Henry Thoreau Lived @ Parkman House Concord Mass in 1823 – 1844 when he was Writing Drafts of WALDEN POND

Henry Thoreau Walden Pond in the Fall Replica Cabin on Walden Pond & Bronze Thoreau Statue

henry david thoreau richest.jpg

Henry’s Dad John perfected the art of making lead pencils The Thoreaus were winding up their affairs in the Parkman house near (but not on) the site of the present Concord Free Public Library building, and getting ready to make other arrangements. “Made pencils in 1844.” Thoreau was preparing to go to Walden Pond to work on his first book, revising and copying the scrappy remains of his 1837-1844 volumes into the Long Book, drafting original passages of narration and description, and incorporating journal entries not originally related to the trip taken by the two brothers. http://www.kouroo.info/general/CFPL.pdf/a>

John Thoreau, Senior left off teaching school at 6 Cornhill Court in Boston, Henry David Thoreau was taken out of the Boston infant school, and theThoreaus removed from Whitwell’s house on Pinckney Street in Boston to rent the Jonas Hastings house in Concord, built in about 1790, Mr. Parkman’s brick house at the corner of Main Street and Walden Street, William Parkman was born in 1741. In 1788 William Parkman became a deacon of the 1st Parish Church of Concord. (He would serve until 1826). January 26, 1789: At Concord, the Rev. Ezra Ripley united Deacon William Parkman of Concord and Lydia Proctor of Boston in marriage. In 1823 John Thoreau, Senior left off teaching school at 6 Cornhill Court in Boston, David Henry Thoreau was taken out of the Boston infant school, and theThoreaus removed from Whitwell’s house on Pinckney Street in Boston to rent the Jonas Hastings house in Concord, built in about 1790, Deacon William Parkman’s brick house at the corner of Main Street and Walden Street, where the father would go into the pencil-making business of Dunbar & Stow that was making use of graphite that Charles Dunbar had discovered in 1821 near Bristol in New Hampshire, and also take up responsibility for the mill, milldam, race, and pond on Mill Brook just south of the “Milldam” district. Henry David Thoreau began to attend Miss Phœbe Wheeler’s infant school. Here is a later reminisce of this period in the life of the Thoreau family: “Mother reminds me that when we lived at the Parkman house she lost a ruff a yard and a half long and with an edging three yards long to it, which she had laid on the grass to whiten, and, looking for it, she saw a robin tugging at the tape string of a stay on the line. He would repeatedly get it in his mouth, fly off and be brought up when he got to the end of his tether. Miss Ward thereupon tore a fine linen handkerchief into strips and threw them out, and the robin carried them all off. She had no doubt that he took the ruff.”

http://www.kouroo.info/Thoreau/ThoreauResidences.pdf

 

Meanwhile Concord becomes, some say, the literary capital of America. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, and Nathaniel Hawthorne are the best know of many thinkers and writers in Concord. Visitors from far-off places come to discuss major issues of the day. Transcendentalism develops, and the Concord School of Philosophy is built. Thoreau documents the town’s natural history and geography, and briefly lives in a Walden Pond woodlot surrounded by intensive agriculture. Culture expands in academies, libraries, and lyceums. Voluntary associations proliferate. Women play major roles in town. Abolitionism is active and the underground railroad runs through Concord. Monuments in Monument Square and Sleepy Hollow Cemetery suggest the impact of the Civil War on Concord.

 

http://www.concordlibrary.org/scollect/bhc/bhc.html #####

 

 

Jonas Hastings House built by Deacon William Parkman in 1790 Concord, Mass (house at far right with tree front & center of house) This photograph of Concord Center, taken in about 1865, shows in the distance the Jonas Hastings house belonging to Deacon William Parkman in which the Thoreaus were to reside from 1823 to 1826, at the corner of Main and Walden Streets. As you can see, initially the Hastings corner had projected out into what is now part of Main Street, so that the house would need to be moved backward to allow Main Street to be widened prior to the opening in 1873 of the newly constructed Concord Free Public Library. (The Hastings house would ultimately be taken down to make way for the business block put up by pharmacist John C. Friend in 1892.)

http://www.kouroo.info/Thoreau/DeaconParkman.pdf

 

This had been the abode of old Deacon Parkman, a grand- uncle of the late Francis Parkman, the historian, and son of the Westborough clergyman from whom this distinguished family descends. Deacon Parkman was a merchant in Con cord, and lived in what was then a good house. It stood in the middle of the village, where the Public Library now is. The ” Texas ” house was built by Henry Thoreau and his father John ; it was named from a section of the village then called ” Texas,” because a little remote from the churches and schools ; perhaps the same odd fancy that had bestowed the name of “Virginia” on the road of Thoreau s birthplace. The ” Yellow house re-formed ” was a small cottage rebuilt and enlarged by the Thoreaus in 1850 ; in this, on the main street, Henry and his father and mother died. http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:Familiar_letters_of_Henry_David_Thoreau.djvu/29 #####
http://books.google.com/books?id=v-Qghe4gyvMC&pg=PA117&lpg=PA117&dq=thoreau+parkman&source=bl&ots=yrnnm5uX0G&sig=8zWa18uxZcduHwKk-9uuhGfisfs&hl=en&sa=X&ei=2IJuT87cCuP20gH_4KTRBg&ved=0CCkQ6AEwATgU#v=onepage&q=thoreau%20parkman&f=false/a>
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-oVgywnk84
Some evidence suggests that three structures date to the 1650’s, the Thomas Dane House (47 Lexington Rd.), Edward Bulkeley House (92 Sudbury Rd.) and Parkman Tavern (20 Powder Mill Rd. CONCORD,MASS). Speculation continues that two rooms of the Old Block House (now at 57 Lowell Rd.) might have been the home of Rev. John Jones, a town founder and resident from 1635 to 1644.
http://www.concordlibrary.org/scollect/bhc/bhc.html #####
Letter from Samuel Parkman of Boston to his brother William of Concord. Dad to both Reverend Ebenezer Parkman of Westborough. William Parkman Collection, 1760-1826 Vault A45, Parkman Unit 1 Extent: 23 items. Arrangement: Organized into two series: I. Papers, 1773-1826; II. Wallets, 1760, 1770. Papers arranged chronologically. Biography: William Parkman (1741-1832) was born in Westborough, Massachusetts (the eighth of seventeen children). He worked as a carpenter and surveyor until about 1770, when he moved to Concord, Massachusetts, and purchased a farm. In addition to his work on the farm, he served as deputy sheriff from 1770 to 1795. At this time, his farm also functioned as a tavern specifically for teamsters. In 1778, he was appointed Deacon to the First Church of Concord. In 1795, having moved close to the town center, he became a shopkeeper and postmaster, a position he held until 1810. Meanwhile, William Parkman also served as a Justice of the Peace. From 1798 to 1825, he was a member of the Social Circle in Concord. Parkman had eight children with wife Lydia Adams, to whom he was married from 1766 to 1787. He second wife (1789-1810) was Lydia Proctor. His third wife was Sarah Wheeler, who was the mother-in-law of Parkman’s fifth daughter, Sarah. They remained married from 1811 until William Parkman’s death in 1832. Scope and content: Collection (1760-1826) consists of correspondence, one writ, one receipt, and two wallets. The writ dates from William Parkman’s time as deputy sheriff and relates to the case of Sprague v. Seaver. Parkman’s correspondence consists largely of letters from his brothers, Alexander and Samuel Parkman. The letters describe the financial situation of Alexander Parkman, who is requesting or waiting for money. Samuel Parkman writes to William Parkman about their brother’s debts. Additionally, the letters provide some information about the personal lives of William and Alexander. Related to these letters is a receipt signed by Samuel Parkman acknowledging receipt of $300 from Roger Brown on the account of Alexander Parkman. The collection also contains a letter from J. Wheeler concerning items that William Parkman would like for his shop. The collection also includes one letter from William Parkman’s son William and one from Esek Marsh. (Both involve personal matters.) Accompanying the papers are two leather wallets inscribed by William Parkman: one dated 1760 and one dated 1770. Processed by: Sarah Galligan; finding aid completed 03/01/2012. Container List: Series I: Papers, 1773-1826 (in folder): All letters are addressed to William Parkman in Concord, Mass. Writ to William Parkman as Deputy Sheriff (Case of Sprague vs. Seaver) 1773 July 10. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1796 Nov. 22. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1797 April 15. ALS from J. Wheeler, Boston, Mass., 1805 May 9. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1806 May 17. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1806 Dec. 27. ALS from Samuel Parkman, Boston, Mass., 1807 May 8. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1807 May 9. ALS from Samuel Parkman, Boston, Mass., 1807 May 25. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1807 June 21. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1807 September 12. ALS from Samuel Parkman, Boston, Mass., 1898 January 19. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1808 May 7. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1808 July 12. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1808 September 3. ALS from Alexander Parkman, Westmoreland, N.Y., 1808 December 17. ALS from Samuel Parkman, Boston, Mass., 1809 February 9. ALS from Samuel Parkman, Boston, Mass., 1809 February 18. Receipt signed by Samuel Parkman acknowledging receipt of $300 from Roger Brown on the account of Alexander Parkman, 1808 February 13. ALS from William Parkman, Camden, Maine, to his father William in Concord, Mass., 1818 Sept. 28. ALS from Esek Marsh, Holliston, Mass. 1826 April 8. Series II: Wallets, 1760, 1770 (in artifact box): Wallet inscribed “Wm Parkman 1760.” Wallet inscribed “Wm Parkman 1770.”
http://www.concordlibrary.org/scollect/Fin_Aids/parkman.html
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4 Responses to “Henry Thoreau Lived @ Parkman House Concord Mass in 1823 – 1844 when he was Writing Drafts of WALDEN POND”

  1. Heather Martino Says:

    Hi! My name is Heather Martino – I am a historic guide at the Old Manse in Concord MA and am working on a pictorial “then and now” style book with my manager. I was looking for an old image of Concord and love the image that refers to the “Jonas Hastings House”. Do you know where this came from and if there is a high resolution version of it somewhere? I have been working with the Library and other long running families that have old pictures and cannot seem to find this one you have. Warm regards!

  2. Dawna Pine Says:

    Hello,

    I have moved to Camden, Maine recently and I live in a house built in 1800 by William Parkman, from Concord. I have been told he had originally been a ship’s carpenter and he built the house and the carriage house for himself and his family. He prospered here in Camden. His son William bought the house from him. Does any of this sound familiar to any of your Parkman ancestors? Be happy to hear from you.

    • Daniel M. Parkman, Sr. Says:

      a William Parkman is in my family tree. Alexander Parkman was American Rev Leuitenant and Minuteman that had house in Westmoreland, Onieda County/Fingerlakes NY.

      just found a Parkman Tavern, Concord Mass.

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