfield, Massachusetts on June 4, 1788 at the age of 56. He was survived by his wife, Judy Baldwin, his son, Luke Baldwin, and his daughter, Betsey Baldwin.

At Baldwin’s funeral Reverend Daniel Foster delivered a sermon which discussed his life accomplishments and his family. Within his sermon Foster dedicated Baldwin’s wife Judy, his living children Luke and Betsey, and his diseased children Jeduthan and Isaac. Foster mentions how his son, Jeduthan, died by being thrown into a cart at the age of six and how his other son, Isaac, died as a college student at the University of Cambridge.

Col. Baldwin’s tombstone reads, “Be it remembered that here lies the body of
Jeduthan Baldwin, colonel and engineer in the late American war, who died June
the 4th 1788. He was a true Patriot, an intrepid soldier, an exemplary Christian, and a friend to all mankind. Blessed are the dead who die in the lord.”

Books on line of Col. Baldwin and links:

http://files.usgwarchives.net/ma/worcester/bios/baldwin110gbs.txt

Revolutionary War Journal of Col. Baldwin: online link: https://archive.org/details/revolutionaryjo00baldgoog

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wjohn55447/quartermaster_artificers.htm

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Revenge_(1776)

Along with a flood of books on Col. Baldwin’s

“Announcement has been made by the War Department that the new fort at the mouth of the Kennebec River, Maine, is named Fort Baldwin in honor and recognition of the services rendered in the War of the Revolution by Col. Jeduthan Baldwin. This was brought about through the efforts of Col. John H. Calef, U. S. A., retired, who is a descendant of Col. Baldwin and has been earnest in his endeavors to have such recognition made.”

Family links:
Spouse:
Lucy Parkman Baldwin Forbes (1734 – 1804)*

Children:
Isaac Baldwin (____ – 1783)*
Jeduthun Baldwin (1757 – 1763)*
Lucy Baldwin (1767 – 1767)*
Luke Baldwin (1769 – 1832)*

*Calculated relationship

Inscription:
Be it remembered that here lies the body of Jeduthun Baldwin, Esq., Col and Engineer in the late American war, who died Jun the 4th, 1788, Age 56. He was a true patriot, an (intrepid) soldier, an exemplary Christian, and a friend to all mankind. Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord.

Burial:
North Brookfield Cemetery
North Brookfield
Worcester County
Massachusetts, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Star Rhodes
Record added: Feb 25, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 34184725

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=34184725

********

15. Captain Seth Phelps

 

38229113_124477911101.jpg

38229113_1499014981.jpg

Captain. 20th/4th/Cont. Corps of Invalids. 1-Jan-1776 to 1-Jan-1783. Original member of the Connecticut Society. http://www.theconnecticutsociety.org

Birth: Nov. 17, 1751
East Windsor
Hartford County
Connecticut, USA
Death: Mar., 1826
Parkman
Geauga County
Ohio, USA

>son of Elisha Phelps (1722 CT–1818 NY) and Elizabeth Holcomb (b 1723 CT)
>grandson of Joseph Holcomb (1686 CT–1766) and Mary Winchell (b 1685 CT)
>great-grandson of Benajah Thomas Holcomb (1644 CT–1736 CT) and Sarah Eno (1649 CT–1732 CT)
>great-great-grandson of Thomas Holcomb (1595 England–1657 CT) and Elizabeth Ferguson (1617 CT–1678 CT)
>great-great-grandson of James Eno (1625 England–1682 CT) and Hannah Bidwell (1634-1657 CT)HIS WIFE, LUCY LEDYARD, WAS THE DAUGHTER OF YOUNGS LEDYARD AND MARY AVERY.Family links:
Children:
Alfred Phelps (1772 – 1861)*
Lucy Phelps Parkman (1783 – 1820)*
Edwin Forman Phelps (1796 – 1863)*
Alexander Phelps (1801 – 1878)**Calculated relationshipInscription:
Seth Phelps
Captain
(11) Conn. Regt
Rev. War
March 1826
Burial:
Old Cemetery
Parkman
Geauga County
Ohio, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: skye
Record added: Jun 11, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 38229113

*********

16. Captain William Belcher

Birth: Aug. 29, 1731
Preston
New London County
Connecticut, USA
Death: Jun. 27, 1801
Preston
New London County
Connecticut, USA

Revolutionary War, Preston, Connecticut; Fourth Battalion, General Wadsworth’s Brigade, Colonel Sameul Selden; 2nd Company, 1st Lieutenant Benjamin Brewster, 2d Lieutenant Isaac Wheeler StantonFamily links:
Parents:
William Belcher (1701 – 1731)Spouse:
Desire Morgan Belcher (1735 – 1801)*Children:
Eunice Belcher (____ – 1763)*
Mehitable Belcher Brewster (1753 – 1825)*
Elisha Belcher (1757 – 1825)*
Nathan Belcher (1759 – 1840)*
Allethina Belcher Parkman (1764 – 1792)*
Eunice Belcher Tyler (1766 – 1788)*
Mary Belcher Hyde (1769 – 1842)*
William Belcher (1772 – 1851)**Calculated relationshipInscription:
In memory of Capt. William Belcher, who died June 27th, 1801, in the 70th year of his age.
For some wise end to us unknown
His God, who dwells in endless light,
Now claims his spirit as His own,
And bids it wing its heavenly flight.
Burial:
Pachaug Cemetery
Griswold
New London County
Connecticut, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Karen Brown
Originally Created by: John Beckstein
Record added: Feb 21, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 48414498

*******

7156818_133640875393.jpg

17. Captain John Coolidge, A Great Grandfather of U.S. President Calvin Coolidge

Birth: 1756
Bolton
Worcester County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Mar. 23, 1822
Plymouth
Windsor County
Vermont, USA

John Coolidge served as a private in the Revolutionary War. Later, he was given the title of Capt. after the war was over. John married Hannah Priest, and they were the great great grandparents of President (John) Calvin Coolidge.Family links:
Parents:
Josiah Coolidge (1715 – 1778)
Mary Jones (1723 – 1806)Spouse:
Hannah Priest Coolidge (1750 – 1828)Children:
Calvin Coolidge (1780 – 1853)*
Luther Coolidge (1782 – 1856)*
Catherine Coolidge Sawyer (1784 – 1862)*
Polly Coolidge Sprague (1791 – 1869)*Sibling:
John Coolidge (1756 – 1822)
Obadiah Coolidge (1758 – ____)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Plymouth Notch Cemetery
Plymouth
Windsor County
Vermont, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Jill Rains
Record added: Feb 07, 2003
Find A Grave Memorial# 7156818

 

*******

7190993_1482339085

18. Gershom Bradford

Birth: Dec. 21, 1691
Plymouth
Plymouth County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Apr. 4, 1757
Bristol
Bristol County
Rhode Island, USA

Family links:
Parents:
Samuel Bradford (1667 – 1714)
Hannah Rogers Bradford (1668 – 1754)

Spouse:
Priscilla Wiswall Bradford (1690 – 1780)

Children:
Daniel Bradford (1721 – 1810)*
Solomon Bradford (1727 – 1795)*
Job Bradford (1732 – 1789)*

Siblings:
Hannah Bradford Gilbert (1689 – 1772)*
Gershom Bradford (1691 – 1757)
Perez Bradford (1694 – 1746)*
Elizabeth Bradford Whiting (1696 – 1777)*
Jerusha Bradford Gay (1698 – 1783)*
Welthy Bradford Lane (1702 – 1755)*
Gamaliel Bradford (1704 – 1778)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Unknown
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Don Blauvelt
Originally Created by: P Fazzini
Record added: Feb 15, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 48167263

*******

14519972_124596426238

19. General Andrew Pickens

Birth: Sep. 13, 1739
Buck
Lancaster County
Pennsylvania, USA
Death: Aug. 11, 1817
Tamassee
Oconee County
South Carolina, USA

Revolutionary War South Carolina Militia General, US Congressman. Born in Pennsylvania, he traveled South with family along the Great Wagon Road in search of land, and settled in Abbeyville County, South Carolina. He was first a military leader against Cherokee Indians, then a prominent Rebel Commander who led American forces against the British in the American Revolution. His troops were successful especially at the Battles of Kettle Creek and Cowpens. He was awarded a sword by the Continental Congress and was the first United States Congressman from the Pendleton, South Carolina district. Son of Andrew Pickens & Nancy Ann Davis. Husband of Rebecca Floride Calhoun, married 19 March, 1765. (bio by: Scott F. Lewis)Family links:
Parents:
Andrew Pickens (1690 – 1756)
Nancy Davis Pickens (____ – 1760)Spouse:
Rebecca Floride Calhoun Pickens (1745 – 1814)*Children:
Mary Pickens Harris (1766 – 1836)*
Anne Pickens Simpson (1770 – 1846)*
Margaret Pickens Bowie (1776 – 1830)*
Andrew Pickens (1779 – 1838)*
Rebecca Pickens Noble (1784 – 1831)*
Catherine Pickens Hunter (1786 – 1871)*
Joseph Pickens (1791 – 1853)*

Sibling:
Jane Pickens Miller (1738 – 1824)*
Andrew Pickens (1739 – 1817)

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Old Stone Church Cemetery
Clemson
Pickens County
South Carolina, USA
Plot: Pickens Family Plot
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: Scott F. Lewis
Record added: Jun 05, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 14519972

*******

5184682_136071714335.jpg

20. Rebecca Florida Calhoun Pickens

Birth: Oct. 18, 1745
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Death: Dec. 9, 1814
Tamassee
Oconee County
South Carolina, USA

Rebecca Floride Calhoun (daughter of Ezekiel Calhoun and Jane Ewing) was born 1745, and died 1814 in Tomassee, Pendleton, SC. She married Gen. Andrew Pickens on March 19, 1765 in Long Cane Creek, SC, son of Andrew Pickens and Nancy Ann Davis

Rebecca Floride Calhoun:
Rebecca Calhoun, d/o Ezekiel Calhoun, g/d of James Calhoun + Catherine. Rebecca was the 1st cousin of John Caldwell Calhoun, (1782-1852) s/o Patrick Calhoun + Martha Caldwell, g/s of James Calhoun + Catherine.

More About Rebecca Floride Calhoun:
Burial: Old Stone Presbyterian Church, Pendleton, Oconee County, SC.

More About Rebecca Floride Calhoun and Gen. Andrew Pickens:
Marriage: March 19, 1765, Long Cane Creek, SC. Calhoun (daughter of Ezekiel Calhoun and Jane Ewing) was born 1745, and died 1814 in Tomassee, Pendleton, SC. She married Gen. Andrew Pickens on March 19, 1765 in Long Cane Creek, SC, son of Andrew Pickens and Nancy Ann Davis.

Notes for Rebecca Floride Calhoun:
Rebecca Calhoun, d/o Ezekiel Calhoun, g/d of James Calhoun + Catherine. Rebecca was the 1st cousin of John Caldwell Calhoun, (1782-1852) s/o Patrick Calhoun + Martha Caldwell, g/s of James Calhoun + Catherine.

Rebecca Floride Calhoun and Gen. Andrew Pickens
married March 19, 1765, Long Cane Creek, Abbeville Dist, South Carolina.

**********************************************************

The Index-Journal (Greenwood, South Carolina) · Sat, FEB 28, 1948

Although it has been printed before, the current account of this massacre of white settlers by the Indians on Feb 1, 1760, will be of interest. The account with the original spelling and capitalization of all nouns, as printed in the South Carolina Gazette under date, Feb 9, 1760:
“Yesterday so’nnight (an archaic word to describe a period of seven nights and days or a week), the whole of the Long Cane Settlers to the Number of 150 Souls moved off with most of their Effects in Waggons; to go toward Augusta in Georgia and in a few Hours after their setting off were surprised and attacked by about 100 Cherokees on Horseback, while they were getting their Waggons out of a boggy Place; They (the settlers) had about 40 Gunmen, who might have made a very good defence, but unfortunately their Guns were in the Waggons; the few who recovered their’s (Guns), fought, the Enemy half an Hour and were at last obliged to fly; In the action, they lost seven Waggons and 40 of their people killed or taken prisoner (including Women and Children) the Rest got safe to Augusta; whence the Express arrived here with the same Account on Tuesday Morning.”

Later, on Feb 23, 1760, the South Carolina Gazette had this item:
“Mr Patrick Calhoun, one of the unfortunate Settlers at Long Canes who were attacked by the Cherokees on the first Instant as they were removing their Wives, Children and Best Effects to Augusta, in Georgia, for Safety, is just come to Town (Charlestown) and informs us “That the whole of these Settlers might be about 250 souls, 50 or 60 of them fighting Men; that their Loss in that Affair amounted to about Fifty Persons, chiefly Women and Children with 15 loaded Waggons and Carts; that he had since been at the Place where the Action happened, in order to bury the Dead and found only 20 of their bodies, most inhumanly butchered; that the Indians had burned the Woods all around but had left the Waggons and Carts there empty and unhurt; and that he believed all the fighting Men would return and fortify the Long Cane Settlement were (if) part of the Rangers so stationed as to give them some Assistance and Protection.”

Also, in this same issue of the South Carolina Gazette, dated Feb 23, 1760, is the following
“We have to late Advices from the Fort Prince-George (the outmost fort in the Cherokee Indian foothills town in what is now Oconee County) of any Consequences from places on that Route but from Fort Moore (a fort opposite Augusta and on the South Carolina side of the Savannah river) we learn that a Gang of 18 Cherokees divided into 3 or 4 Parties, on the 15th instant way-laid, killed and scalped Ulrig Tobler, Esq, a Captain of Militia in those Parts as he was riding from his Father’s to that Fort and shot Mr William Calhoun, who was with him, in the Hand; 3 other Persons who were in Company were unhurt; the Indians who killed Capt Tobler left a Hatchet sticking in his Neck, on which were 3 old Notches and 3 newly cut.”

Several of the Settlers were found hiding in the woods by the men who well-armed and in numbers returned to search for the victims.

~~~Patrick Calhoun, of the original brothers who settled in the Long Canes, found his niece, REBECCA CALHOUN, daughter of his brother Ezekiel Calhoun, hiding in a Cane Brake. This Rebecca Calhoun afterwards married Andrew Pickens, who was a Brigadier General in the Revolution, member of Congress, the father of Andrew Pickens who became Governor of South Carolina in 1816.

Gen Andrew Pickens declined the offer of being made Governor of South Carolina but his son, Andrew Pickens Jr did serve, and had a son, Francis Wilkinson Pickens, who like his grandfather, was a member of Congress and was Ambassador to Russia just before the War Between the States and in 1860 became the “War Governor of South Carolina.” These were descendants of the young Rebecca Calhoun who escaped the night attack of the Indians not far from Patterson’s Bridge over Long Cane – remembering, of course, that there was no bridge over Long Cane at that place or any other in those early times. There was a ford there and tradition is that the pursuing Indians had almost given up hope of catching up with the fleeing whites but some of the “Waggons” (the old spelling) got stuck in the bog and the noise made in trying to get the horses to pull the “wagons” and carts out of the bog reached the ears of the Indians and they came on. They did not attack, however, as the Gazette account states, until after nightfall and while the whites were off their guard, getting ready to feed the horses and have supper themselves and with their guns all hidden or covered up in the wagons and carts.

**********************************************************

CHILDREN OF REBECCA & GENERAL ANDREW PICKENS:
1. Mary PICKENS
2. Ezekiel PICKENS
3. Ann PICKENS
4. *unknown PICKENS
5. Jane Bonneau PICKENS
6. *unknown PICKENS
7. Margaret PICKENS
8. Andrew PICKENS
9. *unknown PICKENS
10. Rebecca PICKENS
11. Catherine PICKENS
12. Sarah PICKENS
13. Joseph PICKENS

************************************************************
She was a cousin of John C Calhoun FAG # 2437
Information shared by phillip.fazzini@zoomtown.com

Family links:
Parents:
Ezekiel Colhoun (1729 – ____)
Jane Ewing Calhoun

Spouse:
Andrew Pickens (1739 – 1817)

Children:
Mary Pickens Harris (1766 – 1836)*
Anne Pickens Simpson (1770 – 1846)*
Margaret Pickens Bowie (1776 – 1830)*
Andrew Pickens (1779 – 1838)*
Rebecca Pickens Noble (1784 – 1831)*
Catherine Pickens Hunter (1786 – 1871)*
Joseph Pickens (1791 – 1853)*

Siblings:
Rebecca Floride Calhoun Pickens (1745 – 1814)
Catherine Calhoun Noble (1747 – ____)*
John Ewing Colhoun (1749 – 1802)*
Mary Calhoun Carr (1750 – 1810)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Old Stone Church Cemetery
Clemson
Pickens County
South Carolina, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: C. LATTA 
Originally Created by: Jimmy Gilstrap
Record added: Feb 03, 2001
Find A Grave Memorial# 5184682

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

One Response to “20 American Revolution & War of 1812 Veterans – Parkman, Koiner, Keinadt, Barger, Darst, Converse, Flora, Brownlee, Baldwin, Phelps, Belcher, Coolidge, Bradford, Pickens, Ancestors”

  1. Elias Parkman Cofounder of Dorchester, MA circa 1632 | Parkman Genealogy Says:

    […] https://parkmangenealogy.wordpress.com/2009/03/08/4-american-revolution-veterans-parkman-koiner-barg… […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: