Parkman Plaza – Boston Common – 1958-1960

January 1, 2010
Parkman Plaza - Boston Common -Religion Statue

Parkman Plaza – Boston Common -Religion Statue

RELIGION

parkman-bandstand-boston-common-park_5

Parkman Plaza was named after Dr. George Parkman, Jr. who, upon his death in 1908, donated $5 million for the preservation of Boston Common and other city parks. Located on Tremont street, Parkman Plaza marks the beginning of the Boston Freedom Trail. The plaza’s Visitor Center provides free maps for following the historic walking tour of Boston and a red line painted on the ground marks the trail. In 1961, three statues were dedicated to Parkman Plaza, meant to depict three traits of Bostonian life. The statues create a semi circle around the plaza. On the south side of the plaza, a statue of a young boy on his knees, hands lifted to heaven depict Boston’s religious roots. The west side has a statue of a man drilling for industry. The north side is labeled learning shows a young boy sitting on top of a globe, reading a book.

 

 

George Parkman JR bio

 

https://www.citywalkingguide.com/boston/bostoncommon/parkmanplaza

 


INDUSTRY

LEARNING

 

freedom trail boston.jpg


Parkman Bandstand @ The Boston Common

parkman-bandstand-boston-common-park_2

The Parkman Bandstand was named for one of the Boston Common’s greatest benefactors, George Francis Parkman Jr., who died in 1908 and left $5 million for the care of the Common and other city parks. The bandstand was originally dedicated in 1912 and was restored in 1996. It still hosts small events such as midday concerts, theatrical productions, weddings and speeches (Obama  in 2007). Annually, the Boston Freedom Rally is held at Parkman Bandstand, the second largest rally calling for the reform of marijuana laws in the United States. The Commonwealth Shakespeare Company puts on free plays from Parkman Bandstand, drawing as many as 100,000 theater-lovers into the park every summer.

George Parkman JR bio

Boston Common History & Map_tcm3-30691 www.cityofboston.gov

Boston Common History Map & brochure produced by the City of Boston link:

http://www.cityofboston.gov/images_documents/Boston%20Common%20History%20%26%20Map_tcm3-30691.pdf

http://www.cityofboston.gov/parks/emerald/boston_common.asp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Parkman

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/murder/

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Alexander Parkman – American Revolution Lieutenant & Minuteman – 1776

January 1, 2010

american-revolution-soldier-4

minuteman concord statue

american-revolution-soldier-5

minuteman statue

american-revolution-soldier-2

 

 

 

sarcoin-2

SAR – Sons of the American Revolution (bronze round)

mel gibson patriot 2.jpg

mel gibson patriot dvd.jpg

This grave of Alexander & Kezia Parkman is @ the Old Westmoreland Cemetery, Oneida County, NY.

This inactive cemetery is located off Rte. 233, behind the Post Office in Westmoreland. Many of the stones are badly worn but the cemetery is very well maintained. File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by:
Kathy Last kllast@juno.com May 2, 2009, 7:37 pm

http://www.usgwarchives.net/ny/oneida/photos/tombstones/oldwestmoreland/parkman7003gph.jpg/a>

Birth: Jan. 15, 1747
Westborough
Worcester County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Apr. 1, 1828
Westmoreland
Oneida County
New York, USA

Inscription:
Lieut. In Revolutionary War, age 81 yrs

Burial:
Old Westmoreland Cemetery
Westmoreland
Oneida County
New York, USA

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=20630653

23509092_868326666667223_4659114222148191175_o.jpg

Alexander Parkman’s Pedigree & Family link:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027883&familyTreeID=2#

Alexander Parkman, Esq., Lieut., Revolution, born 1747, died April 4, 1828, aged 81.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~coyne2010/westmoreland.html

Parkman, Alexander, Lieut. in Revolutionary War, died April 1, 1828 age 81 yrs
 Parkman, Kezia, wife of Alexander Parkman, died Nov. 15, 1816 age 64 yrs
 Parkman, Lydia, dau of Alexander & Kezia Parkman, died Dec. 21, 1850 age 75 yrs 6 mos
 Parkman, Polly, dau of Alexander & Kezia Parkman, died Feb. 16, 1851 age 71 yrs

http://oneida.nygenweb.net/

Alexander Parkman & Kezia Brown’s 8 children:

http://www.mytrees.com/ancestry-family/th001467-6135.html

Sons of the American Revolution:

http://www.SAR.org

http://patriot.sar.org/fmi/iwp/cgi?-db=Grave%20Registry&-loadframes/a>

 

William Parkman Collection

(includes letters from Alexander, Samuel & William Parkman):

http://www.concordlibrary.org/scollect/Fin_Aids/parkman.html

 

Lydia Parkman duaghter of Alexander and Kezia Parkman

Lydia Parkman daughter of Alexander and Kezia Parkman

Polly Parkman daughter of Alexander and Kezia Parkman

Polly Parkman daughter of Alexander and Kezia Parkman

http://www.usgwarchives.net/ny/tsphoto/oneida/oldwestmoreland.htm

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Alexander Parkman

Birthdate: February 17, 1746
Birthplace: Westborough, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died April 1, 1826
Immediate Family: Son of Rev. Ebenezer Parkman and Hannah Parkman
Husband of Kezia Brown
Father of Lucy Parkman
Brother of Elizabeth Parkman; William Parkman;Sarah Parkman; Susannah Parkman; Breck Parkman; Samuel Parkman; John Parkman; Anna Sophia Brigham; Hannah Parkman; Elias Parkmanand Robert Breck Parkman « less
Half brother of Mary Forbes; Sgt. Ebenezer Parkman;Thomas Parkman; Lydia Parkman and Lucy Forbes

https://www.geni.com/people/Alexander-Parkman/6000000007803859641

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Gideon Parkman Revolutionary war Patriot headstone.jpg

Gideon Parkman Revolutionary War Patriot 1714 1789 DAR Maine.jpg

Gideon Parkman Revolutionary War Patriot – 1714-1789:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=137344667

 

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Kasper Koiner 1.jpg

Kasper Koiner 1764-1856 Private in the American Revolution

Kasper Koiner 2

Birth: Sep. 25, 1764
Millersville
Lancaster County
Pennsylvania, USA
Death: Oct. 31, 1856
Augusta County
Virginia, USA

Kasper was a veteran and served as a Private during the Revolutionary War. He was the son of Michael and Margaret Keinadt and was 92 years and 36 days old when he died.
Kasper married Anna Margaret Barger, the daughter of Jacob Berger/Barger. Kasper met Anna Margaret on a trip to Virginia. They did not know each other long and her father was opposed to the marriage so the 2 young people eloped to Staunton VA. However, in time, Jacob’s opposition was resolved. Kasper and Anna Margaret had 11 children.Family links:
Parents:
Michael Keinadt (1720 – 1796)
Margaret Diller Keinadt (1734 – 1813)Spouse:
Anna Margaret Barger Coiner (1771 – 1850)*Children:
Jacob Coyner (1789 – 1874)*
Michael Coiner (1790 – 1864)*
John Koiner (1792 – 1852)*
Philip Koiner (1794 – 1872)*
David C. Coiner (1796 – 1880)*
Mary Koiner Koiner (1798 – 1868)*
Samuel Coiner (1802 – 1871)*
Martin Coyner (1804 – 1883)*
Simon Coiner (1806 – 1897)*
Benjamin Coiner (1808 – 1868)*
Susan C. Koiner Henkel (1810 – 1905)*Siblings:
George Adam Koiner (1753 – 1820)*
George Michael Koiner (1758 – 1840)*
Mary Coiner Hattabaugh (1762 – ____)*
Kasper Koiner (1764 – 1856)
Catherine Coiner Slagle (1766 – 1855)*
John Coyner (1768 – 1852)*
Martin Luther Coyner (1771 – 1842)*
Jacob Coyner (1772 – 1826)*
Philip Koiner (1776 – 1849)**Calculated relationship

Inscription:

“I know that my Redeemer liveth and that He shall stand at the latter day upon the earth. And though after my skin worms destroy this body yet in my flesh shall I see God. Whom I shall see for myself and mine eyes shall behold.”

Burial:
Trinity Lutheran Church Cemetery
Crimora
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Sq 16 R 4 #3
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Zachary Coiner
Originally Created by: Joan
Record added: Aug 20, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21037294

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=21037294

Kasper Koiner’s Pedigree and Family Group link:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027906&familyTreeID=2

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George Washington Gilbert Stuart Samuel Parkman Boston Museum of fine Arts

George Washington Samuel Parkman Gilbert Stuart BMFA Feb 2015 D952

Samuel Parkman commissioned Gilbert Stuart to paint a full length oil portrait of U.S. President George Washington, which Samuel later gifted to the Town of Boston on the 30th anniversary of the signing of The Declaration of Independence on the 4th of July 1806 where the painting hung in the Faneuil Hall and now in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. The painting by Gilbert Stuart is of George Washington ,in Dorchester Heights, full-length in uniform, standing by a white horse, holding his bridle in his left hand and his chapeau in his right.

https://parkmangenealogy.wordpress.com/2010/01/02/parkman-samuel-u-s-president-george-washington-boston-museum-of-fine-arts/

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Jacob Barger (Berger), He was drafted and served as body guard to George Washington in the Revolutionary war. He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War and a Private serving under the direct command of George Washington during a time of great destitution and starvation:

Jacob Berger (Barger) 1

Jacob Berger (Barger) 2

Birth: Oct. 27, 1745Death: Aug. 27, 1794
Jacob is referred to as the patriarch of Trinity Congregation. He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War and a Private serving under the direct command of George Washington during a time of great destitution and starvation. He at first lived in Rockingham County but after the war he and his wife Elizabeth Hedrick moved to Augusta County. He was only 49 years old when he died.

Family links:
Spouse:
Elizabeth Hedrick Barger (1752 – 1841)*

Children:
Anna Margaret Barger Coiner (1771 – 1850)*
Elizabeth Eggel (1777 – 1816)*
John Barger (1794 – 1845)*

*Calculated relationship

Inscription:
Inscription on the gravestone at the right is written in German and reads:

“Here lies our loved one Jacob Berger who was born on the 27th day of October 1745 and died on the 27th day of August 1794. He was 48 years 2 months and a day old”
“Ye passers-by consider well here my place; seek Jesus in the time of grace that ye may hereafter come to glory”.

Burial:
Trinity Lutheran Church Cemetery
Crimora
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Square 30
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Zachary Coiner
Originally Created by: Joan
Record added: Jul 29, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 20682690

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=20682690

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Jacob Berrier Barger, Sr.:

Birth: Oct. 26, 1745
McGaheysville
Rockingham County
Virginia, USADeath: Aug. 24, 1794
New Hope
Augusta County
Virginia, USA

Wife – Elizabeth /Hedrick/

Father – Casper Barger
Mother – Margaret

When Jacob returned from the Revolutionary War they moved from Rockingham County to Augusta County. Their first child, Anna Margaret, was baptized on April 6, 1772 and was the first recorded entry in the records of Trinity Lutheran Church.

Pam and Steven Bennet (#47208550)
Their suggestion:
————————-
Jacob Barger was born in 1745, married Elizabeth Hedrick in 1772.

He was drafted and served as body guard to George Washington in the Revolutionary war.

He took a deep interest in the matters pertaining to his church and was the patriarch of the Lutheran Church at Koiners Store, Rockingham County, Virginia. He was engaged in the congregations work of building the first church structure there. When he was stricken with paralysis and died at the age of 49. The church still in use, has services once a yer with special occasions and weddings held in it. The pipe organ still in use was brought in over the mountains by ox cart from PA. The homestead, slave house and buildings are still standing and in use.

Please add this to my G Grandfather’s bio

Steve

And Larry #48886082
————————-

Family links:
Parents:
Casper Barger (1708 – 1755)

Spouse:
Elizabeth Hedrick Barger (1752 – 1841)

Sibling:
Philip Barger (1741 – 1803)*
Jacob Berrier Barger (1745 – 1794)

*Calculated relationship
Burial:
Trinity Lutheran Church Cemetery
Crimora
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Barbara Anne (Brownell) …
Record added: Mar 14, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 86738611

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=86738611

Jacob Barger’s Pedigree and Family Group link:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027906&familyTreeID=2

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Michael Keinadt (Koiner) 1

Michael Keinadt (Koiner) 2

Michael Keinadt (Koiner) 3

Michael Keinadt (Koiner) 4

Birth: Jan. 29, 1720, Germany

Death: Nov. 7, 1796
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Michael was born at Winterlingen Germany. He emegrated to America about 1740 and to Virginia in 1790. He was 77 years old when he died.
Michael was also a Revolutionary War soldier in Pennsylvania. He served as a Private. The Revolutionary War marker was placed by the Col. James Patton chapter of the DAR.
Inscription is written in German;
Er liegt der leib of (Micael Keinadt) Gastorben den 7 Nofember 1796 seiner alter Vahr 77 jahr.
Tue her vorieben gehet ach betrachtet meines tet
Sehet usum spet und frieh—–.
Translation; Here lies our loved one Michael Keinadt who died the 7th of November in his 77th year—-

Family links:
Spouse:
Margaret Diller Keinadt (1734 – 1813)

Children:
George Adam Koiner (1753 – 1820)*
George Michael Koiner (1758 – 1840)*
Mary Coiner Hattabaugh (1762 – ____)*
Kasper Koiner (1764 – 1856)*
Catherine Coiner Slagle (1766 – 1855)*
John Coyner (1768 – 1852)*
Martin Luther Coyner (1771 – 1842)*
Jacob Coyner (1772 – 1826)*
Philip Koiner (1776 – 1849)*

*Calculated relationship
Burial:
Trinity Lutheran Church Cemetery
Crimora
Augusta County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Sq 30 R4 #30
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Zachary Coiner
Originally Created by: Joan
Record added: Jul 29, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 20686404

Michael Keinadt’s Pedigree and Family Group:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027910&familyTreeID=2

 

 

 

Parkman Tavern, Concord, MA

January 1, 2010

 

parkman tavern concord mass.jpg

Parkman Tavern, Concord, MA – where the “Shot heard ’round the world” happened that signified the start of The American Revolution War.

The Parkman Tavern is an historic tavern (now a private residence) at 20 Powder Mill Road in Concord, Massachusetts. The 2-1/2 story timber frame house was built in 1659 by a member of the locally prominent Wheeler family. In the late 18th century it was purchased by William Parkman, great-uncle to historian Francis Parkman, who operated a tavern on the premises.

minuteman concord statue

Biography: William Parkman (1741-1832) was born in Westborough, Massachusetts (the eighth of seventeen children of Reverend Ebeneezer Parkman of Westborough, Mass).  He worked as a carpenter and surveyor until about 1770, when he moved to Concord, Massachusetts, and purchased a farm.  In addition to his work on the farm, he served as deputy sheriff from 1770 to 1795.  At this time, his farm also functioned as a tavern specifically for teamsters.  In 1778, he was appointed Deacon to the First Church of Concord.  In 1795, having moved close to the town center, he became a shopkeeper and postmaster, a position he held until 1810.  Meanwhile, William Parkman also served as a Justice of the Peace.  From 1798 to 1825, he was a member of the Social Circle in Concord.  Parkman had eight children with wife Lydia Adams, to whom he was married from 1766 to 1787.  He second wife (1789-1810) was Lydia Proctor.  His third wife was Sarah Wheeler, who was the mother-in-law of Parkman’s fifth daughter, Sarah.  They remained married from 1811 until William Parkman’s death in 1832.

http://www.concordlibrary.org/scollect/Fin_Aids/parkman.html

U.S. National Register of Historic Places: Parkman Tavern

Nearest city: Concord, Massachusetts

Coordinates: 42°25′46″N 71°22′36″WCoordinates: 42°25′46″N 71°22′36″W

Built: 1659

The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: Parkman Tavern

 

 

Drawing of Midnight Ride of Paul Revere, by Miss C. S. King of Boston, published in "Beginner's American History" by D. H. Montgomery.  Boston: Ginn & Company, 1893.

The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere

Revere and Dawes reached the Clarke home in Lexington around midnight and delivered their warning.  Suspicious as to why a such a large force of British Regulars would be needed to arrest Adams and Hancock, they realized the real target must be stores of munitions hidden by the Colonists in Concord, a few miles to the west.

Revere and Dawes jumped back on their horses and headed to Concord – but Longfellow also fails to mention that Dr. Samuel Prescott also joined them along the way.

Dr. Prescott, a Concord local, had been visiting his girlfriend.

When Revere and Dawes sounded the alert, Prescott jumped out the back window of his girlfriend’s house and joined them.  (Don’t you wonder why he didn’t go out the door instead?)

The three men decided to ride toward Concord and stop at every house along the way (which surely included the Parkman Tavern) to warn the residents about the British movements.

– See more at: http://www.boston-discovery-guide.com/midnight-ride-of-paul-revere.html#sthash.ANbb5Xo7.dpuf

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prb2

Paul Revere bell donated by Samuel Parkman

More Paul Revere & Parkman family history:

https://parkmangenealogy.wordpress.com/?s=paul+revere

 

 

6. Benjamin Darst:

Benjamin Darst 1.jpg

Benjamin Darst 1760 – 1835 Soldier of the Revolution, Distinguished Citizen of Lexington

Benjamin Darst 2.jpg

Birth: Jan. 18, 1760
Death: Oct. 6, 1835

The link to Benjamin’s immigrant father was provided by Robert V Darst.On 18 April 2010, Michael Bogoslawskiprovided the following information;The Darst family came to the Valley from Switzerland via Pennsylvania.
Benjamin Darst, Sr. (1760-1835) was an influential member of the community, whose skills including pottery making, brick making, and construction.Family links:
Parents:
Abraham Derst (1725 – 1772)Spouses:
Lucy Woodward Darst (1758 – 1794)*
Sarah Lewis Darst (1755 – 1827)*
Hannah Kean Darst (____ – 1864)*Children:
John Darst (1784 – 1835)*
Benjamin Darst (1785 – 1821)*
Samuel L. Darst (1788 – 1864)*
Daniel Darst (1790 – ____)*Siblings:
Abraham Darst (1745 – 1822)*
Jacob Durst (1754 – 1814)*
Samuel Darst (1754 – 1791)*
David Darst (1757 – 1826)*
Benjamin Darst (1760 – 1835)
Paul Darst (1762 – 1826)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery
Lexington
Lexington City
Virginia, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Mike
Record added: Sep 09, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 15676859

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15676859

Benjamin Darst’s Pedigree and Family Group:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2031215&familyTreeID=2

Henry Thoreau Lived @ Parkman House Concord Mass in 1823 – 1844 when he was Writing Drafts of WALDEN POND

November 25, 2009

Henry Thoreau Walden Pond in the Fall Replica Cabin on Walden Pond & Bronze Thoreau Statue

henry david thoreau richest.jpg

Henry’s Dad John perfected the art of making lead pencils The Thoreaus were winding up their affairs in the Parkman house near (but not on) the site of the present Concord Free Public Library building, and getting ready to make other arrangements. “Made pencils in 1844.” Thoreau was preparing to go to Walden Pond to work on his first book, revising and copying the scrappy remains of his 1837-1844 volumes into the Long Book, drafting original passages of narration and description, and incorporating journal entries not originally related to the trip taken by the two brothers. http://www.kouroo.info/general/CFPL.pdf/a>

John Thoreau, Senior left off teaching school at 6 Cornhill Court in Boston, Henry David Thoreau was taken out of the Boston infant school, and theThoreaus removed from Whitwell’s house on Pinckney Street in Boston to rent the Jonas Hastings house in Concord, built in about 1790, Mr. Parkman’s brick house at the corner of Main Street and Walden Street, William Parkman was born in 1741. In 1788 William Parkman became a deacon of the 1st Parish Church of Concord. (He would serve until 1826). January 26, 1789: At Concord, the Rev. Ezra Ripley united Deacon William Parkman of Concord and Lydia Proctor of Boston in marriage. In 1823 John Thoreau, Senior left off teaching school at 6 Cornhill Court in Boston, David Henry Thoreau was taken out of the Boston infant school, and theThoreaus removed from Whitwell’s house on Pinckney Street in Boston to rent the Jonas Hastings house in Concord, built in about 1790, Deacon William Parkman’s brick house at the corner of Main Street and Walden Street, where the father would go into the pencil-making business of Dunbar & Stow that was making use of graphite that Charles Dunbar had discovered in 1821 near Bristol in New Hampshire, and also take up responsibility for the mill, milldam, race, and pond on Mill Brook just south of the “Milldam” district. Henry David Thoreau began to attend Miss Phœbe Wheeler’s infant school. Here is a later reminisce of this period in the life of the Thoreau family: “Mother reminds me that when we lived at the Parkman house she lost a ruff a yard and a half long and with an edging three yards long to it, which she had laid on the grass to whiten, and, looking for it, she saw a robin tugging at the tape string of a stay on the line. He would repeatedly get it in his mouth, fly off and be brought up when he got to the end of his tether. Miss Ward thereupon tore a fine linen handkerchief into strips and threw them out, and the robin carried them all off. She had no doubt that he took the ruff.”

http://www.kouroo.info/Thoreau/ThoreauResidences.pdf

 

Meanwhile Concord becomes, some say, the literary capital of America. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, and Nathaniel Hawthorne are the best know of many thinkers and writers in Concord. Visitors from far-off places come to discuss major issues of the day. Transcendentalism develops, and the Concord School of Philosophy is built. Thoreau documents the town’s natural history and geography, and briefly lives in a Walden Pond woodlot surrounded by intensive agriculture. Culture expands in academies, libraries, and lyceums. Voluntary associations proliferate. Women play major roles in town. Abolitionism is active and the underground railroad runs through Concord. Monuments in Monument Square and Sleepy Hollow Cemetery suggest the impact of the Civil War on Concord.

 

http://www.concordlibrary.org/scollect/bhc/bhc.html #####

 

 

Jonas Hastings House built by Deacon William Parkman in 1790 Concord, Mass (house at far right with tree front & center of house) This photograph of Concord Center, taken in about 1865, shows in the distance the Jonas Hastings house belonging to Deacon William Parkman in which the Thoreaus were to reside from 1823 to 1826, at the corner of Main and Walden Streets. As you can see, initially the Hastings corner had projected out into what is now part of Main Street, so that the house would need to be moved backward to allow Main Street to be widened prior to the opening in 1873 of the newly constructed Concord Free Public Library. (The Hastings house would ultimately be taken down to make way for the business block put up by pharmacist John C. Friend in 1892.)

http://www.kouroo.info/Thoreau/DeaconParkman.pdf

 

This had been the abode of old Deacon Parkman, a grand- uncle of the late Francis Parkman, the historian, and son of the Westborough clergyman from whom this distinguished family descends. Deacon Parkman was a merchant in Con cord, and lived in what was then a good house. It stood in the middle of the village, where the Public Library now is. The ” Texas ” house was built by Henry Thoreau and his father John ; it was named from a section of the village then called ” Texas,” because a little remote from the churches and schools ; perhaps the same odd fancy that had bestowed the name of “Virginia” on the road of Thoreau s birthplace. The ” Yellow house re-formed ” was a small cottage rebuilt and enlarged by the Thoreaus in 1850 ; in this, on the main street, Henry and his father and mother died. http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:Familiar_letters_of_Henry_David_Thoreau.djvu/29 #####
http://books.google.com/books?id=v-Qghe4gyvMC&pg=PA117&lpg=PA117&dq=thoreau+parkman&source=bl&ots=yrnnm5uX0G&sig=8zWa18uxZcduHwKk-9uuhGfisfs&hl=en&sa=X&ei=2IJuT87cCuP20gH_4KTRBg&ved=0CCkQ6AEwATgU#v=onepage&q=thoreau%20parkman&f=false/a>
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-oVgywnk84
Some evidence suggests that three structures date to the 1650’s, the Thomas Dane House (47 Lexington Rd.), Edward Bulkeley House (92 Sudbury Rd.) and Parkman Tavern (20 Powder Mill Rd. CONCORD,MASS). Speculation continues that two rooms of the Old Block House (now at 57 Lowell Rd.) might have been the home of Rev. John Jones, a town founder and resident from 1635 to 1644.
http://www.concordlibrary.org/scollect/bhc/bhc.html #####
Letter from Samuel Parkman of Boston to his brother William of Concord. Dad to both Reverend Ebenezer Parkman of Westborough. William Parkman Collection, 1760-1826 Vault A45, Parkman Unit 1 Extent: 23 items. Arrangement: Organized into two series: I. Papers, 1773-1826; II. Wallets, 1760, 1770. Papers arranged chronologically. Biography: William Parkman (1741-1832) was born in Westborough, Massachusetts (the eighth of seventeen children). He worked as a carpenter and surveyor until about 1770, when he moved to Concord, Massachusetts, and purchased a farm. In addition to his work on the farm, he served as deputy sheriff from 1770 to 1795. At this time, his farm also functioned as a tavern specifically for teamsters. In 1778, he was appointed Deacon to the First Church of Concord. In 1795, having moved close to the town center, he became a shopkeeper and postmaster, a position he held until 1810. Meanwhile, William Parkman also served as a Justice of the Peace. From 1798 to 1825, he was a member of the Social Circle in Concord. Parkman had eight children with wife Lydia Adams, to whom he was married from 1766 to 1787. He second wife (1789-1810) was Lydia Proctor. His third wife was Sarah Wheeler, who was the mother-in-law of Parkman’s fifth daughter, Sarah. They remained married from 1811 until William Parkman’s death in 1832. Scope and content: Collection (1760-1826) consists of correspondence, one writ, one receipt, and two wallets. The writ dates from William Parkman’s time as deputy sheriff and relates to the case of Sprague v. Seaver. Parkman’s correspondence consists largely of letters from his brothers, Alexander and Samuel Parkman. The letters describe the financial situation of Alexander Parkman, who is requesting or waiting for money. Samuel Parkman writes to William Parkman about their brother’s debts. Additionally, the letters provide some information about the personal lives of William and Alexander. Related to these letters is a receipt signed by Samuel Parkman acknowledging receipt of $300 from Roger Brown on the account of Alexander Parkman. The collection also contains a letter from J. Wheeler concerning items that William Parkman would like for his shop. The collection also includes one letter from William Parkman’s son William and one from Esek Marsh. (Both involve personal matters.) Accompanying the papers are two leather wallets inscribed by William Parkman: one dated 1760 and one dated 1770. Processed by: Sarah Galligan; finding aid completed 03/01/2012. Container List: Series I: Papers, 1773-1826 (in folder): All letters are addressed to William Parkman in Concord, Mass. Writ to William Parkman as Deputy Sheriff (Case of Sprague vs. Seaver) 1773 July 10. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1796 Nov. 22. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1797 April 15. ALS from J. Wheeler, Boston, Mass., 1805 May 9. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1806 May 17. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1806 Dec. 27. ALS from Samuel Parkman, Boston, Mass., 1807 May 8. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1807 May 9. ALS from Samuel Parkman, Boston, Mass., 1807 May 25. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1807 June 21. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1807 September 12. ALS from Samuel Parkman, Boston, Mass., 1898 January 19. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1808 May 7. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1808 July 12. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1808 September 3. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1808 December 17. ALS from Samuel Parkman, Boston, Mass., 1809 February 9. ALS from Samuel Parkman, Boston, Mass., 1809 February 18. Receipt signed by Samuel Parkman acknowledging receipt of $300 from Roger Brown on the account of Alexander Parkman, 1808 February 13. ALS from William Parkman, Camden, Maine, to his father William in Concord, Mass., 1818 Sept. 28. ALS from Esek Marsh, Holliston, Mass. 1826 April 8. Series II: Wallets, 1760, 1770 (in artifact box): Wallet inscribed “Wm Parkman 1760.” Wallet inscribed “Wm Parkman 1770.”
http://www.concordlibrary.org/scollect/Fin_Aids/parkman.html

Parkman Genealogy – 1986

November 20, 2009

 

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Parkman Genealogy Letter of Introduction (drafted in 1986)

 

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Contents of Letter of Introduction (1986)

 

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My initial letter of introduction & pedigree chart circa 1986 while I Assistant Vice President at DeBartolo Financial Services.

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Parkman Progenitors totaling 55,599 ancestors in GEDCOM format with Pedigree Charts and Family Groups click on the ParkmanPAF.paf GEDCOM file uploaded:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-370411831/parkman

13 Generation Parkman Pedigree Charts and Family Group Sheets:

https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE4043260

http://www.familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titledetails&titleno=271778&disp=Parkman++family++Bible++records%2C++1658%20%20&columns=*,0,0

https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/results?count=20&query=%2Bsubject_id%3A227954

Elias Parkman, American Progenitor’s Pedigree Chart and Family Groups link:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=oldmankew&id=I25537/a>

Parkman Bandstand, Boston Common, MA

November 16, 2009

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Parkman Bandstand Boston Common Aerial

Boston Back Bay from Boston Common

Parkman Bandstand Boston Common

The Parkman Bandstand was named for one of the Common’s greatest benefactors, George Francis Parkman Jr., who died in 1908 and left $5 million for the care of the Common and other city parks. The bandstand was originally dedicated in 1912 and was restored in 1996. It still hosts small events such as midday concerts, theatrical productions, weddings and speeches (Obama  in 2007). Annually, the Boston Freedom Rally is held at Parkman Bandstand, the second largest rally calling for the reform of marijuana laws in the United States. The Commonwealth Shakespeare Company puts on free plays from Parkman Bandstand, drawing as many as 100,000 theater-lovers into the park every summer.

George Parkman JR bio

Boston Common History & Map_tcm3-30691 www.cityofboston.gov

Boston Common History Map & brochure produced by the City of Boston link:

http://www.cityofboston.gov/images_documents/Boston%20Common%20History%20%26%20Map_tcm3-30691.pdf

http://www.cityofboston.gov/parks/emerald/boston_common.asp

 

George Parkman – pencil sketch

George Parkman donated his townhouse @ 33 Beacon Street, Boston (known as The Parkman House) and $ 5 Million in 1908 to the City of Boston for the perpetual maintenance of the Boston Common. Shortly thereafter the City erected The Parkman Bandstand and The Parkman Plaza consisting of 3 statues both located at the Boston Common which is America’s oldest park established in 1659. George Parkman was a Harvard graduate that was murdered by Harvard Professor Daniel White Webster. It was the first time in American history that circumstantial evidence was used (his ceramic dentures) to convict and hang a man. PBS TV made a documentary about this murder that may be watched on http://www.youtube.com

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Parkman

freedom trail boston

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The Partnership of Historic Bostons:

https://parkmangenealogy.wordpress.com/?s=Boston

http://www.historicbostons.com/

Parkman House – 33 Beacon St. , Boston, Mass.

November 16, 2009

George Parkman JR bio


The Parkman House, 33 Beacon Street, Boston (also known as the Mayor’s Official Reception Center) was donated by George Parkman (see photos 1-3 above for details). The fourth photo is of Brenda Parkman of The Parkman Cattle Company, Montgomery, AL. The fifth & sixth photos are of The Parkman Line & Parkman Reunion at Robert Parkman’s Rocky Point Farm, Salem, AL 2006 (Daniel & Theresa Parkman are front row @ right side with light blue and black shirts).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Parkman

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The Teeth above of Doctor George Parkman murdered @ Harvard:

http://murderbygasslight.blogspot.com/2010/02/murder-at-harvard.html/a>

freedom trail boston

Francis Parkman – U.S. Postage Stamp – Author of Oregon Trail & 17 books

November 15, 2009

Francis Parkman Prominent American Series 3 cent US Postage stamp first day of issue 16 Spet 1967.JPG

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Francis Parkman Prominent American Series 2.JPG

He wrote 17 Volumes/Books the most famous was “The Oregon Trail” which was essentially a diary of his trip from Boston to St. Louis with his cousin Shaw and amongst the American Indians.

Here is Wikipedia link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Parkman/a>

Here is a link to Francis Parkman’s Genealogy:

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GenMassachusetts/2008-01/1199482646/a>

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Francis Parkman – REPRESENTATIVE SELECTIONS, WITH INTRODUCTION, BIBLIOGRAPHY, AND NOTES BY WILBUR L. SCHRAMM Assistant Professor of English University of Iowa – 648 pages DIGITIZED

https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE4343562

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A life of Francis Parkman by Charles Haight Farnham – 426 pages DIGITIZED

https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE100497

St. Botolph Club – Francis Parkman, 1st President & co-Founder – 1880

November 15, 2009

199 Commonwealth Avenue • Boston, Massachusetts 02116
(617)536-7570
http://www.stbotolphclub.org/

Francis Parkman Memorial, Jamaica Plain, Mass

November 15, 2009

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Francis Parkman’s signature

francis parkman memorial jamaica plain parkman_memorial

This Francis Parkman Memorial now stands where his house foundation once was – Jamaica Plain, MA 

Francis Parkman Memorial, Francis Parkman Drive at Jamaica Pond, Jamaica Plain, MA:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Parkman+Memorial+Park,+Boston,+MA+02130/@42.3162151,-71.1261518,814m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x89e3790d7f6acb55:0x7897856ace0d84c5!8m2!3d42.3181537!4d-71.1244273

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Francis Parkman House, Jamaica Pond, Mass 1894

francis parkman house jamaica pond 1894 view from house of pond

view of Jamaica Pond from Francis Parkman house 1894

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Francis Parkman house 1894

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Francis Parkman house 1894

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Jamaica Pond & Olmstead Park  from Pond St. 1894

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Parkman Memorial

By Richard Heath

In the great council house stood the wisdom and valor of the confederacy, sachems; tall and stalwart figures limbed like Grecian statues.
Francis Parkman, The Old Regime of Canada

The first design of the Parkman Memorial was an Indian woman and an Indian man carved in deep relief on separate shafts connected by a lintel. This is a full size plaster model of the Indian maiden on display at Chesterwood. the summer home and studio of DC French at Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Photograph by Richard Heath.A majestic Iroquois stands witness on the shores of Jamaica Pond. He emerges from a single shaft of granite twenty feet high. The head and torso are cut deep into the stone while the legs, wrapped in a robe, appear to be the stone itself because of the low-cut relief. His thick left hand holds his robe and the pipe of peace. The stern face is often in shadow; the head is thrown back and his hooded eyes stare into time.

This is the memorial to Francis Parkman, American historian and summertime Jamaica Plain resident. It was designed by Daniel Chester French and carved partly on site in 1906.

Francis Parkman was born on September 16, 1893 on Beacon Hill; he spent his early years at number five Bowdoin Square. Together with the historian William H. Prescott (1796-1859), Parkman introduced American letters to the field of history written in Romantic prose, based on careful research from original manuscripts and documents.

It was as a student at Harvard that Francis Parkman determined to write about the American wilderness – the struggle for power in North America between the empires of Britain and France. “Here it seemed to me,” Parkman wrote in 1886, “the forest drama was more stirring and the forest stage more thronged … the course of the American conflict between France and England [was] the history of the American forest.”

Parkman’s fascination with the American forest was also with its people, the Eastern Woodlands Indian. This led him to read James Fenimore Cooper, the earliest American writer who, in the words of Parkman biographer Mason Wade, “recognized the importance of the Indian and the forest in the development of the nation.” Parkman’s histories took the romanticism of Cooper much further: for the historian, the Indian was a political and military power that had to be understood if the conquest of North America was to be accurately written. In that titanic struggle for continental hegemony – which was a dress rehearsal for the Revolutionary War a decade later – there were three centers of power: the French, the British, and the American Indian, principally the Iroquois Confederacy.

Parkman’s first book in the seven-volume history, Pioneers of France in the New World, was published in 1865, followed two years later by The Jesuits in North America. Jesuits opens with a chapter on the first continental power, titled “Native Tribes.” It is a 47-page study of all facets of American Indian life: tribal divisions, arts, festivals, medicines, women and families, religion, government, and most importantly to Parkman, an examination of the mighty Iroquois. In its struggle with Britain, France enlisted as allies the most significant tribe in the Northeast, the Iroquois. Of all the eastern tribes, the Iroquois were the most politically and militarily organized, and therefore to Parkman, they came closest to resembling the Europeans. This introduction, opening as it does the history of the beginning of New France, recognized that the Indian was the first of the three powers for mastery of North America. The concluding volume, A Half Century of Conflict, was published in 1892, a year before Francis Parkman’s death.

Parkman spent his life on Beacon Hill; in 1865 he moved to 50 Chestnut Street, where he kept a Sioux war bonnet, war clubs, and other Indian relics from his 1848 trip to the great West. In 1852 he bought three acres on Prince Street overlooking Jamaica Pond, and on the crest of the slope he built a summer cottage nestled among trees. In 1874 he rebuilt this house in bracket farmhouse style with truncated gable, bay windows and a veranda. The entrance drive came off Prince Street, and the grounds swept down to the pond where he had a boat dock. Flanking the pathway to the pond were lush flower beds of roses and lilies that he was famous for propagating. Francis Parkman celebrated his 70th birthday at the Jamaica Pond house on September 15, 1893, but less than two months later he died there on November 8, 1893. He was buried on Indian Ridge at Mt. Auburn Cemetery.

In 1875 the Boston Park Commissioners, with the advice of Frederick Law Olmsted, began to plan for a great system of parks for Boston. There was no doubt that Jamaica Pond had to be preserved as a public park because of its unique natural beauty, quickly being lost to icehouses and private estates. By January 1893, 65 acres had been purchased surrounding the pond for a park. Parkman’s estate was included in the acreage, but the city would not take his house and grounds while he was still alive (Parkman was offered $24,300 for his property).

In 1894 a few months after Parkman’s death, his cottage, carriage house and greenhouse were razed and the grading begun for Parkman Drive. The shoreline below the cottage was not changed, but the boat dock was removed. The 555-foot long supporting wall for Parkman Drive was built, and by the end of 1898 the Drive itself and the footpath through the old estate grounds were complete and opened to the public.

In 1895 a committee including Charles Sprague Sargent, founder and first director of the Arnold Arboretum, and Parkman’s eldest daughter Grace Parkman Coolidge, was formed and proposed a memorial to Francis Parkman on the site of his cherished summer home. The American Architect and Building News reported in its April 13, 1896 issue that “friends of the late Mr. Parkman are raising money for a monument … nothing would be more appropriate than such a memorial erected on the very scene of his labors.” It noted that $15,000 had been raised. The committee consulted with Frederick Law Olmsted, then at the end of his great career, for advice on the site. (Olmsted preferred that public art in his parks harmonize with the landscape). The committee turned to the architect Charles McKim (who had just completed the Boston Public Library) to design the memorial, but Mc Kim thought that it was one of sculpture not architecture, and he turned to his friend and library collaborator Daniel Chester French (who had designed the bronze entrance doors to the Library). McKim and French collaborated through several false starts until 1902, when McKim withdrew from the project and French proceeded alone to design the memorial.

Born in 1850 in Exeter, New Hampshire, Daniel Chester French in 1895 was in the forefront of American sculpture, largely for the acclaim he received for the Milmore Memorial of 1893 at Forest Hills Cemetery, and for The Republic, the 65-foot statue at the Court of Honor, which he designed for the 1893 Worlds Columbian Exposition in Chicago. (This is where he first met Charles McKim. French also collaborated with architects on six statuary groups for the Exposition). His first major public sculpture was the iconographic Citizen Soldier – the “Minuteman Statue” – at Concord, Mass. (1875). In 1884 his seated bronze statue of John Harvard was unveiled at Harvard Yard. When he accepted the commission for the Parkman Memorial, French was nearing completion of the John Boyle O’Reilly statue in the Back Bay Fens. Designed with the architect C. Howard Walker, it was placed in 1896 at the corner of the Fenway and Boylston Street. This was the first piece of public statuary in the Olmsted Park system. The Parkman Memorial would be the second.

The Parkman Memorial sculpture is that of an Iroquois sachem staring north across Jamaica Plain. Nothing survives to suggest that any image other than that of an American Indian was proposed to honor Parkman. Francis Parkman himself described what the proper monument should look like and no doubt his daughter Grace pointed out the words in the chapter he wrote on Indian tribes in the Conspiracy of Pontiac (1851): “Some races of men seem molded in wax, soft and feeble… but the Indian is hewn out of rock. It is in the native wilds alone that the Indian must be seen and studied. Thus to depict him is the aim of the ensuing history: and if, from the shades of rock and forest, the savage features should look too grimly forth it is because of the tempestuous clouds of war.”

The basic design we see today of a standing chief set in deep relief in a single block of granite had been roughed out by French by 1901. The concept of the figure emerging literally out of living rock was a unique sculptural style for French and in American sculpture, but it seemed to be almost an intuitive idea for him as he considered the life work of Francis Parkman. Grace Parkman Coolidge approved the bronze relief of her father that French designed and cast for the base of the shaft.

In her 1947 biography of her father, Margaret French Cresson (1889-1973) wrote about the memorial: “In the center [was] a shaft twenty feet in height with a figure of an Indian cut into the stone, the upper part in the round and projecting hardly at all beyond the face of the granite. It was a rather a new idea and very effective.” (D. C. French would carve only one other monument in deep relief, the majestic Melvin Memorial at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord, dedicated in 1908 and clearly inspired by the Parkman.) The original design had both a male and female figure standing in deep relief on separate slabs of stone connected by a stone lintel, but this idea was discarded by early 1905 for the single Indian. The model of this was approved in June 1905. The thirty-foot-long foundation for the memorial was dug on the same site as Parkman’s cottage. In 1906 the huge block of gray granite was quarried at Quincy and shipped to Boston to be carved by the master artisan Francesco C. Recchia (1859-1921) in his studio at 359 Boylston Street1. French did the final carving in October 1906, on site after it had been erected, and the memorial was completed on November 20, 1906.

When it was finally erected in 1906 after nine years of effort, the Parkman Memorial was the first public sculpture in Boston to portray a Native American. One has to literally walk up to within a few feet of the monument to see the relief and the name of Francis Parkman. This was certainly the intention; it is a monument more to the achievements of the man, than to the man himself.

In 1912, a second statue using the American Indian was designed by Cyrus Dallin. The Appeal to the Great Spirit, a great equestrian Indian sculpture, was set up at the entrance to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. The Parkman Memorial and Appeal to the Great Spirit remain the only two statues to the Native American in Boston to this day. But they are two different Indians: Dallin’s Plains chief astride his exhausted horse is doomed as he lifts his arms for deliverance. But the Iroquois that French carved for the Parkman Memorial is proud and defiant, exactly the way Francis Parkman portrayed the Indian in his histories.

Neglect and vandalism plagued Boston public art in the 1970s, and in 1973 the bronze relief of Francis Parkman was stolen. In September 1988 this writer asked the Henderson Foundation if it would underwrite the restoration of the monument and replace the plaque. In response, Henry Lee, chairman of the Adopt-a-Statue program, visited the Memorial with John Galvin of the Henderson Foundation and Mary Shannon, Executive Secretary of the Boston Art Commission. Funds were approved in 1989 and the granite was cleaned and repointed. Replacing the bronze plaque required skill and ingenuity. The original plaster cast of the plaque was lost, and the only reference was a single photograph in the archives at Chesterwood, the summer home and studio of D. C. French in Stockbridge, Mass. (owned and managed since 1969 by the National Trust for Historic Preservation).

The outline of the original plaque was still plainly visible on the base of the shaft and this was carefully traced. The photograph of the plaster cast was enlarged until it fit exactly the outline drawing. Using that as a reference, Addio de Bascari made a new plaster mold cast by sculptor Robert Shure. The new bronze plaque was installed on September 14, 1990. Mary Shannon guided all the work every step of the way.

The Parkman Memorial did not have a dedication ceremony. To correct that mistake, the Jamaica Plain Historical Society rededicated the Memorial on Francis Parkman’s birthday, September 16, 1990.

The Parkman Memorial in September 1990 shortly after restoration was complete.

The summer house of Francis Parkman from Prince Street. Photograph taken in 1894 shortly before it was razed for Jamaica Park. Courtesy of the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site.

The new plaque after installation in September 1990. Photograph by Richard Heath.

Plaster bust of Francis Parkman complete with Roman toga designed and modeled by Martin Milmore. Presented to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society in February 1876. Parkman was President of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society from 1874 to 1878 and before that was Chair of the Library Committee for a decade. It was displayed in the Trustees Room at Horticultural Hall where this photograph was taken by Richard Heath in June 1989. Afterwards, it was removed to Wellesley and put in a file room.

http://www.jphs.org/people/2005/4/14/parkman-memorial.html

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francis parkman oregon trail book

The Oregon Trail & The Conspiracy of Pontiac

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Map of the Oregon Trail from Independence, MO to Oregon City, OR

Francis Parkman Oregon Trail painting 1925 by N.C. Wyeth

Oregon Trail painting

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Oglala Sioux Indian arrows collected by Francis Parkman in 1846 on Oregon Trail

 

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Oglala Sioux Indian peace pipe collected by Francis Parkman in 1846 on Oregon Trail
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Oglala Sioux Indian shield collected by Francis Parkman in 1846 on Oregon Trail.
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Oglala Sioux Indian bow collected by Francis Parkman in 1846 on Oregon Trail.
https://earlyamericanists.com/2015/08/04/after-the-trail/
Massachussetts Historical Society has 137 items when you Search: Parkman:
http://www.masshist.org/search?terms=parkman
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Francis Parkman’s writing screen as he was poor eye sight he used orange paper and red ink.
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Oregon Trail Shoshone Indians
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Oregon Trail ox driven wagons
francis parkman OT oregon trail
francis parkman grave
Francis Parkman was buried on Indian Ridge at Mt. Auburn Cemetery.

 


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