Archive for March, 2009

Oath of a Freeman – Elias Parkman & William Trask – Ancestors

March 23, 2009

elias-parkman-co-founderwindsor-ct_2

elias-parkman-co-founderwindsor-ct_4

elias-parkman-co-founderwindsor-ct_3

Elias Parkman sailed from Sidmouth (Sydmouth), Devonshire, England in 1630 on the ship Mary & John. Then in 1635 he became a FREEMAN and took the following Oath of a Freeman. That same year he was one of the original 48 cofounders of Windsor CT, the oldest town in the state.

https://parkmangenealogy.wordpress.com/2009/11/15/elias-parkman-co-founder-of-windsor-ct/

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027883&familyTreeID=2

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/family?cfpid=290024884173

Freemen made at the General Court, May 6th, 1635.

Philemon Portmorte
Henry Elkines
Christopher Martiall
Edmond Bulckley
Edward Browne
Jarrett Bourne
William Pell
Benjamin Gillom
Thomas Alcocke
Edmonde Jacklinge
John Sebley
Thomas Peirce
Mr. Sachariah Syms
Barnaby Wynes
Jeffery Ferris
Thomas Gunn
Robert Dibell
Henry Fowkes
Elias Parkeman

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The Freemen of Massachusetts Bay
1630 – 1636

Redacted and introduced by Marcia Stewart.

A primary goal of The Winthrop Society is to determine the identities of the first settlers of Massachusetts Bay Commonwealth. There are no firmer grounds for establishing an early settler among the founders of the Commonwealth than the lists of the first Freemen — those who applied for that estate in Boston in October, 1630, and those so sworn thereafter. The Freemen were the only colonists who were franchised to vote, and the franchise was not offered to all. One generally had to be a mature male church-member, and must have experienced a transforming spiritual experience by God’s grace, as attested by himself and confirmed by church leaders. Therefore, the list of names below represents just a small percentage of the population. And apparently, a number of qualifying church-members would not take the oath because they had problems with the wording. An oath in those times was taken very seriously, as though it were a promise made directly to the Almighty with ones soul forfeit in the breach. Numerous persons who are on church and court records of 1630-1632 did not take the oath until 1634, when the oath was shortened and modified to replace the persons of the Governor etc. to whom obedience was due with the impersonal “common weale.” Others, such as those who later became Quakers, objected strongly to oaths in general. One can understand all their reservations when one reads this “mother of all American loyalty oaths,” below.
The Oath of a Freeman, or of a Man to be made free.

I, A B, etc., being, by the Almighty’s most wise disposition, become a member of this body, consisting of the Governor, Deputy Governor, Assistants and a commonalty of the Mattachusets in New England, do freely and sincerely acknowledge that I am justly and lawfully subject to the government of the same, and do accordingly submit my person and estate to be protected, ordered, and governed by the laws and constitutions thereof, and do faithfully promise to be from time to time obedient and conformable thereunto, and to the authority of the said Governor and Assistants and their successors, and to all such laws, orders, sentences, and decrees as shall be lawfully made and published by them or their successors; and I will always endeavor (as in duty I am bound) to advance the peace and welfare of this body or commonwealth to my utmost skill and ability; and I will, to my best power and means, seek to divert and prevent whatsoever may tend to the ruin or damage thereof, or of any the said Governor, Deputy Governor, or Assistants, or any of them or their successors, and will give speedy notice to them, or some of them, of any sedition, violence, treachery, or other hurt or evil which I shall know, hear, or vehemently suspect to be plotted or intended against the said commonwealth, or the said government established; and I will not at any time suffer or give consent to any counsel or attempt that shall be done, given, or attempted for the impeachment of the said government, or making any change alteration of the same, contrary to the laws and ordinances thereof, but shall do my utmost endeavor to discover, oppose, and hinder all and every such counsel and attempt. So help me God.
Applied for Freeman Status, October 19th, 1630

What follows is the entire record of the Court of the session of October 19, 1630. This occasion was nothing less than the birth of democracy on the American continent. The men that applied for freemen status were mostly arrived in 1630 with the Winthrop fleet and the Mary & John. However, the earlier arrivals are also represented here, and this list contains many of the surviving settlers from the the Abigail and the Higginson fleet, as well as a few who came before 1628.

All names were inscribed by the Court clerk, and give an indication of the pronunciation, if not the oath-taker’s prefered spelling of his name. The spelling of surnames and most prenames is given here as originally written down, but we have replaced abbreviated prenames by the common full spelling. Where prenames were omitted, they are inserted here in italics. The order of the names as written down originally can be seen here. There is no apparent indication of their social status in the order of the names, but some of the earliest settlers appear first, and study has revealed groupings according to the MBC township of origin.
At General Court, holden at Boston the 19th of October, 1630

Present,
The Governor (John Winthrop)
The deputy Governor (Thomas Dudley)
Sir Richard Saltonstall
Mr. (Roger) Ludlowe
Capt. (John) Endicott
Mr. (Increase) Nowell
Mr. (William) Pinchon
Mr. (Simon) Bradstreete

For establishing the government, it was propounded if it were not the best course that the Freemen should have the power of choosing Assistants when there are to be chosen, and the Assistants from among themselves to choose a Governor and a Deputy Governor, who with the Assistants should have the power of making laws and choosing officers to execute the same. This was fully assented unto by the general vote of the people and erection of hands.

Ralfe Sprage is chosen constable of Charlton, John Johnson of Rocksbury, and John Page for Waterton, for the space of one whole year, and after till new be chosen.

It is ordered that the sawyers shall not take above 12d a score for sawing oak boards, and 10d a score for pine boards if they have their wood felled and scored for them.

Walter Palmer made his personal appearance this day, and stands bound, he and his sureties, till the next Court.

The names of such as desire to be made Freeman

Mr. Samuell Mavracke
Mr. Edward Johnson
Mr. Edward Gibbins
Mr. William Jeffries
Mr. John Burslin
Mr. Samuel Sharpe
Mr. Thomas Graves
Mr. Roger Conant
John Woodbury
Peter Palfrey
Mr. Nathaniel Turner
Mr. Samuel Freeman
Eprahim Childe
Mr. William Clerke
Mr. Abraham Palmer
John Page
Nicholas Upsall
Stephen Terree
Henry Smyth
Roger Williams (Roger Williams of Dorchester, not the Minister and later founder of Rhode Island.)
John Woolridge
Thomas Lumberd
Bigatt Egglestone
John Grinoway
Christopher Gibson
John Benham
Thomas Williams alias Harris
Richard Garrett
John Howman
John Crabb
Capt. Walter Norton
Mr. Alexander Wignall
Mr. William Jennison
Mr. Thomas Southcoate
Mr. Richard Southcoate
James Pemberton
Mr. John Dillingham
John Johnson
Mr. Robert Coles
Jehu Burr
Thomas Rawlins
Richard Bugby
Richards Hutchins
Ralfe Mushell
Thomas Lambe
William Throdingham
William Chase
(Richard) Foxewell
Mr. Charles Gott
Henry Harwood
Mr. George Phillips
Mr. John Wilson
Mr. John Mavracke
Mr. Robert Feake
Mr. William Pelham
Mr. Benjamin Brand
Mr. William Blackstone
Mr. Edmond Lockwood
Mr. Richard Browne
John Strickland
Ralfe Sprage
Mr. George Ludlowe
James Penn
Henry Woolcott
Thomas Stoughton
William Phelpes
George Dyar
John Hoskins
Thomas Ford
Mr. John Warham
Mr. Samuell Skelton
Mr. William Colbron
Mr. William Aspinwall
Edward Converse
Mr. Richard Palgrave
John Taylour
Richard Church
Richard Silvester
William Balstone
Robert Abell
Mr. Giles Sexton
Robert Seely
John Mills
John Cranwell
Mr. Ralfe Glover
William Hulbird
Edmond James
John Pillips
Nathaniell Bowman
John Doggett
Laurence Leach
Charles Chadwicke
William Drakenbury
John Drake
John Balshe
Mr. Samuell Coole
Mr. William Traske

Two separate groups were sworn on May 14th, 1634, and this redactor is uncertain of the reason. One might speculate that, after the first group, above, was sworn by the Oath of 1631, the New Oath was proposed by the larger second group containing many worthies and first settlers, including the notable ministers Thomas Hooker and Samuel Stone, and was then adopted by the Court. At that same session, we note also that Thomas Dudley replaced the more conservative John Winthrop as Governor, and the powerful and persuasive Rev. John Cotton (among the second group of Freemen, below) was heard to speak on constitutional issues.

As was noted above, the Oath of 1631 was considered unreasonably demanding to many of the first settlers, and the Oath in 1634 was reworded to make allegiance binding to the Commonwealth, but not to the persons of the present government, and also allowed the oath-taker’s conscience to bear in its interpretation.

A significant portion of the first settlers of the Colony refused the first oath, but are found on the following lists of 1634 and 1635, among more recently arrived settlers. Below is the New Oath, and a list of all who took the New Oath in this and the subsequent court sessions up to the end of the Julian year 1635/36.
The Oath of Freeman agreed upon at the General Court, May 14, 1634.

I, A&B, being by God’s providence an inhabitant and freeman within the jurisdiction of this common weale, do freely acknowledge myself to be subject to the government thereof, and therefore do hereby swear by the great and dreadful name of the ever-living God that I will be true and faithful to the same, and will accordingly yield assistance and support thereunto, with my person and estate, as in equity I am bound, and will also truly endeavor to maintain and preserve all the privileges and liberties thereunto, submitting myself to the wholesome laws made and established by the same. And further, that I will not plot nor practise any evil against it, nor consent to any that shall be so done, but will timely discover and reveal the same to lawful authority now here established for the speedy preventing thereof. Moreover, I do solemnly bind myself in the sight of God that when I shall be called to give my voice touching any such matter of this State, wherein Freemen are to deal, I will give my vote and suffrage as I shall in my own conscience judge best to produce and tend to the public weale of the body, without respect of persons or respect of any man. So help me God in the Lord Jesus Christ.

Freemen made at the General Court, May 6th, 1635.

Philemon Portmorte
Henry Elkines
Christopher Martiall
Edmond Bulckley
Edward Browne
Jarrett Bourne
William Pell
Benjamin Gillom
Thomas Alcocke
Edmonde Jacklinge
John Sebley
Thomas Peirce
Mr. Sachariah Syms
Barnaby Wynes
Jeffery Ferris
Thomas Gunn
Robert Dibell
Henry Fowkes
Elias Parkeman

http://winthropsociety.com/doc_freemen.php

 

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Oath_of_a_Freeman

Salem MA founder Roger Conant

Captain William Trask

trask family desk sothebys auction N08710-225-lr-1

Captain William Trask was a fisherman who came with the Dorchester Company to Cape Ann in 1624. He came on the Zouch Phenix from Weymouth, England. When the Dorchester Company folded they offered the fisherman the opportunity to return to England. He, along with others moved down the Massachusetts coastline to a place the Indians called “Maumkeg.” It later became a charter for the settlement. It became known as “The Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England.” In 1629, he was a member of the First Church in Salem. On October 19, 1630, he petitioned the court to be a freeman. On November 7, 1632, he appointed, along with seven others, to set boundaries between Roxbury and Dorchester. In 1634 he was made a Captain in the Militia.

https://parkmangenealogy.wordpress.com/2009/03/08/captain-william-trask-cofounder-of-salem-ma/

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027883&familyTreeID=2

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/family?cfpid=290024880697

winthrop society

The Winthrop Society

winthrop society 3

Winthrop Society 2 WinthropSocietyMiniature.png

http://winthropsociety.com/index.php

See page 239:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=loc.ark:/13960/t9377hm11;view=1up;seq=253

Mark Hoffman Oath of a Freeman Mormon Murders trackingp121_oathofafreeman

Mark Hoffman’s “Oath of a Freeman” forgery:

https://2012patriot.wordpress.com/2016/01/23/mormon-murders/

Coffin Family Tree & Coat of Arms

March 16, 2009

Tristram Coffin was 1 of 8 original owners of Nantucket Island in 1659 for 2 beaver hats and 30 pounds sterling (coins). The 8 had purchased Nantucket from The Mayhews. William Parkman, father of Reverend Ebenezer Parkman, married Elizabeth Adams who’s parents were Alexander Adams and Mary Coffin of Nantucket, sister of Tristram Coffin, Sr. co-founder of Nantucket.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8449256

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Generation Thirteen
Dec 1 1627, Peter Coffin – Brixton England, will proved Mar 13 1628, To Joan, land during her life, and at her decease to go to his son and heir Tristam, ‘who is to be provided for according to his degree and calling’. To son John certain property when 20 years of age. mentions daughters, Joan, Deborah, Eunice, Mary. He refers to tenement in Butlers parish called Silverhay. *May 1661- His widow Joan died in Boston Mass. The Rev. Mr. Wilson who preached the funeral sermon spoke of her as a woman of remarkable character. One Hundred Sixty Allied Families by John 0. Austin ** was born in 1584 at Brixton, Devon, England. He married Joan Kember, daughter of Robert Kember and Anne (  ?  ), in 1604 at Brixton, Devon, England. He died in 1628.

Children of Peter Coffin and Joan Kember were as follows:
(1605-1688) Christian; married Thomas Davis.
(1609-1681)Tristam, born at Plymouth, Devonshire, England; married Dionis Stevens. (see bellow)
(1611-1681) Joan; married Joseph Hull; born at Brixton, Devonshire England.
(1613)Peter.
(1616) Deborah; born at Brixton, Devonshire, England; married William Stevens, son of Robert Stevens and Dionis (  ?  ), 25 Jun 1640 at England.
(1617-1648) Eunice; born at Brixton, Devonshire, England; married William Butler after 1642.
(1619) Mary, born at Brixton, Devonshire, England; married Alexander Adams.
(1625)John; born at England; died 1642 at Plymouth Fort.

http://coffinnz.blogspot.com/2012/12/medieval-line-before-tristrams-move-to.html

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coffin coat of arms

Coffin Coat of Arms

This Coat of Arms is considered the correct Armorial Bearings for the Coffins in America. Adopted by Tristram Coffyn (1609-1681), and featured on the front cover of “The Coffin Saga” by Will Gardner. Although the edition I have is a light silvery blue, and the Coat of Arms is blue.

There are any number of versions of Armorial Bearings for the Coffins, but according to the actual rules, the proper awarded version is technically the only one that can be “used” by the appropriate Coffin line. For example, Sir Isaac Coffin, Baronet was awarded a very specific Coat of Arms for his use as well as any of his dependents.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=10904410&PIpi=115547306

1686   Oldest House and Mary Gardner Coffin
This portrait, attributed to the Pollard Limner, depicts Mary Gardner Coffin (1670-1767). Mary Gardner was born on Nantucket and married Jethro Coffin, grandson of Tristram, in 1686. Their home, built later that year, is still standing on Nantucket. Now known as the Oldest House, it is owned and operated by the Nantucket Historical Association. The Coffin/Gardner marriage symbolized the end of an early conflict in Nantucket society involving their families that was known as the “half-share revolt.” John Gardner and Tristram Coffin were key figures in Nantucket’s early governance. Coffin represented the “full-share” men, or original founders of Nantucket, while Gardner was one of a group of tradesmen who came to work on the island but received only half-shares. Bitter debates between the full-share and half-share parties raged on Nantucket about land rights, who could hold public office, and the future directions for the island. A tentative compromise between the two factions was reached in 1678, but it was not until Coffin’s death in 1681 and the eventual marriage of his grandson into the Gardner family that a full resolution of this conflict occurred.

http://www.nha.org/library/hn/HN-winter2000-timeline.htm

 

 

Nantucket marker for Tristram Coffin’s Homestead

Tristram Coffin spoon likeness 1642

Tristram Coffin Medallion – 1642

Tristram Coffin (or Coffyn)[fn 1] (ca. 1609 – 2 October 1681) was an immigrant to Massachusetts from England. In 1659 he led a group of investors that bought Nantucket from Thomas Mayhew for thirty pounds and two beaver hats.[2]He became a prominent citizen of the settlement. A great number of his descendants became prominent in North American society, and many were involved in the later history of Nantucket during and after its heyday as a whaling center.[3] Almost all notable Americans with roots in Nantucket are descended from Tristram Coffin, although Benjamin Franklin was an exception.[4]

England, 1605–1642[edit]

Tristram Coffin was born to Peter and Joanna (Kember) Coffin and baptized in the parish of Brixton near Plymouth, England, on 11 March 1609/10.[1] He belonged to the landed gentry.[5] He married Dionis Stevens in 1630 and they were to have nine children, the first five born in England. Coffin was a Brixton church warden from 1639 to 1640, and was a constable in 1641.[6]

Charles I inherited the throne of England in 1625 and initiated a long struggle with his parliament, which wanted to abolish bishops from the House of Lords and limit the king’s powers. Things came to a head when Charles raised his royal standard at Nottingham in August 1642, and England soon descended into Civil War(1642–1651).[5] Tristram Coffin’s only brother John received a mortal wound at Plymouth fort, although it is not known exactly when or even which side he was fighting on.[7] Perhaps for reasons associated with these political upheavals, Tristram Coffin decided to leave his estates in England and emigrate to the new world.[8]

Massachusetts, 1642–1659[edit]

Tristram Coffin sailed to Boston in 1642 with his wife and children, his two sisters and his mother. For a short time he ran an inn in Salisbury, Massachusetts.[1] He then moved to the new settlement of Pentucket, now Haverhill, Massachusetts. His name appears on a deed dated 15 November 1642 recording the sale of the land for the settlement by the local American Indian people. He is said to have used a plow that he had made himself to cultivate the land.[9] It was here that his last four children were born.[6]

In 1648 he left the farm and moved to Newbury, Massachusetts. Here he operated a ferry across the Merrimack River and he and his wife ran a tavern. In 1653 his wife was “presented” for selling beer above the legal price of two pennies per quart. However, she was acquitted when it was found that her beer was much stronger than the ordinary.[10] Coffin sold the inn and ferry in 1654 or 1655 and moved to Salisbury, Massachusetts, where he signed himself “Tristram Coffyn, Commissioner of Salisbury”.[11]

Nantucket, 1659–1681[edit]

Tristram Coffin Jr. House, built in Newburycirca 1678

Jethro Coffin House, built in 1686 for Jethro Coffin, Tristam Coffin’s grandson, and now the oldest house on Nantucket

Tristram Coffin and other Salisbury investors bought Nantucket island from Thomas Mayhew on 2 July 1659.[12] The purchase price was 30 pounds plus two beaver hats made by his son, also called Tristram. Coffin was the prime mover of the enterprise and was given first choice of land. In 1659 he settled near the western end of the island near Capaum pond.[6] His sons Peter Coffin, Tristram Coffin Junior and James Coffin also received land on the island.[13] Soon after settling, Tristram Coffin purchased the thousand-acre Tuckernuck Island at the western end of Nantucket. On 10 May 1660 the sachems conveyed title to a large part of the island to Coffin and his associates for eighty pounds.[14] He built a corn mill in which he employed many of the local Native Americans, and he employed others on his farm.[15]

In 1671 Coffin and Thomas Macy were selected as spokesmen for the settlers, going to New York in 1671 to meet withGovernor Francis Lovelace and secure their claim to Nantucket.[6] As the most wealthy and respected of the settlers, Coffin was appointed chief magistrate of Nantucket on 29 June 1671.[16] In 1677 he was again appointed chief magistrate for a term of four years.[17]

Legacy[edit]

Tristram Coffin died on 2 October 1681 at the age of 76.[1] During the years before his death, he had bestowed much of his property on his children and grandchildren.[18] He was buried on his property on Nantucket Island.[6] At his death he left seven children, 60 grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. One of his grandchildren calculated that by the year 1728, the number of his descendants was 1582, of whom 1128 were still alive.[19]

Several of his descendants achieved prominence. His daughter Mary Coffyn Starbuck became a leader in introducing Quaker practices into Nantucket.[20] A grandson, James Coffin, was the first of the Coffins to enter into the whaling business.[21] A poem by Thomas Worth written in 1763 says six Captains named Coffin were sailing out of Nantucket.[3]Sir Isaac Coffin (1759–1839) served during the American Revolutionary War and the Napoleonic Wars and became an admiral in the British Royal Navy.[22] He founded a school on the island in 1827 to educate descendants of Tristram Coffin – which included almost all the children on the island – with emphasis on nautical skills.[23]

Some branches of the Coffin family were prominent in New England, grouped among the so-called Boston Brahmins.[24]For example, Elizabeth Coffin, daughter of a wealthy merchant from Nantucket, was mother of the prominent Massachusetts industrialists Henry Coffin Nevins andDavid Nevins, Jr..[25] Charles A. Coffin (1844–1926) born in Somerset, Massachusetts, became cofounder and first President of General Electric corporation.[26]Some retained the family links to Nantucket after the whaling industry had collapsed and many people had left the island. In the eighth generation, Elizabeth Coffin(1850–1930), an artist, educator and Quaker philanthropist, was known for her paintings of Nantucket and for helping revive Sir Isaac Coffin’s school with a new emphasis on crafts.[27] Among the ninth generation, Robert P. T. Coffin (1892-1955) was an American Poet who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1936 for his book of collected poems called “Strange Holiness”.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. Jump up^ Tristam always spelled his name “Coffyn” but his descendants used “Coffin” as do most sources on his life[1]
Sources

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tristram_Coffin_(settler)

Tristram Coffin signature

Tristram Coffin signature

nantucket-monument early settlers

Nantucket Early Settlers Monument – Tristram Coffin 1609 – 1681

Nantucket wives mothers children monument 2009 350th anniversary settlement.jpg

 

Tristram Coffin & Dionis Stevens: Nantucket settlers

(Coastal families/Coffin branch)

* Tristram COFFIN was born in 1609 in Brixton Parish, Devon, England; christened on 11 Mar 1609 in Brixton Parish, Devonshire, England; died on 2 Oct 1681 in Nantucket, MA; buried in Maxey Pond Burying Ground, Nantucket, MA.

Tristram COFFIN married Dionis STEVENS in ABT 1630 in Brixton Parish, Devon, England. They had the following children: Peter COFFIN (b. 1631), Tristram COFFIN Jr. (b. 1632), Elizabeth COFFIN, James COFFIN (b. 12 Aug 1640), Mary COFFIN (b. 20 Feb 1645), ♥ John COFFIN Lieut. (b. 13 Oct 1647), Stephen COFFIN (b. 11 May 1652).

BIRTH: Tristram was the 1st of 6 children born to his parents.

EVENT: Tristram inherited real-estate, rents, lodging, food, a personal income and personal property upon the death of his father, Peter Coffin. In his Will, dated 21 Dec 1627 and proved 13 Mar 1627/8 Peter leaves Tristram the following; “…Item I give and bequeth unto Tristram Coffyn my Sonne one feather bedd pformed my best brasen panne and my best brasen crocke. Item I give and bequeth unto Johan Coffyn my wife y issues pfitts and comodities of all my lands tenements & hereditaments wth y sayd Parish of Brixton dureing her widdowhood she yeelding & paying therefor yearly unto the said Tristram my sonne his heirs and assignes the summe of Fifty shillings of lawful English money at y four usual feasts of the year and also sufficient meate drinke & clothes and convenient lodgings unto y sayd Tristram according to his degree and calling dureing her Widowhood…Item I doe give unto Sonne Tristram All my lands rents reversions services & hereditamts with the appurtenances whatsoever sett lying & being wth in the sayd Parish of Brixton or elsewhere wthin y sayd County of Devon…Item All y rest of my goods chattels and cattells nor before given nor bequethed I doe give and bequethe unto Johan Coffyn my wife…”{D5}

IMMIGRATION: Fourteen years after his father’s death: Tristram Coffin came to New World in 1642 with wife, Dionis; their 5 small children; his widowed mother, Joan Thember; and 2 unmarried sisters.{D2}

HOME:
The family first settled in Haverhill, then removed to Newbury in 1648, then to Salisbury, before moving to Nantucket in 1659.
“He soon bought land up the Merrimac River. The Indians had rights, but were willing to sell; their chief, Passaconaway gave his consent and there was a deed passed between which involved 14 miles along the river for 3 Pounds and 10 Shillings. That area became Haverhill, MA. He later went back to Newberry, MA, bought land, put in a ferry with an inn. Then he later got a good buy on a big grant near Dover. It was woodland on the Cochecho River. With his sons he established a lumber mill as he never wanted to hold land alone. Tristram had lost faith in England in the quarrels between king and parliament. His land holdings in England dried up. In a talk with Thomas Mayhew he found Nantucket was available; so he approached Edward Starbuck, Thomas Macy and Isaac Coleman as the core of a company which bought Nantucket for 30 pounds and 2 beaver hats. With the lumber mill, they started a small ship building project. That was very convenient to ship materials to Nantucket…”{D2} Also consult, History of Nantucket by Alexander Starbuck and The Coffin Saga by Will Gardner.
The early settler’s lots on Nantucket were about 1,000 feet on a side, while some were quite irregular in shape. Tristram’s house lot was a tract bounded on the north by Cappam Harbor. He called this region Northam or Cappamet. The spot where his house was placed is marked by a stone monument. {D4}

LIVELIHOOD: Tristram was an entrepreneurial businessman involved with land trading, a lumber mill, ship building, shipping, salvaging wrecked ships and commercial fishing. In general, the early families on Nantucket gained a livelihood through a combination farming and fishing related enterprises.

ORGANIZATIONS: Tristram was Chief Magistrate of Nantucket ca 1671-1673. He held a second term as Chief Magistrate in 1777.{D1}

HISTORICAL EVENTS:
A feud broke out amongst the early settlers of Nantucket. On one side, the Coffin’s and their friends, on the other side, the brothers Richard and John Gardner and their friends. The feud is thought to have developed from the divergent temperaments of Tristram and Capt. John Gardner. Tristram was a natural leader, but had tendencies to be irritable and despotic. Capt. John Gardner was a man of physical courage, rugged honesty and democratic in his dealings, traits that gained him public confidence. {D4}
The estrangement between the Coffin and the Gardner families ended soon after Tristram’s death in 1681. Tristram’s eldest grandson Jethro and Jethro’s brother, Edward, married Mary and Anna Gardner. After 1681, James, another grandson of Tristram, married Love Gardner and later married, Ruth Gardner. Six other children of Richard Gardner married grandchildren of Tristram Coffin, among these, Tristram’s grandson, Samuel Coffin, married Richard Gardner’s daughter, Miriam and became my direct ancestors.{D1)

[Image above: Tristram & Dionis Coffin’s house ( ? Tristram Coffin, Jr. see link below) , originally built by Tristram as a simple structure in about 1654, at 15 High Road in Newbury Massachusetts. The house is well-preserved and is a New England historic site owned by the Historic New England museum. The house is often featured in books about Colonial American architecture. This public domain photograph was taken circa 1907.Added by: Cindy K. Coffin 6/06/2009]

https://parkmangenealogy.wordpress.com/2009/03/09/tristram-coffin-house-newbury-ma/

[Image at left: Hearth in Tristram Coffin house, Newbury, MA.]

Early in 1659 Tristram went to Martha’s Vineyard where he took Peter Folger the Grandfather of Benjamin Franklin as an interpreter of the Indian language and went to Nantucket to ascertain the temper of the Indians and the capabilities of the island so that he could report to the citizens of Salisbury. At Martha’s Vineyard he entered into preliminary negotiations with Thomas Mayhew for the purchase of the island before visiting it. After his  visit to the island he made additional arrangements for its purchase and returned to Salisbury where his report upon the condition of the island, the character of the Indians and the advantages of a change of residence, was laid before his friends and associates. A company was organized for the immediate purchase of the whole island allowing Thomas Mayhew to retain a one-tenth portion with some other reservations. Several meetings of the
purchasers were held at Salisbury and general rules for the government of the island were adopted.

[Photos above: Marker locating the previous site of Tristram Coffin’s home by Capaum Harbor, by 1989 a land locked pond near the ocean, on Nantucket Island.]
Among the eight original owners of Nantucket island, he became the most prominent. He was granted first choice of land and in 1659, he settled on the eastern slope of what is now called Trott’s Hills, near Capaum Pond, toward the western end if the island. He was a leader among the first settlers and was
often asked by other inhabitants to transact important public business. He and Thomas Macy were the spokesmen for the settlement and were selected by the settlers go to New York and meet with Governor Lovelace and secure their claim to the Island in 1671. His letters to the Colonial Government of New York are preserved in the Archives of the Department of State at Albany. He built a corn mill and employed many Native Americans who were the aboriginal inhabitants of the island.

BURIAL: Tristram Coffin, Richard Gardner, Edward Starbuck and presumably their wives and others are buried at the old Maxey Pond Burying Ground. A 6+ foot high “Early Settlers Monument” stands at the site with the inscription: “Erected AD 1881 By A Descendant of the First Settlers of Nantucket in Memory of Those Whose Remains Are Buried on this Hallowed Spot Where stood the First Church Gathered Here 1711 Since Removed to where it Now Stands as the vestry of the First Congregational Society…”. The monument also is inscribed with the names of ten early settlers, including those mentioned above. The settlement and church /burial ground at Maxey Pond/Capum Harbor was, in the early days of the settlement, called “Sherburne”. Sherburne was located about two miles west of the present town of Nantucket.

DOCUMENTS:
1. The Coffin Family by Louis Coffin, 1962, Nantucket Historical Society, Nantucket, MA., p. 81.
2.”The Anderson Story”, by Mrs. C. J. Davis, Mrs. Cora May Boots and others, printed in 1968.
3. Tristram Coffin’s vital statistics are verified by a 6+ foot tall grave yard monument at Maxey Pond Burying Ground, Nantucket,MA.
4. Nantucket Lands and Land Owners Vol. 2., Bulletin No.1., by Henry Barnard Worth, Published by the Nantucket Historical Assn., 1901.
5. Early Settlers of Nantucket by Lydia Swain Mitchell Hinchman. The original may be found in the District Registry attached to the Probate Division of the Court of Justice of Exeter (in the Arcdeaconry Court of Totnes), England.
Individual source: The Anderson Story, by Mrs. C. J. Davis, Mrs. Cora May Boots and others, printed in 1968. A 67 page genealogical record of the Anderson family from John & Elizabeth Horney Anderson, ca 1800 to 1968.

* Dionis STEVENS was born in 1613; died on 6 Nov 1684 in Nantucket, MA.

Dionis Stevens was daughter of Robert, Esquire of Brixton, England.

EVENT: The records indicate that the Coffin, Starbuck and Macy families found their environment in Massachusetts Bay, far from congenial. Each had their own peculiar problem. Macy had been arrested and charged with violating town regulations see below) , and so had Coffin’s wife, Dionis. It is likely that the family was ready to move to a more liberal neighborhood when the opportunity to settle on Nantucket Island arose.{D1}
In 1683 his wife Dionis was presented at Court for selling beer for 3 cents a quart. The law provided that inn keepers should always be provided with good wholesome beer of four bushels of malt to the hhd., to be sold at not above two cents a quart under a penalty of 40 shilings. It was proved on the testimony of
Samuel Mooers however that she had put six bushels of malt to the hhd. and was accordingly discharged because she had kept the proportion good, After this, Tristram returned to Salisbury and became a County Magistrate.

DEATH: Dionis survived her husband and died on Nantucket Island; however, accounts of her death place the date variably at 16 Oct 1676 and 6 Nov 1684.

DOCUMENTS:
1. Nantucket Lands and Land Owners, Vol. 2., Bulletin No.1., by Henry Barnard Worth, Published by the Nantucket Historical Assn., 1901.
Individual source: The Coffin Family by Louis Coffin, 1962, Nantucket Historical Society, Nantucket, MA.

 

https://4dtraveler.net/2011/08/14/tristram-coffin-dionis-stevens-nantucket-settlers/

portledge manor coffin manor england.jpg

Portledge Manor, The house sits on the edge of Bideford Bay, looking out over the Bristol Channel. The parish of Alwington, Devon, England and the surrounding area was given to the family by William the Conqueror, as part of a reward for loyalty and service during the Norman Conquest. Most of the current house dates from the 17th century, but parts of it have stood since the reign of King Henry III, circa 1234 .

Nantucket whalebone 2007

Nantucket whalebone 2007

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Tristram_Coffin_Medal

Tristram Coffin was the American progenitor of the Coffin Family who was also a co-owner/founder of Nantucket.

Tristram Coffin, Sr. was 1 of 8 original owners of Nantucket Island in 1659 for 2 beaver hats and 30 pounds sterling (coins). The 8 had purchased Nantucket from The Mayhews.

Trystram Coffin Sr.’s sister, Mary Coffin married Alexander Adams, who’s daughter Elizabeth Adams married William Parkman, parents of Reverend Ebenezer Parkman.

William Parkman (Elizabeth Adams & William Parkman, Mary Coffin & Alexander Adams,  are all 4 buried @ Copp’s Hill Cemetery in Boston).

Immigrant logo

Tristram Coffin, Sr., Mary Coffin Adams and Alexander Adams were both Immigrants from England:

https://www.geni.com/people/Mary-Adams/6000000005232467530

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8449256

1686   Oldest House and Mary Gardner Coffin
This portrait, attributed to the Pollard Limner, depicts Mary Gardner Coffin (1670-1767). Mary Gardner was born on Nantucket and married Jethro Coffin, grandson of Tristram, in 1686. Their home, built later that year, is still standing on Nantucket. Now known as the Oldest House, it is owned and operated by the Nantucket Historical Association. The Coffin/Gardner marriage symbolized the end of an early conflict in Nantucket society involving their families that was known as the “half-share revolt.” John Gardner and Tristram Coffin were key figures in Nantucket’s early governance. Coffin represented the “full-share” men, or original founders of Nantucket, while Gardner was one of a group of tradesmen who came to work on the island but received only half-shares. Bitter debates between the full-share and half-share parties raged on Nantucket about land rights, who could hold public office, and the future directions for the island. A tentative compromise between the two factions was reached in 1678, but it was not until Coffin’s death in 1681 and the eventual marriage of his grandson into the Gardner family that a full resolution of this conflict occurred.

http://www.nha.org/library/hn/HN-winter2000-timeline.htm

 

 

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knight

Sir Richard Coffin / Coffyn and Pedigree Charts from the years 1066 – 1101 :

https://www.geni.com/people/Sir-Richard-Coffyn/6000000010757581673

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Coffin of Devon 1291 1579 Knights of the Crown

A Coffin incident

Sir William Coffin (1495-1538) was a Devonshire courtier under King Henry VIII having joined the royal household in 1515 as a gentleman of the Privy Chamber.

Sir William Coffyn

That which Coffin became known for was an incident that occurred while he was traveling northwards to Derbyshire, and came by Bideford church and cemetery. In the cemetery there was a group of people standing around, not part of a ceremony of any kind so William Coffin stopped to find out what was happening. The situation was that a corpse had been brought to the church to be buried, along with the people who had come to gather for the ceremony, however the priest was refusing to perform the funeral. In payment for the priest to perform the burial rites they required payment from the deceased’s estate, and in this case it was the cow that belonged to the deceased man as he was poor, but the dead man’s friends would not give the cow up. After being told this William found the priest and ordered him to perform the funeral service as it was his job, but the priest still refused to do it without payment. At this, William ordered the people who were gathered there to grab the priest and put him into the hole that had been dug for the corpse and that dirt be thrown in on top of him. The priest continued in his refusal until the man was nearly fully buried in the earth when at last he conceded.

Such treatment of priests was not acceptable, even during the period of the Dissolution, and William would have expected to receive punishment for this incident, and even perhaps have been executed for such a crime against a man of God. King Henry VIII was informed of the incident and as a result William was summoned before Parliament. For anyone else this would not have ended well, anyone else would have ended up in the Tower or executed. However, Sir William had a number of friends in the House as well as at court and they were loyal to him and he avoided punishment. In fact, he turned it around and brought to Parliament’s attention the negative consequences of priests demanding payment (mortuaries) for church services. He drew the attention of the matter away from his personal actions onto the wider situation of the bad behaviour of clergymen. As a result of this, an Act was passed soon after which stopped practices including mortuaries.

Margaret Coffin Tomb 1539

Tomb of Margaret Coffin – 1539 +

His presence at court is first recorded when William attended the King in Guisnes in 1519 and took part in the tournament, and later at the Field of the Cloth of Gold in 1520.

In 1529 he became a Member of Parliament for Derbyshire, despite him being born in Devonshire, due to his wife Margaret Dymoke, daughter of the Hereditary Royal Champion Sir Robert Dymoke, having connections to that county; her first husband was Derbyshire man Sir Richard Vernon of Haddon Hall.
In 1533 William Coffin was the Master of the Horse at the coronation of Anne Boleyn and throughout her reign as queen, as well as that of Jane Seymour. He also became the steward of Queen Jane’s manors of Standon and Hitchin in Hertfordshire. In this office, on the 17th October 1357 William received the official surrender to the Crown of the Hitchin Priory from the Prior, as part of the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
On the 18th October 1357 William Coffin was knighted, however he did not get to enjoy this position for long as on the 8th December 1538 Sir William had died of the plague.
William and his wife had no surviving children, therefore his heirs were his wife Margaret and his nephews William Coffin the elder, William Coffin the younger and Richard Coffin. Margaret remarried again shortly after to Richard Manners in 1539.

Sir William Coffyn
St Mary’s Church, Standon

Sir William is buried in the church in Standon, commemorated by this inscription;

"Here lies William Coffin, Knight, sometime of the privy chamber with his sovereign Lord King Henry the eighth, Master of the Horse unto queen Jane the most lawful wife unto the aforesaid King Henry the eighth, and high steward of all the liberty [and] manor of Standon in the county of Hertford, which William deceased the eighth day of december Anno domini 1538, [in] the thirtieth year of the reign of King Henry the eighth"

http://cupboardworld.blogspot.com/2013_10_01_archive.html

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Sir Richard Coffin 1456 RichardCoffinArms_HeantonPunchardonChurch

Sir Richard Coffin 1456 – 1523

Details from Easter Sepulchre monument to Richard Coffin: left: arms of Coffin; right: entwined initials “RC”, two sets in spandrels of canopy

Sir Richard Coffin 1456 RichardCoffinEasterSepulchreHeantonPunchardon1

Easter Sepulchre monument to Richard Coffin (1456-1523) of Heanton Punchardon and Portledge, Alwington. North wall of chancel, Heanton Punchardon Church

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

RC initials for Sir Richard Coffin

Sir Richard Coffin 1456 – 1523

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Coffin_(1456-1523)

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Knight James Coffin 1551 800px-JamesCoffinBrassDetailMonkleighDevon

Sir James Coffin 1551 –  Detail of James Coffin monumental brass,[6] Monkleigh Church.

Knight James Coffin 1551 JamesCoffinMonumentMonkleighDevon

16th century mural monument to a kneeling knight, featuring heraldry of the Coffin family. Monkleigh Church, high up on north wall of chancel. Monumental brass depicting a bearded knight, said to represent James Coffin (d.1566)[6] kneeling in prayer, surrounded by heraldic escutcheons depicting the arms of Coffin: Azure, three bezants between eight crosses crosslet or

Knight James Coffin 1551 Coat of Arms CoffinArmsMonkleighChurchDevon

Arms of Coffin family, lords of the manor of Monkleigh: Azure, three bezants between eightcrosses crosslet or, and right as seen on 16th century Coffin mural monument in Monkleigh Church, with a crest of a bird of some variety

Jane Coffin 1646 JaneCoffyn1646_MonkleighChurchDevon

Inscribed slate mural monument to Jane Coffyn (d.1646), Monkleigh Church, west wall of north transept. Inscription: “Resurgimus” (we will rise again) “Jane the eldest childe of John Coffyn Esqr wife of Hugh Prust, gent, 13 Mons” “who w(i)th her chrisome son(n)e was buried nere this place the first of July 1646”.
“A mayde a wife in wife and right accord,
She liv’d she di’d true servant of the Lord.
Aetatis suae 27” (of her age 27). At the top is a heraldicescutcheon showing the arms of Prust impaling the arms of Coffyn.[nb 1]

Knight James Coffin 1551 Monkleigh_-_across_the_fields_-_geograph.org.uk_-_667182

The Manor of Monkleigh was a mediaeval manor centred on the village of Monkleigh in North Devon, England, situated 2 1/2 miles north-west of Great Torrington and 3 1/2 miles south-east of Bideford.

Descent of the manor

The Domesday Book of 1086 records Monkleigh as Lege, the ninth of the 79 holdings in Devon as tenant-in-chief, of Robert, Count of Mortain(c. 1031–1090) the half-brother of William the Conqueror. His tenant at Monkleigh was a certain Alured, modernised to Alfred. Before theNorman Conquest of 1066 it was held by the Saxon Ordulf, thought to represent the Anglo-Saxon name “Ordwulf”.[1]

During the reign of King Stephen (1135-1154) the manor of Monkleigh was granted by its then holder “Alfred the Butler”, together with his other estates of Frizenham (in the parish of Little Torrington.[2]) and Densham (in the parish of Woolfardisworthy[3]), to Montacute Priory.[4][5]

Coffin

 Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, a lease of the manor of Monkleigh was granted by the crown gratis on 26 August 1540 for the term of their lives to James Coffyn of Alwington and Anne his wife[7] It was valued at £21 11s 6d per annum, but unusually no charge was made for the grant. As is recorded in the text of the royal grant Anne was the widow of Sir George St Leger of Annery,[8] the chief estate within the manor of Monkleigh.

James Coffin was the second son of John Coffin of Portledge, in the parish of Alwington. He was still living in 1551 when he was mentioned in the will of his eldest brother Richard Coffin (d.1555) of Portledge. The Coffin family is one of the most ancient of Devon families. Tristram Risdon (d.1640) stated: “Alwington…the manor whereof hath been in the name of Coffin even from The Conquest“.[9]

On 11 June 1544 the crown granted the manor of Monkleigh, subject to the life interest of James Coffin and his wife, to Sir John Fulford of Dunsford and Humphrey Colles of Barton, Somerset, along with other grants of property. For Monkleigh manor they were charged £194 3s 4d, representing 10 years’ purchase of its annual value. They were also granted Monkleigh Woods for £29 13s 6d, representing 20 years’ purchase[10] Fulford and Coles paid the purchase price in full on 2 June 1544 and just one week later obtained royal licence to alienate to James Coffin of Alwington, the life tenant.[11]

A small monumental brass of a kneeling knight exists in Monkleigh Church high up on the north wall of the chancel, affixed to a stone tablet on which are sculpted several heraldic escutcheons of the arms of Coffin (Azure, three bezants between eight crosses crosslet or)[12] impaling arms of their heiresses. Pevsner suggests a date for the brass of 16th. century and that the stone tablet on which it is now affixed was originally part of a now lost 16th. century monument.[13]

The next member of the Coffin family recorded by the heraldic visitations of Devon to have a connection with Monkleigh Church is John Coffin (1593-1622) of Portledge. John was Richard Coffin’s great-grandson.[14] Three of John’s daughters were married in Monkleigh Church, between 1645 and 1657.[15] A mural monument exists in Monkleigh Church, in the north transept, to his eldest daughter Jane Coffin (1593-1646),[16] who in 1645, aged 26, married in Monkleigh Church to Hugh Prust[17] (1614-1650)[18] of Annery,[citation needed] within the parish of Monkleigh. She died the next year, as her mural monument records,[citation needed] and her husband died five years later without progeny,[19] when his heir to Annery became his younger brother Lt-Col.Joseph Prust (1620-1677) of Annery.”[20]

John Coffin’s son and heir was Richard Coffin (d.1700) of Portledge, Sheriff of Devon in 1683, who in 1648 married his third wife Dorothy Rowe in Monkleigh Church.[15] His son and heir by this third wife was John Coffin (1649-1704) of Portledge, who was baptised at Monkleigh. He left no progeny and eventually his heir became his heir became his great-nephew Rev. John Pine-Coffin (1735-1824), the grandson of his eldest sister Dorothy Coffin (b.1651) and her husband Edward Pyne of Eastdowne.[21][nb 2] Later in about 1823 his son and heir Richard Pine-Coffin (1770-1833)[23] sold some land in his manor of Monkleigh to John Rolle, 1st Baron Rolle (d.1842) for part of the course of the Rolle Canal between about the Ridd limekilns to the Beam Aqueduct, following the left-bank of the River Torridge.[24] Colonel Richard Geoffrey Pine-Coffin (1908-1974) DSO & Bar, MC, born at Portledge, was a parachute officer of the British Army during World War II. The Pine-Coffin family until recently still possessed the advowson of Alwington Church, making it one of the most ancient lineages in Devon, albeit more recently via a female line, although the mansion of Portledge was converted into a hotel some time before 1959[25]and the estate of Portledge was sold in 1998, due to a dispute with the Inland Revenue.[26]

Historic estates

Annery

Within the manor and parish of Monkleigh is located the former historic estate ofAnnery. The post-Dissolution lords of the manor of Monkleigh had their main residence elsewhere outside the parish at Portledge, Alwington,[27] and thus Annery was the most important seat within the manor and the successive holders of it had their own chapel within the parish church, at the east end of the south aisle, known as the “Annery Chapel”.[13]

 

http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Manor_of_Monkleigh

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ellis island give me your huddled masses e plurubus unum

EllisIslandSearch

There are 2,079 COFFIN immigrants through Ellis island search:

http://libertyellisfoundation.org/passenger-result

 

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Levi Coffin House – Grand Central Station of the Underground Railroad

March 16, 2009

Uncle Tom’s Cabin – 3,000 Slaves passed through this house know as The Underground Railroad’s Grand Central Station

Levi Coffin House

A part of the legendary Underground Railroad for fleeing slaves of pre-Civil War days, this registered National Historic Landmark is a Federal style brick home built in 1839.


Hidden Room

Escaping slaves could be hidden in this small upstairs room and the beds moved in front of the door to hide its existence.

Levi and Catharine Coffin were legendary in helping many former slaves escape to freedom in the North. Levi is often referred to as the President of the Underground Railroad.

Life for a runaway slave was full of hazards. The journey to freedom meant traveling only a few miles at night, using the North Star as a map and trying to avoid search parties. Often, escaped slaves would hide in homes or on the property of antislavery supporters. These stops to freedom were called Underground Railroad stations because they resembled stops a train would make between destinations. “Underground” refers the the secret nature of the system.

To the thousand of escaped slaves, an eight-room Federal style brick home in Newport (Fountain City), Indiana, became a safe haven on their journey to Canada. Undergound Railroad RoutesThis was the home of


Wagon with hiding place.

Escaping slaves were well hidden for their travels in this wagon when grain bags were piled around the hiding area.
Levi and Catharine Coffin, North Carolina Quakers who opposed slavery. During the 20 years they lived in Newport, the Coffins helped more than 2,000 slaves reach safety.

In their flight, slaves used three main routes to cross into freedom: Madison and Jeffersonville, Indiana and Cincinnati, Ohio. From these points, the fugitives were taken to Newport. African-American Rag Doll – Click for larger view.Once in the house, the presence of the runaway slaves could be concealed for up to several weeks, until they gained enough strength to continue their journey.

So successful was the Coffin sanctuary that, while in Newport, not a single slave failed to reach freedom. One of the many slaves who hid in the Coffin home was “Eliza”, whose story is told in Uncle Tom’s Cabin. In 1847, the Coffins moved to Cincinnati so that Levi could operate a wholesale warehouse which supplied goods to free labor stores.

The Coffin house was purchased in 1967 by the State of Indiana. The house was restored and then opened to the public in 1970. The site is a registered National Historic Landmark and is operated by the Levi Coffin House Association.


Levi Coffin


Catharine Coffin

http://www.waynet.org/levicoffin/

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uncle toms cabin harriet beecher stowe

Uncle Tom’s Cabin – Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Tubman 1820-1913.jpg

Harriet Tubman 1920-1913

 

Parkman Pedigree, Family Groups & 55,599 Ancestors

March 9, 2009

my heritage logo.jpg

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027883&familyTreeID=2

Ancestry Logo.jpg

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/family?cfpid=290024880537

pedigree charts

family tree pedigree

Direct link to Parkman Genealogy with 55,599 Ancestors on my GEDCOM / PAF searchable database:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027883&familyTreeID=2

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/family?cfpid=290024880537

Parkman Progenitors totaling 55,599 ancestors in GEDCOM format with Pedigree Charts and Family Groups click on the ParkmanPAF.paf GEDCOM file uploaded:

https://www.myheritage.com/site-370411831/parkman
Parkman Family Bible:
https://familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titledetails&titleno=271778&disp=Parkman++family++Bible++records%2C++1658%20%20&columns=*,0,0

Tristram Coffin House (1678) Newbury MA

March 9, 2009

 

Tristram Coffin house early photo date unknown

tristram coffin house

SONY DSC

tristram coffin house newbury 3

Tristram Coffin House 14 High Road Newbury MA built 1678

Tristram Coffin, Jr. House, 14 High Street, Newbury (Newburyport), MA

Coffin House – now a MUSEUM

1678-1712: Tristram and Judith: First Generation

The significance of the Coffin House lies partly in the age of the original building but more importantly in the way in which it reveals how a home, built in 1678, grew and changed over the years to accommodate the needs of six generations of one family. The earliest part of the house, the southwest ell, is an example of what is known in New England as First Period or Post-Medieval style.

When Tristram Coffin Jr. came to Newbury with his parents, siblings, aunts, and grandmother in 1643, it was a frontier settlement with Indian tribes nearby, wild animals, few roads, and most travel by water. In 1642 there were only 455 people living in Newbury. The town’s economy was primarily a combination of agriculture and husbandry. There was a limited number of artisans and manufacturers. Some of the earliest were weavers, tanners, and shoemakers.

The Coffin family was originally from Devonshire, England, and was somewhat prominent there. Tristram Coffin Sr. was a royalist during the English Civil War. He chose to leave England when the king was deposed and Oliver Cromwell installed. In 1646, the family, with the exception of the two older sons, Peter and Tristram, emigrated, eventually settling on Nantucket. Peter, the eldest son, left for New Hampshire, leaving fourteen-year-old Tristram Jr. the only remaining Coffin in Newbury. It is possible that Tristram was indentured to a local tradesman, as was common. It is also possible that his master was Henry Somerby, whose twenty-eight-year-old widow Judith married the twenty-one-year-old Tristram in 1654.

It was long believed that Tristram brought his young bride to the Coffin House in 1654. However, conclusive dendrochronology has since proven this house to date from 1678. Because we know that Judith inherited a substantial house and many possessions from her first husband, it is assumed that the Coffins set up housekeeping in another house on the lower green near the Parker River. It was in the other house that Judith and Tristram raised their ten children and her three Somerby children as well.

Thus the question remains – why would forty-six-year-old Tristram and fifty-three-year-old Judith move house to the upper green? We know that she still owned the Somerby house in 1705, the year she died. The clue may lie in the death of three of her sons, all in adolescence or early adulthood, in the years preceding the 1678 building of this house. Enoch and Joseph Coffin died in 1675 and 1677 respectively, and her only surviving male Somerby child, Daniel, was killed by Narragansett Indians during King Phillip’s War in 1676. Because Daniel stood to inherit a substantial portion of his late father’s estate, his death made a great deal of land available to the Coffins. With only four children still at home, devastated by the loss of three of their sons, the Coffins left the house in which they had begun their married life, and moved to a small house on the upper green, to land that was most likely slated to pass to Daniel Somerby. We also know that two of the Coffin daughters began married life on October 31, 1677, further reducing the household.

The upper green in Newbury grew rapidly in the 1660s and 1670s as the sons and daughters of the first settlers built homesteads on what had been their parents’ pasture land. Stephen Swett built the house at 4 High Road in 1670, and the Atkinson house on the upper green was built in 1664. The carpenters who built all of these houses adapted the Post-Medieval building style and methods of England to the growing population of Newbury and the more severe climate of New England.

The original Coffin House, or part of it, survives today as the back section, except for the small addition on the southwest corner, which was added in the nineteenth century. Typical of early New England buildings, the main facade faced south to take maximum advantage of the sun’s warmth in winter. There may have been a porch with a chamber above off the south side of the house originally.

1712-1785: Nathaniel, Joseph, and Joshua: Growth and Change

Tristram Jr. and Judith lived in the house until they died in 1704 and 1705 respectively. The house and land were inherited by their youngest son, Nathaniel, who had remained at home with his aging parents. In 1693 he had brought his bride, Sarah, to live in the house. Nathaniel and Sarah had eight children (all but one lived to adulthood), five of whom were born before the deaths of Tristram and Judith. In 1712, the Coffins added the front range to the house. This large and imposing addition faced the High Road and also demonstrates important changes in Newbury in the eighteenth century. The road out front was so developed by this time that houses were reoriented to face it, clearly not the case when the older part of the house was built in 1678. It included refinements such as plaster between the ceiling joists in the southeast chamber and a chamfered roof frame. The house may well have also had a plaster cove cornice along the High Road facade. This elegant feature, introduced in the 1690s, was found in several other substantial Newbury houses built in the period, including the Benaiah Titcomb house and the Pillsbury house. At the time the addition was created, the chimney bay in the ell was made wider and the chimney rebuilt to include fireplaces facing both ways.

Nathaniel, like his father, appears to have combined a variety of activities in order to support his family. On many documents, such as land deeds, Nathaniel is listed as a merchant-tailor, as was his father. However, family account books indicate that he started the tanning business that would sustain the family into the 1800s. Like his father, he was prominent in Newbury affairs. He was a deacon of his church, he served the colony beyond the town as a representative to the General Court in 1719-1721, was Councillor to the Province in 1730, and Justice of the Peace in 1734.

In 1725, Nathaniel’s son Joseph brought home his bride Margaret to set up housekeeping, and the house saw the start of another generation. When Joseph and Margaret moved in, Joseph’s parents and three of his siblings were still living there. Margaret and Joseph had eight children (six survived to adulthood). Joseph and his son, Joshua, like the generations before them, engaged in a variety of activities to sustain the family. They continued in the tanning business, but also maintained tillage land, orchards, pasture, and livestock.

Both Nathaniel and Joseph were active in the local community. They held the office of Newbury town clerk consecutively from 1711 to 1773. The town’s population continued to grow. The first census, taken in 1765, indicates that the town’s population had reached 2,960. The town was an important agricultural community, but manufacturing enterprises were growing.

In 1755, Joseph’s son Joshua married Sarah Bartlett and brought his bride back to the house where his parents continued to live. Joshua and Sarah had twelve children (eight survived to adulthood). Joshua and Sarah also took in apprentices. Historic New England has a copy of the 1772 indenture between a Daniel Mitchell of Wells, Maine, and the Coffins. The agreement is that the Coffins will teach Daniel “the art, trade, and mastery of a tanner…during the term of 5 years, seven months, and 75 days..and also to learn him to read and write legibly…and at expiration of term give him 2 good suits of apparel for all parts of his body, one for the Lord’s day, the other for working days.”

In 1785, the house which had for so many years seen three generations living as one family was legally divided. Edmund Coffin, one of Joshua’s two sons, reached twenty-one and wanted his share of his deceased father’s estate. Consequently, a division was made first between the two sons and their widowed mother, and after her death in 1798, between the two sons. Each had exclusive use of certain rooms, stairways, and cellars with right of passage through some of the other rooms. The “families” lived separately under one roof, using different kitchens and entertaining rooms. The house remained divided this way through the last generation of Coffins to occupy the house.

1785-1893: Lucy and Joshua: Divided Spaces

Edmund and Joseph Coffin legally divided the Coffin house in 1785, and it was their children, Joshua (1792-1864) and Lucy (1811-1893), who lived in their separate spaces through most of the nineteenth century. Joshua graduated from Dartmouth College in 1817 and taught school for many years, numbering among his pupils the poet John Greenleaf Whittier, who addressed to him a poem entitled “To My Old School-Master.” Coffin was ardent in the cause of emancipation, and was one of the founders of the New England Anti-Slavery Society in 1832, serving as its first recording secretary.

He published A Sketch of the History of Newbury, Newburyport, and West Newbury from 1635 to 1845, genealogies of the Woodman, Little, and Toppan families, and magazine articles. As an adult, Coffin lived for a time in the downstairs southwest room of the house. Meanwhile, Joshua’s first cousin Lucy lived her whole life in the front range of the house, becoming the sole resident after the marriage of her mother in 1858.

1929-Present: Becoming a Museum

After Lucy Coffin’s death in 1893, the house passed to her sister Elizabeth’s children. The family was well aware of the importance of a house that had remained so unchanged and in the same family for so many years, but was not interested in living in the house. A series of tenants and family members lived in the house for brief periods, but in 1929, Lucy’s niece, Margaret (Coleman) Merriam, who had inherited both sides of the house, made the decision to give the house to Historic New England.

http://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/coffin-house/coffin-house-photo-gallery#

http://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/coffin-house/coffin-house-history

http://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/coffin-house/collections-on-display

http://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/coffin-house

Tristram Coffin Jr house 14 High Road Newbury Mass built 1678 now museum

Tristram Coffin House 14 High Road Newbury MA built 1678.png

 

 

tristram coffin house newbury mass

The Coffin House is a historic Colonial American house, currently estimated to have been constructed circa 1678. It is located at 14 High Road, Newbury, Massachusetts and operated as a non-profit museum by Historic New England. The house is open on the first and third Saturday of the month from June through October.

The house began in 1678 as a simple structure of two or possibly three rooms on land owned by Tristram Coffin, Jr. About 1713 the house was more than doubled in size, with new partitions added. In 1785, two Coffin brothers legally divided the structure into two separate dwellings, each with its own kitchen and living spaces. The property remained within the Coffin family until acquired by Historic New England in 1929.

Although the house was traditionally dated to 1654 (by Joshua Coffin, author of the 1845 history of Newbury), recent scientific studies have provided more accurate estimates. In 2002, the Oxford Dendrochronology Laboratory[1] analyzed wooden beams from the structure and ascertained that donor trees were felled in winter 1676–1677 and 1677–1678 for the original structure, and winter 1712–1713 for the addition. This revised dating means that the Coffin House may no longer be the earliest example of the principal rafter/common purlin roof, although even so it is certainly one of the oldest extant examples. Coffin House is owned by Historic New England.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffin_House

Captain William Trask in 1624 “Old Planter” of Salem, MA

March 8, 2009

Salem MA founder Roger Conant.jpg

Roger Conant, founder of Salem, MA

salem-witch-statue.jpg

elizabeth montgomery bewitched statue salem witch hunt.jpg

Salem Witch Hunt Statue of Elizabeth Montgomery from tv show “Bewitched”

Salem was founded in 1626 by Roger Conant and a group of immigrants from Cape Ann. At first the settlement was named Naumkeag, but the settlers preferred to call it Salem, derived from the Hebrew word for peace. In 1628, they were joined by another group, led by John Endecott, from the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

Salem, located at the mouth of the Naumkeag river at the site of an ancient Native American village and trading center, was first settled by Europeans in 1626, when a company of fishermen from Cape Ann led by Roger Conant arrived. Conant’s leadership had provided the stability to survive the first two years, but he was immediately replaced by John Endecott, one of the new arrivals, by order of the Massachusetts Bay Company. These “New Planters” and the “Old Planters” agreed to cooperate, in large part due to the diplomacy of Conant and Endicott. In recognition of this peaceful transition to the new government, the name of the settlement was changed to Salem, a hellenized form of the word for “peace” in Arabic سلام (salaam) and Hebrew שלום (shalom). Samuel Skelton was the first pastor of the First Church of Salem, which is the original Puritan church in North America.

Salem included much of the North Shore, including Marblehead. Most of the accused in the Salem witch trials lived in nearby “Salem Village”, now known as Danvers, although a few lived on the outskirts of Salem. Salem Village also included Peabody and parts of present-day Beverly. Middleton, Topsfield, Wenham and Manchester-by-the-Sea were once parts of Salem.

William Hathorne was a prosperous businessman in early Salem and became one of its leading citizens of the early colonial period. He led troops to victory in King Philip’s War, served as a magistrate on the highest court, and was chosen as the first speaker of the House of Deputies. He was a zealous advocate of the personal rights of freemen against royal emissaries and agents.

1630 (Signified A Desire To Take The Oath)

https://www.geni.com/projects/Early-Families-of-Salem-Massachuetts/7146

Among those who arrived with Endecott on the Abigail in Salem, 1628:

Brackenbury, Brown, Davenport, Elford, Endecott, Gott, Laskin, Leach, Maurie/Morey, Puckett, Scruggs, Trask.

http://winthropsociety.com/settlers.php

Immigrant logo

18. Captain William Trask immigrated from England & was Militia Captain of the Pequod War.

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027883&familyTreeID=2

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/family?cfpid=290024880697

Captain William Trask.jpg

Birth: 1585
East Coker
South Somerset District
Somerset, England
Death: May 16, 1666
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA

He was a fisherman who came with the Dorchester Company to Cape Ann in 1624. He came on the Zouch Phenix from Weymouth, England. When the Dorchester Company folded they offered the fisherman the opportunity to return to England. He, along with others moved down the Massachusetts coastline to a place the Indians called “Maumkeg.” It later became a charter for the settlement. It became known as “The Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England.” In 1629, he was a member of the First Church in Salem. On October 19, 1630, he petitioned the court to be a freeman. On November 7, 1632, he appointed, along with seven others, to set boundaries between Roxbury and Dorchester. In 1634 he was made a Captain in the Militia.Family links:
Children:
Henry Trask (1630 – 1683)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Burying Point Cemetery
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA
GPS (lat/lon): 42.52049, -70.89235
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: Anonymous
Record added: Jul 08, 2016
Find A Grave Memorial# 166645167

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=166645167

128.William Trask427,428,429,430, born 1589 in East Coker, Somerset, England431,432; died May 16, 1666 in Salem, Massachusetts433.He was the son of 256. Nicholas Traske.He married 129. Sarah ? 1636 in Salem, Massachusetts434.
129.Sarah ?434,435, born Abt. 1608436; died Abt. 1667 in Salem, MA436.

Notes for William Trask:
The descendants of Captain William Trask, of Salem, Mass. form another branch of the Harris Family Tree.Bessie Trask (1844-1919), who married Arthur Welsford Harris (1871-1941), is a direct descendant of Capt. Trask.
Captain William Trask came to North America in 1624 as a passenger on the Zouch Phenix out of Weymouth, England.This ship was commissioned by the Dorchester Company to establish a community at Cape Ann, Mass.A group of fourteen had remained one year earlier, and the Zouch Phenix left another thirty-two, including William Trask.Cape Ann was not a good site, and the following year a new settlement was established down the coast at Salem.William Trask was one of the founders of Salem, and closely identified with the growth and development of its early settlement.He was active in the civil, military and church life of his community.
Apparently, his wife Sarah was living at the time of his death in 1666, although this doesn’t seen to be consistent with reference to a second wife.
They had six children, and it is through their fourth, William Trask, that we trace our family.He seems to have married a second time, and had two other children.
The Historical Context
In the early years of the seventeenth century England was state of turmoil.Circumstances in the reign of James I (1603-1625) were such that the King and the people were in constant opposition.This antagonism rose from religious, financial and military friction.Parliament no sooner convened than it was dissolved by the King when he didn’t get his own way.Men chafed under such rule and this in part resulted in the emigration of thousands of Puritans and the eventual flight of the Pilgrim Fathers to Holland and America.Despite high hopes when Charles I (1625-1639) succeeded his father, and the prevailing optimistic view that things would improve, Charles proved to be devious indeed and things went from bad to worse for the merchants, the military and the professional men of the towns.
There were problems in New England as well.The trek of English fishermen all the way across the Atlantic Ocean and back every season became more unsatisfactory as their facilities on the New England coast became more sophisticated.It was proving to be expensive to abandon small boats, drying flakes, salting and smoking apparatus, not to mention the enormous amount of time spent on the Atlantic coming and going.Therefore a permanent year-round colony with a settled population, which in addition would give proper attention to religious and civil matters, was regarded as a desirable solution by both businessmen and the liberal element of the Puritan Party in England.
The Dorchester Company
Great emphasis was placed on religion and this was really the incentive which compelled the energetic and far-sighted Rev. John White of Dorchester, England to devote his efforts to the organizing of this new colony.His concept differed from that of the Plymouth Colony as he considered separation from the Church of England to be evil and his colony was to be a place of refuge for men of moderate views.The Dorchester Company was the result of his successful promotion of this idea among the clergy and merchants.It was founded under a grant (or patent) from the Council for New England.Cape Ann was selected for the location of the new settlement.
The Dorchester Company was a joint stock company with a capital of some three thousand pounds.It had 121 members: 50 gentry from Dorset, 6 from Devon, 30 merchants mostly from Dorchester, 20 clergy, several widows and small businessmen, all with Puritan tendencies.It was responsible for sending out the people who would grow corn, hunt for venison, fish and foul and provide a settlement for the fishing industry.Roger Conant was the first governor.No doubt the company was the talk of the whole west country due the publicity circulated on the subject by its booster John White.
Since William Trask’s home was in Somerset near the border of Dorset, he would have heard of the Dorchester Company very easily.He was in his early thirties and no doubt already established by the time he heard of the Company’s plan to take Englishmen to Massachusetts.Evidence exists that he that he may have gone to Delft in Holland in 1623, perhaps to size up the Pilgrims.He made sure that he became part of that early phase of the Dorchester Company.Had he remained in England he would have had a rough time of it in view of what we know of his subsequent activities in Salem.He emerges as an outspoken citizen, soldier, politician and petitioner for all sorts of things.Today he would probably be writing letters to the editor.
Although the fishing connection was not very successful, the nucleus of a colony was nevertheless planted in New England.Ships had left 14 men at Cape Ann in 1623, 32 men in 1624, including William Trask.He came in the spring along with 14 others on the Zouch Phenix from Weymouth, England.
After a year, however, the original company back in England (often called the Adventurers) became discouraged to the point of dissolving the Dorchester Company, thus ending their connection to the Cape Ann Colony.All wages were to be paid and anyone who desired would be brought home to England.At this point Roger Conant and several others including William Trask moved to a more congenial site located slightly down the Massachusetts coast.Fortunately this proved to more suitable for farming and for a permanent settlement.It was called Maumkeg by the Indians.We know it as Salem.
Back in England John White was determined to continue his support and wrote promising a new patent to the group if they would stay on. For awhile the new name was the Joint Adventurers for Settling of Plantation in New England. Those who remained in Massachusetts were henceforth designated ‘the Old Planters’ and eventually were granted choice farm lands.
By the summer of 1627 the new community was thriving but the promised patent had not arrived.So John Woodberry (or Woodbury) and William Trask returned to England to obtain it.This explains why William travelled to New England twice.John Woodberry brought his family on his return, but there is no evidence as to when Sarah Trask, William’s wife, came to Salem.
John Endicott was chosen as the new agent to succeed Conant who nevertheless remained in Salem.The Company’s new name evolved into “New England Company for a Plantation in Massachusetts Bay” but this did not seem to catch on so they tried “The Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England”.This list of titles may thus be recognized as really the same company in different guises and need not cause confusion.
The writings of Gwen Trask provide a chronology of events of William Trask, which are incorporated into the above notes, or as follows.
In 1629 William was member of the First Church of Salem, and on 19 October 1630 petitioned the General Court of Massachusetts to be made a freeman.He took the oath the following May.That he was literate becomes apparent as many papers written and signed by him are accessible.He seems to have been a responsible citizen and as early as 7 November 1632 he was appointed (with several others) by the general court to set boundaries between Dorchester and Roxbury.1634 found William Trask on the committee to superintend the construction of fortifications and he was made captain of the Militia this year, in charge of the military defence of Salem.He was always regarded as a military man and was called Captain.
In 1635 Roger Conant, William Trask and three others were appointed overseers of land to set the boundaries of Newbury.This was also the year, the first of four, that he was elected Deputy from Salem to the General Court of Massachusetts.Also in 1635, five farms of 200 acres each at Bass River were granted to the ‘old planters’, one of whom was William Trask.He was sent to ‘apprehend rogues’ and overtook them at Piscataqua.He figured conspicuously in the Piquod War and served in the then wilds of Connecticut with the Eastern Regiment under the command of John Endicott, Col. andJohn Winthrop, Lieut. Col.; asWilliam Trask, Muster Master.
In 1637 William Trask laid out a farm for Mr. Humphrey, Deputy Governor.
He held the position of Captain of Militia in charge of the defence of Salem for ten years when the following directive was set down: “The chief military officer of the band should inhabit in or near the harbour and considering Captain Trask who hath been many years their chief officer dwells so remote from that part of the town as he cannot be helpful upon any such suden occasion, doth hereby discharge him of that office with due acknowledgement of his faithfil and former good service to the country.”This ties in with information regarding his homestead being being in what is now Danvers and a good way inland from the harbour side of Salem.
Captain Trask had several grants of land from the town in addition to the one of 200 acres.In 1636 he erected a mill for grinding corn on the North River at a place later called Frye’s Mills.In 1640 he had permission from the town to set up a tide mill and a fulling mill near his grist mill.On 6 June 1639 William Trask was specially mentioned and received 200 acres “in regard of much service”.Then in 1658 he was granted 400 acres in Pequod County (Pequot or Pequod is now New London, Connecticut).
On 8 June 1657 seats in the Meeting House were assigned to prominent persons for the first time : “Sergeant Porter should sit in the same seat with Captain Trask.”On 22 March 1658: “The foreseat in the gallery apart for William Trask (among several others).”
In 1661 in his 74th year he sent a petition on behalf of his associates in the Pequod War for recompense.This and many other legal papers related to William’s extremely full life are preserved in the Massachusetts Archives in the State House, Boston.His handwriting and style of expression could easily defeat even his most eager descendant at first reading but once one gets the key, the archaic spelling and structure become relatively readable.
At age 77, William died on 16 May 1666 and was buried with military honours.The Trask Burying Grounds was so called because it was next to the Trask Homestead and Captain Trask was probably buried in it (attempts to locate it in recent years have been unsuccessful).
He was survived by his wife, Sarah, whether the first Sarah, mother of the first five or six children or a second Sarah who may have been the mother of the last two or three is not certain.It is sure, however, that the first Sarah was the mother of William, thus the ancestor of the Nova Scotia Trasks.
More About William Trask:
Baptised: Dec 14, 1585, East Coker, Somerset, England436
Burial: The Trask Burying Grounds
More About William Trask and Sarah ?:
Marriage: 1636, Salem, Massachusetts437

Children of William Trask and Sarah ? are:

i. Sarah Trask438, born Jan 01, 1634/35 in Salem, MA438; died Dec 26, 1696 in Boston, MA.438; married Elias Parkman Oct 13, 1656 in Salem, Mass.438; born Nov 05, 1635 in Dorchester, England; died Aug 18, 1691 in Wapping, London, England439.
More About Elias Parkman and Sarah Trask:
Marriage: Oct 13, 1656, Salem, Mass.440
ii. Mary Trask440,441, born Nov 01, 1636 in Salem, MA; married (1) John Loomis Oct 13, 1656 in Salem, Mass.441; died Abt. 1685 in Salem, MA441; married (2) Daniel Batter Bef. 1685.
More About Mary Trask:
Baptised: Jan 01, 1636/37

 

More About Daniel Batter and Mary Trask:
Marriage: Bef. 1685
iii. Susanna Trask442, born Jun 10, 1638 in Salem, MA; married Samuel Aborne Feb 19, 1663/64.
More About Susanna Trask:
Baptised: Oct 1638

 

More About Samuel Aborne and Susanna Trask:
Marriage: Feb 19, 1663/64
64 iv. William Trask, born Jul 19, 1640 in Salem, Essex, Mass.; died Jun 30, 1691 in Salem, Essex, Mass; married (1) Ann Lynn Putnam Jan 18, 1666/67 in Salem, Massachusetts; married (2) Anna ? Aft. Nov 1676.
v. John Trask442,443, born Jul 13, 1642 in Salem, MA; died Nov 29, 1729 in Salem, MA443; married Abigail Parkman Feb 19, 1661/62 in Salem, Mass.443; born Abt. 1646 in Windsor, CT; died Abt. Aug 08, 1677 in Salem, MA.
More About John Trask:
Baptised: Sep 18, 1642, Salem, Mass.

 

More About John Trask and Abigail Parkman:
Marriage: Feb 19, 1661/62, Salem, Mass.443
vi. Elizabeth Trask444, born Jul 21, 1645.
More About Elizabeth Trask:
Baptised: Sep 24, 1645

 

 

http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/h/a/r/Andrew-G-Harris/BOOK-0001/0008-0013.html

 

trask family desk sothebys auction N08710-225-lr-1.jpg

This one-drawer chest descended in the Trask family of Salem and was probably originally commissioned by John Trask (1678-1737) around the time of his marriage to Hannah Osborne (1679-1721). It descended through three generations of their family to William Blake Trask (1812-1906), who donated the piece to the New England Historical and Genealogical Society in 1902. An article by William published a year earlier shows the chest in the Boston Street house in Salem of his great-great-great grandfather, William (1640-1691), one of the founders of Salem. Another one-drawer chest attributed to the Symonds shop may have originally been owned by Hannah Osborne Trask or her brother John Osborne (1671-1744) (see Willoughby, fig. 9, p. 177). A genealogical chart showing possible lines of descent for these two chests is illustrated in Willoughby, fig. 6, p. 175.

http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2011/important-americana-including-american-stoneware-assembled-by-mr-and-mrs-edwin-hochberg-n08710/lot.225.html

A Flag, a Cross and a Sword

by Robert F. Huber

The Shallop Elizabeth Tilley flying the flag of St. George

The Shallop Elizabeth Tilley flying the flag of St. George

When the Howland Society’s shallop sailed from Plymouth to Maine in August 2003 the tiny ship was flying the flag of St. George — the flag created a furor in the early days of New England.

It wasn’t a pretty flag — a red cross emblazoned on a field of white — but it did belong to the king of England and was used by the Royal Navy. The trouble was that it had been given to the king by the Pope as a talisman of victory.

The trouble erupted on a cold October day in 1634. Captain William Trask was drilling his train-band in the fundamentals of military operations. Onlookers in Salem saw the men carrying the flag proudly.

John Endecott who had been the first governor of the settlement at Salem saw it and was horrified.

He believed that the red cross… “was a superstitious thing and a relic of antichrist.”

Roger Williams, the outspoken Plymouth preacher, supported Endecott’s contention that the flag “savored of popery” and was “a badge of superstition.”

John Winthrop, governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, agreed that the cross in the banner “was the image of an idol, and the greatest idol in the church of Rome.”

Many others in Salem, Plymouth, Boston and other colonies echoed these sentiments, but it took bold action by a bold man to face the issue squarely.

John Endecott cut the offending cross from the flag with his sword.

The emperor Constantine started using the flag with the cross as a military emblem and was intended to ward off hostile forces. Church leaders felt the “superstitious belief” that the emblem had power to protect troops made its use “unacceptable.”

Some more moderate leaders such as Thomas Dudley and Thomas Hooker expressed the belief that the reformation “had succeeded in weaning people from the idolatrous use of such symbols and that the cross on the flag could be accepted as a national emblem.”

The men in power were worried, fearing the London authorities would consider Endecott’s action a slap in the king’s face. An investigation was begun and the results were turned over to the General Court. Endecott was “admonished” and banned from holding public office for a year. He was then jailed. But Endecott was no dumb bunny. He was released the same day after admitting his errors.

As for Roger Williams, the General Court ordered him to “depart out” of our jurisdiction with in six weeks.

This little tempest in a teapot had a happy ending.

Endecott was elected governor of Massachusetts Bay several times and died in office. And Roger Williams fled to Rhode Island and founded Providence. He too became a governor.

And more than 400 years afterward, when the Elizabeth Tilley sailed with her crew of Howland descendants the flag of St. George was flying proudly.

http://www.pilgrimjohnhowlandsociety.org/john-howland/articles/45-a-flag-a-cross-and-a-sword

Essex

The Essex colony started at Cape Ann in 1623 with a party led by Thomas Gardner and John Tylly. For this party, there were two ships with 32 people who were to settle the area commercially. About a year later, this party was joined by a group from Plymouth led by Roger Conant. These efforts, funded by the Dorchester Company, which withdrew its funding after 1625. In 1626, some of the original party, as many left to return to England or to go south, moved the settlement, in hopes of finding more success, to Naumkeag. This settlement worked out and became Salem.[3]

According to the Essex Institute, the list of old planters, in 1626, who were in Cape Ann before the move were as follows:

Roger Conant – Governor, John Lyford – Minister (went to Virginia, instead of Naumkeag), John Woodbury, Humphrey Woodbury, John Balch, Peter Palfray, Walter Knight, William Allen,[4] Thomas Gray, John Tylly, Thomas Gardner, Richard Norman (and his son), William Jeffrey, and Capt. William Trask.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Planters_(Massachusetts)

William W. Trask, Sr.

Also Known As: “William Traske”
Birthdate: December 14, 1585
Birthplace: East Coker, , Somerset, , ENGLAND,
Death: Died May 16, 1666 in Salem, , Essex, Massachusetts, USA,
Place of Burial: Peabody, Trask Burial Ground, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family: Son of Nicholas Trask, Sr. and Christyan Nicholas Trask
Husband of Sarah Traske
Father of Henry Trask; Sarah Parkman; John William Trask;William Trask, Jr.; Susannah Trask; Mary Trask; Ann Trask; Eliza Traske; Elizabeth Trask and Eliza Trask « less
Brother of Agnes Traske; Johanne Traske and Joan Traske
Occupation: Soldier, miller/soldier/ capt. ma bay coloney

https://www.geni.com/people/Captain-William-Trask/6000000007329877061

The Alliance Between Pilgrim and Puritan in Massachusetts: An Address…

https://books.google.com/books?id=H53sGNJH94YC&pg=PA23&lpg=PA23&dq=william+trask+a+pilgrim&source=bl&ots=31fi8JFTlY&sig=x7vSsYqJ9_wAZFoChBxzfvv7LHg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiX_M6mq93OAhVL5WMKHeHECmkQ6AEIJzAC#v=onepage&q=william%20trask%20a%20pilgrim&f=false

The Pilgrims of Boston and Their Descendants: With an Introduction by Hon…

https://books.google.com/books?id=RwspAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA205&lpg=PA205&dq=william+trask+a+pilgrim&source=bl&ots=Nyy0SxMzMK&sig=o_k6lNVAld9IVCTdJadqc03NkdY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiX_M6mq93OAhVL5WMKHeHECmkQ6AEIKjAD#v=onepage&q=william%20trask%20a%20pilgrim&f=false

The Pilgrim Republic: An Historical Review of the Colony of New Plymouth

https://books.google.com/books?id=EYMTyhSXv7YC&pg=PA274&lpg=PA274&dq=william+trask+a+pilgrim&source=bl&ots=Ue_XBk29od&sig=UWk-htZ-XWERExnlxBFJNKKAIBw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiX_M6mq93OAhVL5WMKHeHECmkQ6AEINTAG#v=onepage&q=william%20trask%20a%20pilgrim&f=false
https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2028047&familyTreeID=2

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/103040045/family?cfpid=290024880697

 

 

 

 

Coffin Family Tree England 1066 to Nantucket 1659 +

March 8, 2009

Medieval line before Tristram’s move to USA

The Coffin Family may be traced back to William called the Conqueror, who was King of England. In his army he had a General by the name of Coffin. After the conquest he gave an estate to General Coffin, which was entailed and at this; time it is held by a descendant by the name of Coffin, in the town of Rrixam (Brixham) in the county of Devonshire, England.” (From a latter record)

1066, Sir Richard Coffin: Our First Recorded Ancestor. Like all the Nobility of Normandy he would have been of Scandinavian decent. The Vikings were settling in Normandy around the 800’s AD through conquest, they were given the “Duchy of Normandy” by the French King “Charles the Simple” as a defense against other Viking Armies. The First “Duke of Normandy” was Hrolf or Rollo 911AD (an ancestor of “William the Conqueror”).
Sir Richard fought as a General for “William the Conqueror” (formally “William the Bastard”) at the Battle of Hastings, during the Norman invasion of England and Williams successful claim for the English Crown.

“Sir Richards Estate in Normandy was called Courtition, near Falaise which is 20 Miles south of Caen a Large City near the coast. About Half way between La Havre and Cherbourg (this estate stayed in French Coffin hands until 1796, “the present owner, Mons. Le Clerc, being the grandson of the last of that line of Coffins, she having in 1796 married a Le Clerc. The Normandy home and the ancient Portledge manor house ( which in part has existed for centuries ) must ever be object of great interest to the American Branch”.

His land “Gifted” in England for his valuable service to the new King was the Estate of the Manor of Alwington a few miles from Bideford, Devonshire southwestern England.
Coffins are also in the Williams “Doomsday book” (1080) as current inhabitants of England, probably settlers from France at an earlier date. The Coffins spread out to Somerset, Dorset, Wiltshire and Cornwall. By 1252 the name in its different forms (Colvin, Corvin, Cophen and Coffyn) are frequently found in records. The name is disputed in its origins. Welsh “Coffyn” meaning hill top boundary, English and French: metonymic occupational name for a basket maker, from Old French cof(f)in ‘basket’ (Late Latin cophinus, Greek kophinos). The modern English word coffin is a specialized development of this term, not attested until the 16th century.
and the most likely to me is the meaning of “Coffer” or treasure box.

Some of the Recorded Coffins.
1154-1189 Sir Richard Coffin under the Reign of King Henry II
1199-1216 Sir Elias Coffin during King Johns Reign
1216-1272 Sir Jeffrey Coffin and Combe Coffin – King Henry III
1307-1327 Sir Richard Coffin – King Edward II
1399-1413 Sir Richard Coffin – King Henry IV
1509-1547     Sir William Coffin – King Henry VIII, “Sheriff of Devonshire”, “Master of the Horse” For the Queens Coronation. One of 18 men who accompanied the King to a Tournament in France. When he died his estate was large and he even left his prize Hawks and Horses to the King. He left land to his two nephews one was Sir Richard of Portledge who received the Manor of East Higgington, Devonshire.

Direct Line
The medieval part is disputed through to Tristram of Nantucket’s own Family.

Generation One
circa 1280, Richard Coffyn was born  at Alwington, Devonshire, England.

Generation Two
circa 1301, John Coffyn was born  at Alwington, Devonshire, England.

Generation Three
circa 1332, David Coffyn was born  at Alwington, Devonshire, England. He married Thomasin (  ?  ) circa 1361. He died after 1370.

Generation Four
circa 1361, David Coffyn was born  at Alwington, Devonshire, England.

Generation Five
circa 1392, John Coffyn was born  at Alwington, Devonshire, England. He married Thomasin Hartley in 1406 at Alwington, Devonshire, England. He died in 1427.

Generation Six
circa 1420, William Coffyn was born  at Alwington, Devonshire, England. He married Margaret Cockworthy Giffard circa 1453 at Alwington, Devonshire, England. He died on 11 Sep 1486.

Generation Seven
circa 1425, Richard Coffyn was born  at Portledge, Devonshire, England. He married Alice Gambon, daughter of John Gambon, in 1462 at Merston, Shropshire, England.
Children of Richard7 Coffyn and Alice Gambon were:

Generation Eight
1450, John Coffyn was born   at Portledge, Devonshire, England. He married Phillippa Elizabeth Hingston, daughter of Philip Hingston, in 1496. He died on 15 Dec 1566 at Devonshire, England.

Generation Nine
circa 1475 Richard Coffyn was born  at Portledge Manor, Brixton, Devon, England. He married Wilmont Chudleigh, daughter of Sir Richard Chudleigh (1468-1535)son of Sir Knight William Chudleigh (1445-1515) and Joan Hody (1446) and her mother Maria Wadham (1470-1535) daughter of Sir Nicholas Wadham (1444) and Jan Hill (1452), in 1510 at Merifield, Cornwall, England. He died on 24 Dec 1555 at Alwington, Devon, England.

Generation Ten
1514, James Coffyn was born at Portledge Manor, Brixton, Devon, England. He married Mary Cole (1513) in 1534. He died on 15 Dec 1566.

Generation Eleven
1535, Peter Coffin was born  at Portledge Manor, Brixton, Devon, England. He married Mary Boscawen, daughter of Hugh Boscawen and Phillippa Carminowe, in 1560. He died on 8 Oct 1613 at Portledge Manor, Brixton, Devon, England.
Children of Peter11 Coffin and Mary Boscawen were as follows:
1560 Nicholas, born  at Chateau Courtiton, Fallaise; married Joan Advant. (see bellow)
1563-1602 Tristram Coffin
Lionel
Philip;

Generation Twelve
1560-1613, Nicholas Coffin – Brixton, Devonshire England The name in early times was written Coffyn was born in 1560 at Chateau Courtiton, Fallaise.
He married Joan Advant (1550)daughter of John Advant (1522-1554) son of John Advent Dudley (1490) and Jane Guildford (1504-1555), her mother Anne Seymour (1529-1588) daughter of Sir Edward Seymour (1506-1552) 1st Duke of Summerset and the Earl of Herford and Anne Stanhute (1497-1536)in 1580 at Butlers, Brixton, Devon, England. He died in 1613 at Brixton, Devonshire, England.

Children of Nicholas Coffin and Joan Advant were as follows:
(1582-1610) John
(1582-1627) Nicholas.
(1584)Tristram
(1584)Peter, born at Brixton, Devon, England; married Joan Kember (Thember)(1578-1661). (see bellow)
(1585-1627) John
(1588) Ann; married Thomas Wynston,
(1590) Joan

Generation Thirteen
Dec 1 1627, Peter Coffin – Brixton England, will proved Mar 13 1628, To Joan, land during her life, and at her decease to go to his son and heir Tristam, ‘who is to be provided for according to his degree and calling’. To son John certain property when 20 years of age. mentions daughters, Joan, Deborah, Eunice, Mary. He refers to tenement in Butlers parish called Silverhay. *May 1661- His widow Joan died in Boston Mass. The Rev. Mr. Wilson who preached the funeral sermon spoke of her as a woman of remarkable character. One Hundred Sixty Allied Families by John 0. Austin ** was born in 1584 at Brixton, Devon, England. He married Joan Kember, daughter of Robert Kember and Anne (  ?  ), in 1604 at Brixton, Devon, England. He died in 1628.

Children of Peter Coffin and Joan Kember were as follows:
(1605-1688) Christian; married Thomas Davis.
(1609-1681)Tristam, born at Plymouth, Devonshire, England; married Dionis Stevens. (see bellow)
(1611-1681) Joan; married Joseph Hull; born at Brixton, Devonshire England.
(1613)Peter.
(1616) Deborah; born at Brixton, Devonshire, England; married William Stevens, son of Robert Stevens and Dionis (  ?  ), 25 Jun 1640 at England.
(1617-1648) Eunice; born at Brixton, Devonshire, England; married William Butler after 1642.
(1619) Mary, born at Brixton, Devonshire, England; married Alexander Adams.
(1625)John; born at England; died 1642 at Plymouth Fort.

Coffin Links

https://coffinnz.blogspot.com/2012/12/medieval-line-before-tristrams-move-to.html?showComment=1470429241080#c3389956262494845954
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Tristram Coffin was 1 of 8 original owners of Nantucket Island in 1659 for 2 beaver hats and 30 pounds sterling (coins). The 8 had purchased Nantucket from The Mayhews. William Parkman, father of Reverend Ebenezer Parkman, married Elizabeth Adams who’s parents were Alexander Adams and Mary Coffin of Nantucket, sister of Tristram Coffin, Sr. co-founder of Nantucket.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8449256

coffin coat of arms

Coffin Coat of Arms

This Coat of Arms is considered the correct Armorial Bearings for the Coffins in America. Adopted by Tristram Coffyn (1609-1681), and featured on the front cover of “The Coffin Saga” by Will Gardner. Although the edition I have is a light silvery blue, and the Coat of Arms is blue.

There are any number of versions of Armorial Bearings for the Coffins, but according to the actual rules, the proper awarded version is technically the only one that can be “used” by the appropriate Coffin line. For example, Sir Isaac Coffin, Baronet was awarded a very specific Coat of Arms for his use as well as any of his dependents.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=10904410&PIpi=115547306

 

Mary Coffin - Mary Gardner Coffin wife of Jetro Coffin (house) grandson of Tristram Sr

Mary Gardner Coffin (1670-1767)

1686   Oldest House and Mary Gardner Coffin
This portrait, attributed to the Pollard Limner, depicts Mary Gardner Coffin (1670-1767). Mary Gardner was born on Nantucket and married Jethro Coffin, grandson of Tristram, in 1686. Their home, built later that year, is still standing on Nantucket. Now known as the Oldest House, it is owned and operated by the Nantucket Historical Association. The Coffin/Gardner marriage symbolized the end of an early conflict in Nantucket society involving their families that was known as the “half-share revolt.” John Gardner and Tristram Coffin were key figures in Nantucket’s early governance. Coffin represented the “full-share” men, or original founders of Nantucket, while Gardner was one of a group of tradesmen who came to work on the island but received only half-shares. Bitter debates between the full-share and half-share parties raged on Nantucket about land rights, who could hold public office, and the future directions for the island. A tentative compromise between the two factions was reached in 1678, but it was not until Coffin’s death in 1681 and the eventual marriage of his grandson into the Gardner family that a full resolution of this conflict occurred.

http://www.nha.org/library/hn/HN-winter2000-timeline.htm

 

Nantucket marker for Tristram Coffin’s Homestead

Tristram Coffin spoon likeness 1642

Tristram Coffin Medallion – 1642

Tristram Coffin (or Coffyn)[fn 1] (ca. 1609 – 2 October 1681) was an immigrant to Massachusetts from England. In 1659 he led a group of investors that bought Nantucket from Thomas Mayhew for thirty pounds and two beaver hats.[2]He became a prominent citizen of the settlement. A great number of his descendants became prominent in North American society, and many were involved in the later history of Nantucket during and after its heyday as a whaling center.[3] Almost all notable Americans with roots in Nantucket are descended from Tristram Coffin, although Benjamin Franklin was an exception.[4]

England, 1605–1642[edit]

Tristram Coffin was born to Peter and Joanna (Kember) Coffin and baptized in the parish of Brixton near Plymouth, England, on 11 March 1609/10.[1] He belonged to the landed gentry.[5] He married Dionis Stevens in 1630 and they were to have nine children, the first five born in England. Coffin was a Brixton church warden from 1639 to 1640, and was a constable in 1641.[6]

Charles I inherited the throne of England in 1625 and initiated a long struggle with his parliament, which wanted to abolish bishops from the House of Lords and limit the king’s powers. Things came to a head when Charles raised his royal standard at Nottingham in August 1642, and England soon descended into Civil War(1642–1651).[5] Tristram Coffin’s only brother John received a mortal wound at Plymouth fort, although it is not known exactly when or even which side he was fighting on.[7] Perhaps for reasons associated with these political upheavals, Tristram Coffin decided to leave his estates in England and emigrate to the new world.[8]

Massachusetts, 1642–1659[edit]

Tristram Coffin sailed to Boston in 1642 with his wife and children, his two sisters and his mother. For a short time he ran an inn in Salisbury, Massachusetts.[1] He then moved to the new settlement of Pentucket, now Haverhill, Massachusetts. His name appears on a deed dated 15 November 1642 recording the sale of the land for the settlement by the local American Indian people. He is said to have used a plow that he had made himself to cultivate the land.[9] It was here that his last four children were born.[6]

In 1648 he left the farm and moved to Newbury, Massachusetts. Here he operated a ferry across the Merrimack River and he and his wife ran a tavern. In 1653 his wife was “presented” for selling beer above the legal price of two pennies per quart. However, she was acquitted when it was found that her beer was much stronger than the ordinary.[10] Coffin sold the inn and ferry in 1654 or 1655 and moved to Salisbury, Massachusetts, where he signed himself “Tristram Coffyn, Commissioner of Salisbury”.[11]

Nantucket, 1659–1681[edit]

Tristram Coffin Jr. House, built in Newburycirca 1678

Jethro Coffin House, built in 1686 for Jethro Coffin, Tristam Coffin’s grandson, and now the oldest house on Nantucket

Tristram Coffin and other Salisbury investors bought Nantucket island from Thomas Mayhew on 2 July 1659.[12] The purchase price was 30 pounds plus two beaver hats made by his son, also called Tristram. Coffin was the prime mover of the enterprise and was given first choice of land. In 1659 he settled near the western end of the island near Capaum pond.[6] His sons Peter Coffin, Tristram Coffin Junior and James Coffin also received land on the island.[13] Soon after settling, Tristram Coffin purchased the thousand-acre Tuckernuck Island at the western end of Nantucket. On 10 May 1660 the sachems conveyed title to a large part of the island to Coffin and his associates for eighty pounds.[14] He built a corn mill in which he employed many of the local Native Americans, and he employed others on his farm.[15]

In 1671 Coffin and Thomas Macy were selected as spokesmen for the settlers, going to New York in 1671 to meet withGovernor Francis Lovelace and secure their claim to Nantucket.[6] As the most wealthy and respected of the settlers, Coffin was appointed chief magistrate of Nantucket on 29 June 1671.[16] In 1677 he was again appointed chief magistrate for a term of four years.[17]

Legacy[edit]

Tristram Coffin died on 2 October 1681 at the age of 76.[1] During the years before his death, he had bestowed much of his property on his children and grandchildren.[18] He was buried on his property on Nantucket Island.[6] At his death he left seven children, 60 grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. One of his grandchildren calculated that by the year 1728, the number of his descendants was 1582, of whom 1128 were still alive.[19]

Several of his descendants achieved prominence. His daughter Mary Coffyn Starbuck became a leader in introducing Quaker practices into Nantucket.[20] A grandson, James Coffin, was the first of the Coffins to enter into the whaling business.[21] A poem by Thomas Worth written in 1763 says six Captains named Coffin were sailing out of Nantucket.[3]Sir Isaac Coffin (1759–1839) served during the American Revolutionary War and the Napoleonic Wars and became an admiral in the British Royal Navy.[22] He founded a school on the island in 1827 to educate descendants of Tristram Coffin – which included almost all the children on the island – with emphasis on nautical skills.[23]

Some branches of the Coffin family were prominent in New England, grouped among the so-called Boston Brahmins.[24]For example, Elizabeth Coffin, daughter of a wealthy merchant from Nantucket, was mother of the prominent Massachusetts industrialists Henry Coffin Nevins andDavid Nevins, Jr..[25] Charles A. Coffin (1844–1926) born in Somerset, Massachusetts, became cofounder and first President of General Electric corporation.[26]Some retained the family links to Nantucket after the whaling industry had collapsed and many people had left the island. In the eighth generation, Elizabeth Coffin(1850–1930), an artist, educator and Quaker philanthropist, was known for her paintings of Nantucket and for helping revive Sir Isaac Coffin’s school with a new emphasis on crafts.[27] Among the ninth generation, Robert P. T. Coffin (1892-1955) was an American Poet who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1936 for his book of collected poems called “Strange Holiness”.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. Jump up^ Tristam always spelled his name “Coffyn” but his descendants used “Coffin” as do most sources on his life[1]
Sources

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tristram_Coffin_(settler)

Tristram Coffin signature

Tristram Coffin signature

nantucket-monument early settlers

Nantucket Early Settlers Monument – Tristram Coffin 1609 – 1681

Nantucket wives mothers children monument 2009 350th anniversary settlement.jpg

 

Tristram Coffin & Dionis Stevens: Nantucket settlers

(Coastal families/Coffin branch)

* Tristram COFFIN was born in 1609 in Brixton Parish, Devon, England; christened on 11 Mar 1609 in Brixton Parish, Devonshire, England; died on 2 Oct 1681 in Nantucket, MA; buried in Maxey Pond Burying Ground, Nantucket, MA.

Tristram COFFIN married Dionis STEVENS in ABT 1630 in Brixton Parish, Devon, England. They had the following children: Peter COFFIN (b. 1631), Tristram COFFIN Jr. (b. 1632), Elizabeth COFFIN, James COFFIN (b. 12 Aug 1640), Mary COFFIN (b. 20 Feb 1645), ♥ John COFFIN Lieut. (b. 13 Oct 1647), Stephen COFFIN (b. 11 May 1652).

BIRTH: Tristram was the 1st of 6 children born to his parents.

EVENT: Tristram inherited real-estate, rents, lodging, food, a personal income and personal property upon the death of his father, Peter Coffin. In his Will, dated 21 Dec 1627 and proved 13 Mar 1627/8 Peter leaves Tristram the following; “…Item I give and bequeth unto Tristram Coffyn my Sonne one feather bedd pformed my best brasen panne and my best brasen crocke. Item I give and bequeth unto Johan Coffyn my wife y issues pfitts and comodities of all my lands tenements & hereditaments wth y sayd Parish of Brixton dureing her widdowhood she yeelding & paying therefor yearly unto the said Tristram my sonne his heirs and assignes the summe of Fifty shillings of lawful English money at y four usual feasts of the year and also sufficient meate drinke & clothes and convenient lodgings unto y sayd Tristram according to his degree and calling dureing her Widowhood…Item I doe give unto Sonne Tristram All my lands rents reversions services & hereditamts with the appurtenances whatsoever sett lying & being wth in the sayd Parish of Brixton or elsewhere wthin y sayd County of Devon…Item All y rest of my goods chattels and cattells nor before given nor bequethed I doe give and bequethe unto Johan Coffyn my wife…”{D5}

IMMIGRATION: Fourteen years after his father’s death: Tristram Coffin came to New World in 1642 with wife, Dionis; their 5 small children; his widowed mother, Joan Thember; and 2 unmarried sisters.{D2}

HOME:
The family first settled in Haverhill, then removed to Newbury in 1648, then to Salisbury, before moving to Nantucket in 1659.
“He soon bought land up the Merrimac River. The Indians had rights, but were willing to sell; their chief, Passaconaway gave his consent and there was a deed passed between which involved 14 miles along the river for 3 Pounds and 10 Shillings. That area became Haverhill, MA. He later went back to Newberry, MA, bought land, put in a ferry with an inn. Then he later got a good buy on a big grant near Dover. It was woodland on the Cochecho River. With his sons he established a lumber mill as he never wanted to hold land alone. Tristram had lost faith in England in the quarrels between king and parliament. His land holdings in England dried up. In a talk with Thomas Mayhew he found Nantucket was available; so he approached Edward Starbuck, Thomas Macy and Isaac Coleman as the core of a company which bought Nantucket for 30 pounds and 2 beaver hats. With the lumber mill, they started a small ship building project. That was very convenient to ship materials to Nantucket…”{D2} Also consult, History of Nantucket by Alexander Starbuck and The Coffin Saga by Will Gardner.
The early settler’s lots on Nantucket were about 1,000 feet on a side, while some were quite irregular in shape. Tristram’s house lot was a tract bounded on the north by Cappam Harbor. He called this region Northam or Cappamet. The spot where his house was placed is marked by a stone monument. {D4}

LIVELIHOOD: Tristram was an entrepreneurial businessman involved with land trading, a lumber mill, ship building, shipping, salvaging wrecked ships and commercial fishing. In general, the early families on Nantucket gained a livelihood through a combination farming and fishing related enterprises.

ORGANIZATIONS: Tristram was Chief Magistrate of Nantucket ca 1671-1673. He held a second term as Chief Magistrate in 1777.{D1}

HISTORICAL EVENTS:
A feud broke out amongst the early settlers of Nantucket. On one side, the Coffin’s and their friends, on the other side, the brothers Richard and John Gardner and their friends. The feud is thought to have developed from the divergent temperaments of Tristram and Capt. John Gardner. Tristram was a natural leader, but had tendencies to be irritable and despotic. Capt. John Gardner was a man of physical courage, rugged honesty and democratic in his dealings, traits that gained him public confidence. {D4}
The estrangement between the Coffin and the Gardner families ended soon after Tristram’s death in 1681. Tristram’s eldest grandson Jethro and Jethro’s brother, Edward, married Mary and Anna Gardner. After 1681, James, another grandson of Tristram, married Love Gardner and later married, Ruth Gardner. Six other children of Richard Gardner married grandchildren of Tristram Coffin, among these, Tristram’s grandson, Samuel Coffin, married Richard Gardner’s daughter, Miriam and became my direct ancestors.{D1)

[Image above: Tristram & Dionis Coffin’s house ( ? Tristram Coffin, Jr. see link below) , originally built by Tristram as a simple structure in about 1654, at 15 High Road in Newbury Massachusetts. The house is well-preserved and is a New England historic site owned by the Historic New England museum. The house is often featured in books about Colonial American architecture. This public domain photograph was taken circa 1907.Added by: Cindy K. Coffin 6/06/2009]

https://parkmangenealogy.wordpress.com/2009/03/09/tristram-coffin-house-newbury-ma/

[Image at left: Hearth in Tristram Coffin house, Newbury, MA.]

Early in 1659 Tristram went to Martha’s Vineyard where he took Peter Folger the Grandfather of Benjamin Franklin as an interpreter of the Indian language and went to Nantucket to ascertain the temper of the Indians and the capabilities of the island so that he could report to the citizens of Salisbury. At Martha’s Vineyard he entered into preliminary negotiations with Thomas Mayhew for the purchase of the island before visiting it. After his  visit to the island he made additional arrangements for its purchase and returned to Salisbury where his report upon the condition of the island, the character of the Indians and the advantages of a change of residence, was laid before his friends and associates. A company was organized for the immediate purchase of the whole island allowing Thomas Mayhew to retain a one-tenth portion with some other reservations. Several meetings of the
purchasers were held at Salisbury and general rules for the government of the island were adopted.

[Photos above: Marker locating the previous site of Tristram Coffin’s home by Capaum Harbor, by 1989 a land locked pond near the ocean, on Nantucket Island.]
Among the eight original owners of Nantucket island, he became the most prominent. He was granted first choice of land and in 1659, he settled on the eastern slope of what is now called Trott’s Hills, near Capaum Pond, toward the western end if the island. He was a leader among the first settlers and was
often asked by other inhabitants to transact important public business. He and Thomas Macy were the spokesmen for the settlement and were selected by the settlers go to New York and meet with Governor Lovelace and secure their claim to the Island in 1671. His letters to the Colonial Government of New York are preserved in the Archives of the Department of State at Albany. He built a corn mill and employed many Native Americans who were the aboriginal inhabitants of the island.

BURIAL: Tristram Coffin, Richard Gardner, Edward Starbuck and presumably their wives and others are buried at the old Maxey Pond Burying Ground. A 6+ foot high “Early Settlers Monument” stands at the site with the inscription: “Erected AD 1881 By A Descendant of the First Settlers of Nantucket in Memory of Those Whose Remains Are Buried on this Hallowed Spot Where stood the First Church Gathered Here 1711 Since Removed to where it Now Stands as the vestry of the First Congregational Society…”. The monument also is inscribed with the names of ten early settlers, including those mentioned above. The settlement and church /burial ground at Maxey Pond/Capum Harbor was, in the early days of the settlement, called “Sherburne”. Sherburne was located about two miles west of the present town of Nantucket.

DOCUMENTS:
1. The Coffin Family by Louis Coffin, 1962, Nantucket Historical Society, Nantucket, MA., p. 81.
2.”The Anderson Story”, by Mrs. C. J. Davis, Mrs. Cora May Boots and others, printed in 1968.
3. Tristram Coffin’s vital statistics are verified by a 6+ foot tall grave yard monument at Maxey Pond Burying Ground, Nantucket,MA.
4. Nantucket Lands and Land Owners Vol. 2., Bulletin No.1., by Henry Barnard Worth, Published by the Nantucket Historical Assn., 1901.
5. Early Settlers of Nantucket by Lydia Swain Mitchell Hinchman. The original may be found in the District Registry attached to the Probate Division of the Court of Justice of Exeter (in the Arcdeaconry Court of Totnes), England.
Individual source: The Anderson Story, by Mrs. C. J. Davis, Mrs. Cora May Boots and others, printed in 1968. A 67 page genealogical record of the Anderson family from John & Elizabeth Horney Anderson, ca 1800 to 1968.

* Dionis STEVENS was born in 1613; died on 6 Nov 1684 in Nantucket, MA.

Dionis Stevens was daughter of Robert, Esquire of Brixton, England.

EVENT: The records indicate that the Coffin, Starbuck and Macy families found their environment in Massachusetts Bay, far from congenial. Each had their own peculiar problem. Macy had been arrested and charged with violating town regulations see below) , and so had Coffin’s wife, Dionis. It is likely that the family was ready to move to a more liberal neighborhood when the opportunity to settle on Nantucket Island arose.{D1}
In 1683 his wife Dionis was presented at Court for selling beer for 3 cents a quart. The law provided that inn keepers should always be provided with good wholesome beer of four bushels of malt to the hhd., to be sold at not above two cents a quart under a penalty of 40 shilings. It was proved on the testimony of
Samuel Mooers however that she had put six bushels of malt to the hhd. and was accordingly discharged because she had kept the proportion good, After this, Tristram returned to Salisbury and became a County Magistrate.

DEATH: Dionis survived her husband and died on Nantucket Island; however, accounts of her death place the date variably at 16 Oct 1676 and 6 Nov 1684.

DOCUMENTS:
1. Nantucket Lands and Land Owners, Vol. 2., Bulletin No.1., by Henry Barnard Worth, Published by the Nantucket Historical Assn., 1901.
Individual source: The Coffin Family by Louis Coffin, 1962, Nantucket Historical Society, Nantucket, MA.

 

https://4dtraveler.net/2011/08/14/tristram-coffin-dionis-stevens-nantucket-settlers/

portledge manor coffin manor england.jpg

Portledge Manor, The house sits on the edge of Bideford Bay, looking out over the Bristol Channel. The parish of Alwington, Devon, England and the surrounding area was given to the family by William the Conqueror, as part of a reward for loyalty and service during the Norman Conquest. Most of the current house dates from the 17th century, but parts of it have stood since the reign of King Henry III, circa 1234 .

Nantucket whalebone 2007

Nantucket whalebone 2007

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Tristram_Coffin_Medal

Tristram Coffin was the American progenitor of the Coffin Family who was also a co-owner/founder of Nantucket.

Tristram Coffin, Sr. was 1 of 8 original owners of Nantucket Island in 1659 for 2 beaver hats and 30 pounds sterling (coins). The 8 had purchased Nantucket from The Mayhews.

Trystram Coffin Sr.’s sister, Mary Coffin married Alexander Adams, who’s daughter Elizabeth Adams married William Parkman, parents of Reverend Ebenezer Parkman.

William Parkman (Elizabeth Adams & William Parkman, Mary Coffin & Alexander Adams,  are all 4 buried @ Copp’s Hill Cemetery in Boston).

Immigrant logo

Tristram Coffin, Sr., Mary Coffin Adams and Alexander Adams were both Immigrants from England:

https://www.geni.com/people/Mary-Adams/6000000005232467530

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8449256

1686   Oldest House and Mary Gardner Coffin
This portrait, attributed to the Pollard Limner, depicts Mary Gardner Coffin (1670-1767). Mary Gardner was born on Nantucket and married Jethro Coffin, grandson of Tristram, in 1686. Their home, built later that year, is still standing on Nantucket. Now known as the Oldest House, it is owned and operated by the Nantucket Historical Association. The Coffin/Gardner marriage symbolized the end of an early conflict in Nantucket society involving their families that was known as the “half-share revolt.” John Gardner and Tristram Coffin were key figures in Nantucket’s early governance. Coffin represented the “full-share” men, or original founders of Nantucket, while Gardner was one of a group of tradesmen who came to work on the island but received only half-shares. Bitter debates between the full-share and half-share parties raged on Nantucket about land rights, who could hold public office, and the future directions for the island. A tentative compromise between the two factions was reached in 1678, but it was not until Coffin’s death in 1681 and the eventual marriage of his grandson into the Gardner family that a full resolution of this conflict occurred.

http://www.nha.org/library/hn/HN-winter2000-timeline.htm

 

 

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knight

Sir Richard Coffin / Coffyn and Pedigree Charts from the years 1066 – 1101 :

https://www.geni.com/people/Sir-Richard-Coffyn/6000000010757581673

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Coffin of Devon 1291 1579 Knights of the Crown

A Coffin incident

Sir William Coffin (1495-1538) was a Devonshire courtier under King Henry VIII having joined the royal household in 1515 as a gentleman of the Privy Chamber.

Sir William Coffyn

That which Coffin became known for was an incident that occurred while he was traveling northwards to Derbyshire, and came by Bideford church and cemetery. In the cemetery there was a group of people standing around, not part of a ceremony of any kind so William Coffin stopped to find out what was happening. The situation was that a corpse had been brought to the church to be buried, along with the people who had come to gather for the ceremony, however the priest was refusing to perform the funeral. In payment for the priest to perform the burial rites they required payment from the deceased’s estate, and in this case it was the cow that belonged to the deceased man as he was poor, but the dead man’s friends would not give the cow up. After being told this William found the priest and ordered him to perform the funeral service as it was his job, but the priest still refused to do it without payment. At this, William ordered the people who were gathered there to grab the priest and put him into the hole that had been dug for the corpse and that dirt be thrown in on top of him. The priest continued in his refusal until the man was nearly fully buried in the earth when at last he conceded.

Such treatment of priests was not acceptable, even during the period of the Dissolution, and William would have expected to receive punishment for this incident, and even perhaps have been executed for such a crime against a man of God. King Henry VIII was informed of the incident and as a result William was summoned before Parliament. For anyone else this would not have ended well, anyone else would have ended up in the Tower or executed. However, Sir William had a number of friends in the House as well as at court and they were loyal to him and he avoided punishment. In fact, he turned it around and brought to Parliament’s attention the negative consequences of priests demanding payment (mortuaries) for church services. He drew the attention of the matter away from his personal actions onto the wider situation of the bad behaviour of clergymen. As a result of this, an Act was passed soon after which stopped practices including mortuaries.

Margaret Coffin Tomb 1539

Tomb of Margaret Coffin – 1539 +

His presence at court is first recorded when William attended the King in Guisnes in 1519 and took part in the tournament, and later at the Field of the Cloth of Gold in 1520.

In 1529 he became a Member of Parliament for Derbyshire, despite him being born in Devonshire, due to his wife Margaret Dymoke, daughter of the Hereditary Royal Champion Sir Robert Dymoke, having connections to that county; her first husband was Derbyshire man Sir Richard Vernon of Haddon Hall.
In 1533 William Coffin was the Master of the Horse at the coronation of Anne Boleyn and throughout her reign as queen, as well as that of Jane Seymour. He also became the steward of Queen Jane’s manors of Standon and Hitchin in Hertfordshire. In this office, on the 17th October 1357 William received the official surrender to the Crown of the Hitchin Priory from the Prior, as part of the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
On the 18th October 1357 William Coffin was knighted, however he did not get to enjoy this position for long as on the 8th December 1538 Sir William had died of the plague.
William and his wife had no surviving children, therefore his heirs were his wife Margaret and his nephews William Coffin the elder, William Coffin the younger and Richard Coffin. Margaret remarried again shortly after to Richard Manners in 1539.

Sir William Coffyn
St Mary’s Church, Standon

Sir William is buried in the church in Standon, commemorated by this inscription;

"Here lies William Coffin, Knight, sometime of the privy chamber with his sovereign Lord King Henry the eighth, Master of the Horse unto queen Jane the most lawful wife unto the aforesaid King Henry the eighth, and high steward of all the liberty [and] manor of Standon in the county of Hertford, which William deceased the eighth day of december Anno domini 1538, [in] the thirtieth year of the reign of King Henry the eighth"

http://cupboardworld.blogspot.com/2013_10_01_archive.html

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Sir Richard Coffin 1456 RichardCoffinArms_HeantonPunchardonChurch

Sir Richard Coffin 1456 – 1523

Details from Easter Sepulchre monument to Richard Coffin: left: arms of Coffin; right: entwined initials “RC”, two sets in spandrels of canopy

Sir Richard Coffin 1456 RichardCoffinEasterSepulchreHeantonPunchardon1

Easter Sepulchre monument to Richard Coffin (1456-1523) of Heanton Punchardon and Portledge, Alwington. North wall of chancel, Heanton Punchardon Church

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

RC initials for Sir Richard Coffin

Sir Richard Coffin 1456 – 1523

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Coffin_(1456-1523)

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Knight James Coffin 1551 800px-JamesCoffinBrassDetailMonkleighDevon

Sir James Coffin 1551 –  Detail of James Coffin monumental brass,[6] Monkleigh Church.

Knight James Coffin 1551 JamesCoffinMonumentMonkleighDevon

16th century mural monument to a kneeling knight, featuring heraldry of the Coffin family. Monkleigh Church, high up on north wall of chancel. Monumental brass depicting a bearded knight, said to represent James Coffin (d.1566)[6] kneeling in prayer, surrounded by heraldic escutcheons depicting the arms of Coffin: Azure, three bezants between eight crosses crosslet or

Knight James Coffin 1551 Coat of Arms CoffinArmsMonkleighChurchDevon

Arms of Coffin family, lords of the manor of Monkleigh: Azure, three bezants between eightcrosses crosslet or, and right as seen on 16th century Coffin mural monument in Monkleigh Church, with a crest of a bird of some variety

Jane Coffin 1646 JaneCoffyn1646_MonkleighChurchDevon

Inscribed slate mural monument to Jane Coffyn (d.1646), Monkleigh Church, west wall of north transept. Inscription: “Resurgimus” (we will rise again) “Jane the eldest childe of John Coffyn Esqr wife of Hugh Prust, gent, 13 Mons” “who w(i)th her chrisome son(n)e was buried nere this place the first of July 1646”.
“A mayde a wife in wife and right accord,
She liv’d she di’d true servant of the Lord.
Aetatis suae 27” (of her age 27). At the top is a heraldicescutcheon showing the arms of Prust impaling the arms of Coffyn.[nb 1]

Knight James Coffin 1551 Monkleigh_-_across_the_fields_-_geograph.org.uk_-_667182

The Manor of Monkleigh was a mediaeval manor centred on the village of Monkleigh in North Devon, England, situated 2 1/2 miles north-west of Great Torrington and 3 1/2 miles south-east of Bideford.

Descent of the manor

The Domesday Book of 1086 records Monkleigh as Lege, the ninth of the 79 holdings in Devon as tenant-in-chief, of Robert, Count of Mortain(c. 1031–1090) the half-brother of William the Conqueror. His tenant at Monkleigh was a certain Alured, modernised to Alfred. Before theNorman Conquest of 1066 it was held by the Saxon Ordulf, thought to represent the Anglo-Saxon name “Ordwulf”.[1]

During the reign of King Stephen (1135-1154) the manor of Monkleigh was granted by its then holder “Alfred the Butler”, together with his other estates of Frizenham (in the parish of Little Torrington.[2]) and Densham (in the parish of Woolfardisworthy[3]), to Montacute Priory.[4][5]

Coffin

 Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, a lease of the manor of Monkleigh was granted by the crown gratis on 26 August 1540 for the term of their lives to James Coffyn of Alwington and Anne his wife[7] It was valued at £21 11s 6d per annum, but unusually no charge was made for the grant. As is recorded in the text of the royal grant Anne was the widow of Sir George St Leger of Annery,[8] the chief estate within the manor of Monkleigh.

James Coffin was the second son of John Coffin of Portledge, in the parish of Alwington. He was still living in 1551 when he was mentioned in the will of his eldest brother Richard Coffin (d.1555) of Portledge. The Coffin family is one of the most ancient of Devon families. Tristram Risdon (d.1640) stated: “Alwington…the manor whereof hath been in the name of Coffin even from The Conquest“.[9]

On 11 June 1544 the crown granted the manor of Monkleigh, subject to the life interest of James Coffin and his wife, to Sir John Fulford of Dunsford and Humphrey Colles of Barton, Somerset, along with other grants of property. For Monkleigh manor they were charged £194 3s 4d, representing 10 years’ purchase of its annual value. They were also granted Monkleigh Woods for £29 13s 6d, representing 20 years’ purchase[10] Fulford and Coles paid the purchase price in full on 2 June 1544 and just one week later obtained royal licence to alienate to James Coffin of Alwington, the life tenant.[11]

A small monumental brass of a kneeling knight exists in Monkleigh Church high up on the north wall of the chancel, affixed to a stone tablet on which are sculpted several heraldic escutcheons of the arms of Coffin (Azure, three bezants between eight crosses crosslet or)[12] impaling arms of their heiresses. Pevsner suggests a date for the brass of 16th. century and that the stone tablet on which it is now affixed was originally part of a now lost 16th. century monument.[13]

The next member of the Coffin family recorded by the heraldic visitations of Devon to have a connection with Monkleigh Church is John Coffin (1593-1622) of Portledge. John was Richard Coffin’s great-grandson.[14] Three of John’s daughters were married in Monkleigh Church, between 1645 and 1657.[15] A mural monument exists in Monkleigh Church, in the north transept, to his eldest daughter Jane Coffin (1593-1646),[16] who in 1645, aged 26, married in Monkleigh Church to Hugh Prust[17] (1614-1650)[18] of Annery,[citation needed] within the parish of Monkleigh. She died the next year, as her mural monument records,[citation needed] and her husband died five years later without progeny,[19] when his heir to Annery became his younger brother Lt-Col.Joseph Prust (1620-1677) of Annery.”[20]

John Coffin’s son and heir was Richard Coffin (d.1700) of Portledge, Sheriff of Devon in 1683, who in 1648 married his third wife Dorothy Rowe in Monkleigh Church.[15] His son and heir by this third wife was John Coffin (1649-1704) of Portledge, who was baptised at Monkleigh. He left no progeny and eventually his heir became his heir became his great-nephew Rev. John Pine-Coffin (1735-1824), the grandson of his eldest sister Dorothy Coffin (b.1651) and her husband Edward Pyne of Eastdowne.[21][nb 2] Later in about 1823 his son and heir Richard Pine-Coffin (1770-1833)[23] sold some land in his manor of Monkleigh to John Rolle, 1st Baron Rolle (d.1842) for part of the course of the Rolle Canal between about the Ridd limekilns to the Beam Aqueduct, following the left-bank of the River Torridge.[24] Colonel Richard Geoffrey Pine-Coffin (1908-1974) DSO & Bar, MC, born at Portledge, was a parachute officer of the British Army during World War II. The Pine-Coffin family until recently still possessed the advowson of Alwington Church, making it one of the most ancient lineages in Devon, albeit more recently via a female line, although the mansion of Portledge was converted into a hotel some time before 1959[25]and the estate of Portledge was sold in 1998, due to a dispute with the Inland Revenue.[26]

Historic estates

Annery

Within the manor and parish of Monkleigh is located the former historic estate ofAnnery. The post-Dissolution lords of the manor of Monkleigh had their main residence elsewhere outside the parish at Portledge, Alwington,[27] and thus Annery was the most important seat within the manor and the successive holders of it had their own chapel within the parish church, at the east end of the south aisle, known as the “Annery Chapel”.[13]

 

http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Manor_of_Monkleigh

 

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Indians Kill Ancestor Casper Barger in 1755 on VA Tech Campus

March 8, 2009

casper barger 13 EarlyAmericanIndianWar.jpg

Casper Barger immigrated from Germany in 1738. Then in 1755 was killed by Indians at Draper’s Meadow Massacre on land now that is situated on the present day campus of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. At the time of the attack, the area had been populated by a group of around twenty settlers who were a mix of migrants fromPennsylvania of English and Germanic origin.[1] A marker commemorating the massacre is located near the Duck Pond on the Virginia Tech campus.

casper barger 7 dagger

A dagger and sheath found by Preston at the site of the Drapers Meadow massacre in July 1755 on display at Smithfield.

http://www.roanoke.com/news/museum-hop-locally/image_08e59959-9b33-5f2f-8894-df0fd5b177f6.html

Immigrant logo

 

Casper Barger 2.jpg

The Massacre

Rising tensions between the natives and western settlers were exacerbated by fighting in the French and Indian War and the encroachment on tribal hunting grounds. Recent victories by the French over the British, although north of Virginia, had left much of the frontier unprotected. In the summer of 1755 several settlements had been ravaged by the Indians. On July 9 a force of about 1300 British soldiers under the command of General Edward Braddock had been decisively defeated by French troops and Shawnees at the Battle of the Monongahela, which encouraged further violence against settlers in the region.

casper barger 14

On July 30 (see disagreement of sources about the date below) a group of Shawnee (then allies of the French) entered the sparsely populated camp virtually unimpeded and killed at least five people and wounded at least one person and burned the settlement.[4] Among the victims were Colonel James Patton, a neighbor (Caspar Barger), and two people in Mary Draper Ingles‘ family: her mother (Elenor Draper), and the baby of her sister-in-law (Bettie Robertson Draper), who (the baby) was killed by dashing its head against the wall of a cabin.[2][5] Other children in the settlement may have been killed in a similar way.[6] Colonel William Preston(Colonel Patton’s nephew) and John Draper (Bettie Draper’s husband, Mary’s brother) were not at the settlement at the time of the attack, as they were working on the field, and survived. William Ingles (Mary’s husband) was attacked and nearly killed but managed to flee into the forest.[7]

casper barger 15

One of the victims, Barger, was described as an old man and was decapitated by the Indians; they delivered his head in a bag to a neighbor, explaining that an acquaintance had arrived to visit.[8] Five (or possibly six) settlers were captured and taken back to Kentucky as captives to live among the tribe, including Mary Draper Ingles and her two sons, Thomas (4) and George (2).[1] Mary escaped at Big Bone, Kentucky, without her children, and made a journey of more than eight hundred miles (1300 km) across the Appalachian Mountains back to Draper’s Meadow.[9]

casper barger 16

Some sources state that Mary was pregnant when captured and gave birth to her daughter in captivity, and that she abandoned her baby when she decided to escape,[3][10][11] however there is evidence to the contrary.[2]

casper barger 17 indian-attack-log-cabin

The Aftermath

In the aftermath, Draper’s Meadow was abandoned – as was much of the frontier for the duration of the French and Indian War. William Preston, who had been in Draper’s Meadow on the morning of the attack but left on an errand and so was saved, eventually obtained the property, which became Smithfield Plantation and later Blacksburg. Out of the surviving family members, only the Bargers returned later to re-claim their land and settle.[12]

Survivors relocated in 1787 to Blockhouse Bottom near what is now East Point, Kentucky.[13] After her escape, Mary Draper Ingles reunited with her husband and in 1762 they established Ingles Ferry across the New River, along with a tavern and a blacksmith shop. Mary died there in 1815.

Mary’s son Thomas and sister-in-law Bettie were eventually ransomed from the Indians, but the others who were kidnapped at Draper’s Meadow died in captivity.

In July 1755, a small outpost in southwest Virginia, at the present day Blacksburg, was raided by a group of ShawneeIndian warriors, who killed at least five people including an infant child and captured five more.[1] The Indians traveled back with their hostages to a Shawnee village in Kentucky. One of the captives, Mary Draper Ingles later escaped and returned home on foot through the wilderness. Although many of the actual circumstances of the incident, including the date of the attack is uncertain, the event remains a dramatic and inspirational story in the history of Virginia.

The original 7,500 acre (30 km²) tract that became known as Draper’s Meadow was awarded sometime before 1737 by Governor Robert Dinwiddie to Colonel James Patton, an Irish sea captain turned land speculator.[3] This land was bordered by Tom’s Creek on the north, Stroubles Creek on the south and the Mississippi watershed (modern-day U.S. Route 460) on the east; it approached the New River on the west. The settlement was situated on the present day campus of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. At the time of the attack, the area had been populated by a group of around twenty settlers who were a mix of migrants fromPennsylvania of English and Germanic origin.[1] A marker commemorating the massacre is located near the Duck Pond on the Virginia Tech campus.

Historical accuracy

Except for a few scattered references to these events in contemporary reports and letters,[4] the primary sources are:

1) the 1824 written account by Colonel John Ingles[7] (son of Mary Ingles and William Ingles, born in 1766 after Mary’s return);
2) parts of an 1843 letter by Letitia Preston Floyd[3] (wife of Virginia Governor John Floyd and daughter of Colonel William Preston, a survivor of the Draper’s Meadow massacre).

There are some differences in the two narratives, suggesting that the Ingles and Preston families had developed distinct oral traditions. The disagreements between these original written sources include the date of the massacre (July 30 vs July 8, according to Ingles and Floyd, respectively), the number of casualties, the age of Mary Ingles’ children, and several other aspects.[2]

John Peter Hale (1824-1902), one of Mary Ingles’ great-grandsons, claimed to have interviewed Letitia Floyd and others who knew Mary Ingles personally, and his 1886 narrative contains numerous details not cited in any previous account.[10]

Popular culture[edit]

The story of Ingles’ ordeal has inspired a number of books, films, and living history programs, including the popular 1981 novel Follow the River by James Alexander Thom, a 1995 ABC television movie of the same name, and the 2004 film The Captives.

References

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b c “Drapers Meadow: Few traces remain of the site of a bloody 1755 Indian attack”. The Roanoke Times. Retrieved 2013-11-30.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Brown, Ellen A. (2012). “What Really Happened at Drapers Meadows? The Evolution of a Frontier Legend” (PDF). Virginia History Exchange. Retrieved1 December 2013.
  3. ^ Jump up to:a b c Letitia Preston Floyd, “Memoirs of Letitia Preston Floyd, written Feb. 22, 1843 to her son Benjamin Rush Floyd.”
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b “A Register of the Persons Who Have Been Either Killed, Wounded, or Taken Prisoners by the Enemy, in Augusta County, as also such as Have Made Their Escape,” in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. II, June 1895, published by the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Virginia.
  5. Jump up^ Kegly, Mary B. (1980). Early Adventures on the Western Waters . Vol. I: The New River of Virginia in Pioneer Days. 1745 – 1800. Orange, Virginia: Green Publishers. p. 352.
  6. Jump up^ William Cecil Pendleton, History of Tazewell County and Southwest Virginia: 1748-1920, W. C. Hill printing Company, 1920, p. 270.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b Transcript of John Ingles’ manuscript “The Narrative of Col. John Ingles Relating to Mary Ingles and the Escape from Big Bone Lick,” 1824.
  8. Jump up^ “Mary Ingles’ Escape Story Like ‘Thriller’ Fiction Tale”. Charleston Daily Mail, June 4, 1937. Retrieved 2007-11-14.
  9. Jump up^ James Duvall, “Mary Ingles and the Escape from Big Bone Lick,” Boone County Public Library, 2009.
  10. ^ Jump up to:a b John Peter Hale, Trans-Allegheny Pioneers: Historical Sketches of the First White Settlements West of the Alleghenies, 1886.
  11. Jump up^ Thomas D. Davis, “Pioneer physicians of Western Pennsylvania: the president’s address of the Medical Society of the State of Pennsylvania” Pennsylvania, 1901; pp. 20-21.
  12. Jump up^ “Historic Structure Report: History Narrative”. University Libraries, Virginia Tech. Archived from the original on 2003-05-05. Retrieved 2007-11-14.
  13. Jump up^ Federal Writers’ Project (1996). The WPA Guide to Kentucky. University Press of Kentucky. p. 240. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  14. Jump up^ Luther F. Addington, “Captivity of Mary Draper Ingles,” Historical “Sketches of Southwest Virginia, Southwest Virginia Historical Society, Publication No 2, 1967.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draper%27s_Meadow_massacre

 

Casper Barger 3.jpg

casper barger 11

casper barger 4

casper barger 8 Mary-Draper-Ingles

– See more at: http://blueridgecountry.com/archive/favorites/mary-draper-ingles/#sthash.8LriyVYL.dpuf

http://blueridgecountry.com/archive/favorites/mary-draper-ingles/

 

casper barger 5 mary draper ingles

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Draper_Ingles

 

Birth: 1708, Germany
Death: Jul., 1755
Augusta County
Virginia, USA

Casper Barger was born in 1708 in Germany, and died in July, 1755 in Augusta County, Virginia about the age of 47. His wife was Margaret –.Casper Berger, 30, was one of 139 males “ages from sixteen years and upwards Passengers on bd. ye Winter Gally, Edward Paynter, Commander [Qualified September 5, 1738].” Also on board were 113 women and children, for a total of 152 passengers. (German Pioneers to Pennsylvania, Passenger Ships’ Lists Includes People from the Palatine, List 52A, published at http://www.ristenbatt.com/genealogy/shplst26.htm)Alvan Lyell Barger, editor of The Barger Journal, A Publication Devoted to the Genealogy and History of the Bargers and Allied Kindred, wrote about Casper:”Casper Barger was born somewhere in the Palatinate provinces of Germany in the year 1708. He was thirty years of age when he sailed for America from Rotterdam, Holland, in the British ship Winter Galley, Captain Edward Paynter, master, and arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he took the English oath of allegiance, on September 5th, 1738. He settled in one of the eastern counties of Pennsylvania, whence he is supposed to have gone to the state of Virginia, to the Shenandoah Valley, and there acquired farm property at the Shenandoah River, near the village of McGaheysville.”His wife was Margaret —-. Indications are they were married in Germany. The next we hear of him is in the year 1755, when, with Philip Barger and Philip’s son Philip, he makes a trip to Montgomery County, southwest Virginia, where, at Tom’s Creek and New River, he had bought farm property. The purpose of the visit there was to make some improvements on the place, preparatory to moving his family there. Philip was, on the same occasion, making preparations to move his family to a farm he had purchased in the same community. The location was new and was designated by several names, as, Smithfield, Draper’s Meadows, New River, etc.”Several families had already located in the isolated spot, as the Ingles, Hermans, and others, but the population at the time, all told, was but a few dozens. This settlement was surprised and attacked by Indians on the 30th of July, 1755, and nearly wholly destroyed; and among the slain were Casper Barger and Philip Barger, Sr., the younger Philip having escaped the savages by an adroit manoeuver. . .”Of the members of Casper’s family, Chalkley’s Augusta County Records name Jacob and Casper, Jr. Were there other children?” (Edwards Brothers, Inc., Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1939, pp. 36-37)Mary B. Kegley and F. B. Kegley, authors of Early Adventurers On The Western Waters, Volume 1, The New River of Virginia in Pioneer Days 1745-1800, wrote:”Casper Barger (Barrier, Barriger, etc.) purchased 507 acres adjoining William Ingles and William Lippard in 1754 (Chalkley, Chronicles, III, 321). This tract was part of the 7,500 acres known as Draper. Barger was one of those killed by the Indians in the same raid that took the life of Colonel James Patton and others in 1755 (Chalkley, Chronicles, II, 510). His widow, Margaret, was made administrator of his estate which was recorded in 1760 (Chalkley, Chronicles, III, 59, 60). She bought lands on a branch of the Shenandoah River in 1765, and the deed was delivered to Casper Barrier, presumably her son, in 1769 (Chalkley, Chronicles, III, 426). There is no evidence that Margaret or Casper, Jr. came to New River.

According to the Virginia Military Records compact disk, Indian Wars in Augusta County, Virginia, p. 29, “The following is a copy of one of the collections of the late Lyman C. Draper, which are preserved by the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. As is well known, Dr. Draper was indefatigable in his researches. From 1835 to 1870, he traveled thousands of miles, visiting the residences of descendants of early settlers, and ransacking barrels, boxes, drawers and pigeonholes. He called this paper ‘The Preston Register,’ possibly because he attributed the authorship to Colonel William Preston. There are, however, some errors in the list, particularly in regard to names, which Colonel Preston would not have committed.

“The Secretary of the Wisconsin Historical Society writes that the original paper has the appearance of an ancient manuscript, and as far as he knows has never been printed.

“The number of people killed, wounded or captured by Indians, in Augusta County, from the beginning of the war till May, 1758, was, according to the Register, 307. Many more fell victims to Indian barbarity from May, 1758, to the fall of 1764, when the war ended. It must be remembered that Augusta county covered a much larger territory in 1754-8 than it does now. Monongalia, Holston River, New River and South Branch are remote from the present county limits. The Register fixes the dates and places of various occurrences of more or less historical interest, in regard to which tradition was silent or uncertain. July 8th, 1755, has heretofore been given as the day on which Colonel James Patton was killed and Mrs. Ingles (not English) and others captured; the Register, however, gives the date as July 30th.”

According to the same source, pp. 31-32, the following is “A Register of the Persons who have been either Killed, Wounded, or taken Prisoners by the Enemy, in Augusta County, as also such as have Made their Escape. . . 1755, July 30– Col. James Patton, New River, killed. Caspa Barrier, New River, killed. Mrs. Draper & one child, New River, killed. James Cuyll, New River, wounded. Mrs. English & her two children, New River, prisoners, escaped. Mrs. Draper, jr., New River, prisoner. Henry Leonard, New River, prisoner.”

Mary B. Kegley and F. B. Kegley, in their Early Adventures on the Western Waters, Volume, I, The New River of Virginia in Pioneer Days 1745-1800, state: “But Phillip (also Philip) Barger, the son of Margaret and Casper Sr. appeared to reclaim his father’s lands about 1771. . .” (Green Publishers, Inc., Orange, Virginia, p. 190)

On Nov 24, 1760, the inventory of the estate of Casper Barger was filed in Augusta County Will Book 2, pages 436-437. The index for Will Book 2 lists him as Casper Berriero’s, page 436:

“We the subscribers being first sworn before Tras. Tyler on of his Majesty Justices of the Pees have appraised the estate of Casper Barger decd as follows [shown in £, S, and d]

To 1 Red white faced Cow 1 15 –
To 1 Red Cow 32/6 To 1 Black Spoted Cow 27/ 2 19 –
To 1 Black Cow with the £1.10 to 1 brindled Cow £1/10 3 – –
To 1 Red haffer £1.5 To 1 Red – 1 Black hiffer £1.15 3 – –
To 1 with hiffer 16/6 to two brinbled steers £1.15 2 21 6
To 1 black hiffer10/ To 1 wieth steer 25/ To 1 brindled Cool 20/ 3 3 –
To four spring calf £1.10 To 1 Wagon ghind Geers & brest chain 12 10 –
To 1 even small schenes 10/ To 1 Lock Schenes 10/ 1 – –
To two Doung fork one hook and pitchfork – 8 –
To the frissens of One Dobletree 3/ To one pair of Shllands 10/ – 13 –
To 1 Tar and two small tae 6 – 6 6
To 6 Gimlet tree file two Compreses and one lamp – 3 6
To three Mattocks 12/ to five Oggers 7/6 – 19 6
To three faling Ax 13/ – 13 –
To 1 broad ax one hand ax one froshing ax one tomhawk and one froe 15 – –
To two fraing knife one foulaz and one hovel and one – 9 –
To tree viding how one spiad and 1 shofal and 1 smal hose 10 – –
To five Gressle 1 in shase & 1 nose – 4 6
To 1 Box Iron of ledel 1 pech fork 1 Settle pan – 4 6
To 2 platters & Basan 2 pounges 2 plads and one fonel 1 7 10
To 2 probs with their Cover 8/ to 1 Drace Cattle 3/ – 11 –
To 1 smoth bore gun 15/ to 2 Bells with the Coler 7/6 1 2 6
To 1 pane 1 blacking polane Southern & 1 Cane – 9 6
To one gridel 1 hakel & 1 pair of wool Cards – 12 6
To 1 gat 1 pair of Courds & 1 waggon cloath – 12 6
To two Couting nife & 1 Coury Comma – 3 6
To 2 sets of Plow iron two Clenishes and one Sing 2 2 6
To 1 tramble 5/ to 1 Bible & 1 Sarman Book £1 1 5 –
To 1 Chisl 5 to 1 pair of Moll Rings & two Vigges – 13 –
To 1 Table 10/ To 1 Courting knife with the Heel & Boult 8/ – 10 –
To five Bridles – 5 –
To two pair of hames with Iron tresses 1 Coller & 2 bridles 1 – –
To 1 black horse banded CB £4 To 1 black Rone Maer £6 10 – –
To 1 Red Rone horse 5 10 –
To one feather Bed two palow two sheets 1 10 –
To 1 feather Bed One palow one sheet 1 – –
To 1 Crad Cot & 1 per of Briches – 19 –
To one table Cloth and two hand towel – 5 –
In Cash 5 – –
——————-
71 13 10

George Trout
William Kerr
Geo Peterson

At a Court held for Augusta County November 24, 1760 This Inventory or appraisment of the Estate of Casper Barger decd being returned into Court is ordered to be Recorded. Teste –”

There is additional support for the theory that Philip (below, b. 1741) was the grandson of Philip who died in 1755. The German pattern of naming the first son after the paternal grandfather would have Casper’s firstborn named Philip. The second son (Casper) was named after the maternal grandfather (Margaret’s father).

Supposing the elder Philip Barger was Casper’s father, Casper Barger and Margaret — may have had the following children:

*i Philip, b. Sep 1, 1741, m. 1st, Eve Clements on Feb 4, 1765; 2nd, Barbara May on Mar 2, 1792, d. Aug 3, 1803
ii Casper, Jr., b. 1743
iii Jacob O., b. Oct 26, 1745, m. Elizabeth Hedrick, d. Aug 24, 1794
iv John B., b. Nov 11, 1746, m. Mary (Molly) — in 1776, d. 1831

Family links:
Children:
Philip Barger (1741 – 1803)*
Jacob Berrier Barger (1745 – 1794)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Unknown
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Larry Cornwell
Record added: Jan 27, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 33300030

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=33300030

https://www.myheritage.com/site-family-tree-370411831/parkman-genealogy?rootIndivudalID=2027908&familyTreeID=2

***********************************

John Brownlee & 3 year old son killed by Indians:

John Brownlee Meadowlane Farm.jpg

 

John Brownlee Meadowlane Farm 1

Birth: 1779
Pennsylvania, USA
Death: Jul. 13, 1782
Hannastown
Westmoreland County
Pennsylvania, USA

John Brownlee was the son of Capt. Joseph Brownlee and Elizabeth Guthrie. Joseph served in the Revolutionary War and was later an Indian fighter. While attending a wedding at Miller’s Blockhouse on July 13, 1782, Indians attacked. They burned Hannastown and took captives. When they found out Joseph Brownlee’s idenity, they killed him with a hatchet blow to the head. Not wanting any male Brownlees to survive, They murdered 3-year old John by swinging him by his ankles and smashing his head against a tree. Elizabeth and young John’s sister, 4-month old Jane was taken as prisoners. Read Elizabeth’s memorial for the rest of the story. Capt. Brownlee and little John were buried in a field of the Meckling Farm, the site of the wedding and Indian attack.

Elizabeth Guthrie was the wife of Capt. William Guthrie. They had 10-children. Elizabeth Guthrie gave an account of the burning of Hannastown on July 13, 1782 and her experiences as a captive of the Indians in her petition to the Pennsylvania State Legislature. Elizabeth was the daughter of John Guthrie & Jane Reed. Before her marriage to Capt. William Guthrie, she was married to Capt. Joseph Brownlee. In the attack by the Indians on Miller’s Blockhouse on July 13, 1782, the Indians killed Elizabeth’s first husband Capt. Brownlee and her three year old son John, and took her, her four month old daughter Jane, and several others prisoner.The Indians took them to Buffalo and to Niagra where Elizabeth was sold to British officers for $20.00. Jane was sold also for $10.00 and two gallons of rum. The British took the captives to Montreal as prisoners of war. They were there exchanged for British prisoners and returned to Hannastown, Pa. in July of 1783. Elizabeth married Capt. Guthrie there one year later in July of 1784. Daughter Jane grew up, married James Hugle and moved to Muskingum County, Ohio.
(SEE MY PAGE FOR CAPT. JOSEPH BROWNLEE FOR INFO ON HIS DEATH AT HANNASTOWN’S MILLER’S BLOCKHOUSE).
____________________________________

THANKS TO Al Haxton for the following information:

Meckling Farm grounds is now known as Meadowlane Farm. You might want to add this so people can find it.
____________________________________

Family links:
Parents:
Joseph Brownlee (____ – 1782)
Elizabeth Guthrie Brownlee Guthrie (____ – 1842)

Siblings:
Mary Wallace Simpson Guthrie (1741 – ____)**
John Brownlee (1779 – 1782)
James Guthrie (1786 – 1851)**
James Guthrie (1786 – 1851)**

*Calculated relationship
**Half-sibling

Note: THANKS TO Betty Rudolph of Boise, Idaho for the photo of the Brownlee grave.

Burial:
Meckling Farm Grounds
Hannastown
Westmoreland County
Pennsylvania, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Mr. Ed
Record added: Jul 17, 2014
Find A Grave Memorial# 132954819

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=132954819

 

Breck Family Tree

March 8, 2009

profile male generic

Thomas Breck

Birthdate: circa 1541
Birthplace: Canongate, Midlothian, Scotland
Death: Died 1641 in Ashton Under Lyne, Lancashire, , England
Immediate Family: Husband of Elizabeth Millar
Father of Robert Breck

https://www.geni.com/people/Thomas-Breck/6000000003017883496

***************

profile male generic

Robert Breck

Birthdate: 1565
Birthplace: Suffolk, Suffolk, , England
Death: Died 1630 in Lancastershire, England
Immediate Family: Son of Thomas Breck and Elizabeth Millar
Husband of Ann Hurst and Mary Fiske
Father of Edward Breck; Henry Breck; Robert Breck;Samuel Breck; Thomas Breck; and John Breck

https://www.geni.com/people/Robert-Breck/6000000002674699174

***********************

Immigrant logo

Edward Breck immigrated from Rainford, Prescot, Lancashire, England to Dorchester, MA, USA

profile male generic

Edward Breck

Birthdate: circa 1595
Birthplace: Rainford, Prescot, Lancashire, England
Death: Died November 2, 1662 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA
Immediate Family: Son of Robert Breck and Ann Hurst
Husband of Isabelle Breck and Unknown Maiden
Father of Mary Paul; Elizabeth Breck; Hannah Blake;John Breck; Susanna Breck; Daughter Breck; Robert Breck; Daughter Breck and Elinor Breck « less
Brother of Henry Breck; Robert Breck and Samuel Breck
Half brother of Thomas Breck and John Breck

https://www.geni.com/people/Edward-Breck/6000000003017883299

***********************

profile male generic

John Breck

Birthdate: October 27, 1650
Birthplace: Dorchester, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died February 17, 1691 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family: Son of Edward Breck and Isabelle Breck
Husband of Susanna Breck
Father of Jemina Blackman; Edward Breck, Ensign;Susanna Tolman; Elizabeth Butts; John Breck;Nathaniel Breck; Samuel Breck; Hannah Devotion;Rev. Robert Breck and Hannah Breck « less
Brother of Mary Paul; Elizabeth Breck; Hannah Blakeand Susanna Breck
Half brother of Daughter Breck; Robert Breck;Daughter Breck and Elinor Breck
Occupation: Military Captain

https://www.geni.com/people/John-Breck/6000000003075827193

*******************************

Reverend Robert Breck marlborough ma church father of Hannah Breck Parkman

Reverend Robert Breck grave Spring hill Cemetery Marlborough MA 5

Reverend Robert Breck

Birthdate: December 18, 1682
Death: Died January 6, 1731 in Marlboro, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family: Son of John Breck and Susanna Breck
Husband of Elizabeth Wainright
Father of Sarah Gott and Hannah Parkman
Brother of Jemina Blackman; Edward Breck, Ensign;Susanna Tolman; Elizabeth Butts; John Breck;Nathaniel Breck; Samuel Breck; Hannah Devotionand Hannah Breck

https://www.geni.com/people/Rev-Robert-Breck/6000000003422170376

***************

hannah-breck-parkman

Hannah Breck Parkman

Hannah Breck Parkman wedding slippers

Hannah Parkman (Breck)

Birthdate: July 25, 1713
Birthplace: Dorchester, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died August 20, 1801 in Westborough, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family: Daughter of Rev. Robert Breck and Elizabeth Wainright
Wife of Rev. Ebenezer Parkman
Mother of Elizabeth Parkman; William Parkman;Sarah Parkman; Susannah Parkman; Alexander Parkman; Breck Parkman; Samuel Parkman; John Parkman; Anna Sophia Brigham; Hannah Parkman;Elias Parkman and Robert Breck Parkman « less
Sister of Sarah Gott

https://www.geni.com/people/Hannah-Parkman/6000000020484940916

************************************************************************************

Hannah Breck Parkman wife of Reverend Ebenezer Parkman, Westborough, MA

rev-eb-parkmans-grave-westboro-ma_2.jpg

 

Reverend Ebenezer Parkman’s grave and those of his family lies across the cemetery from Westborough city hall.

rev-eb-parkmans-grave-westboro-ma_3.jpg

 

Here lies deposited the mortal of
the man of God, the Rev. Ebenezer
Parkman who was born Sept. 5th 1703;
ordained the First Bishop of the Church
in Westborough Oct. 28th, 1724, and died on
the 9th of December 1782 having
completed his 79th year of his age on
Sept. 16th and the 58th year of his
Ministry on Nov. 8th preceding.

He was formed by nature and education
to be an able minister of the new
testament and obtained grace to
be eminently faithful in the work of the
Lord. He was a firm friend to the faith,
order and constitution of the New
England churches.

He was a learned, pious good man and
full of the Holy Ghost and faith
unfeigned and answered St. Paul’s
description of a scripture bishop being
blameless, vigilant, sober, of good
behaviour, given to hospitality,
apt to teach.

Be thou faithful unto death and I will
give thee a crown of life says Christ.


The grave of Rev. Ebenezer Parkman located across from Westborough, Mass City Hall (1st pic). A plaque of the dedication of his tomb stone (2nd pic). Samuel Parkman, 3rd pic, son of Rev Eb Parkman. Samuel Parkman who owned 40,000 acres in Parkman, Ohio & 40,000 acres in Parkman, Maine & also gifted a Paul Revere bell to his Father, Rev. Ebenezer Parkman, that hung for 210 years in Westborough Mass. Churches. THIS PAUL REVERE BELL NOW HANGS (2011) IN THE OLD SOUTH MEETING HOUSE IN BOSTON MASS ON THE FREEDOM TRAIL WHERE THE BOSTON TEA PARTY STARTED ! Ironically, Samuel Parkman commissioned Gilbert Stuart to paint a life size portrait of George Washington (who Samuel resembles in this painting here) and his white horse in oil painting that hung in Faneuil Hall for 200 years and now is displayed @ The Boston Museum of Fine Arts (see other posts for more details).

For a glimpse at the Reverend Ebenezer Parkman’s Diary that he kept for 65 years (printed by the University Press of Virginia):

https://books.google.com/books?id=udV_8ntfbBUC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

#####

http://uscemeteries.blogspot.com/2011/08/ebenezer-parkman-westborough-ma.html/a>

#####

The Parkman Acadian Connection:

http://www.acadian-home.org/parkman-diaries.html/a>

######

Parkman Coat-of-Arms.

rev-eb-parkmans-diary-westboro-ma-public-library_4 (1)

 

THE DIARY

OF

Rev. Ebenezer Parkman,

OF WESTBOROUGH, MASS.,

For the months of February, March, April, October and November. 1737.
November and December of 1778, and the years of 1779 and 1780.

Hi.s motto was : — “Siiiciri/ns in Cordo I’st diilrts .\iiti-iciihi Sfiii’ditlis.

” Thy Heart is not right with God. Let me bear this saying in
mind that I may keep clear of such a charge upon me ! ”

HARRIETTE M. FORBES.
I)

PUBLISHED BY

THE WESTBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY
1899.

Uy^v

TWO COPIES RECEIVED.

Library of C«ngre«%
Qiiif Of tht

N0V1818W

V,.:::

copyright, 1899. by
-he Westborough Historical^ Society,

Fl’^r^T c

PREFACE.

In giving a part of Mr. Parkman’s Journal to the public, the West-
borough Historical Society feel that they are making a valuable con-
tribution to local New England History. It is not only a vivid
picture of their own town during the last century, but a type of all
New England towns, — the petty cares and economies, the small
jealousies and quarrels, and back of it all and broader than all, the
earnest, honest, God-fearing lives of those only a few generations
before us.

We especially feel indebted to Mrs. Edward Tuckerman, of Am-
herst, who lent us most willingly and kindly the manuscript
Journal. Miss Eliza S. Parkman, of Boston, has given us help
repeatedly in too many ways to be separatel}’ enumerated. Miss
Alice B. Gould, of Boston, lent the picture of Edmund Quincy —
Mrs. George Sumner, of Worcester, those of Rev. Mr. Sumner, of
Shrewsbury, and his house — Mr. Bradford Kingman, of Brookline,
the two blocks taken from Barbour’s Collections, Harvard College
and Eli Whitney’s house— Mr. Arthur B. Denny, of Chestnut Hill,
made the copies of Madam Parkman and of the Parkman Coat-of.
Arms — the latter from a water-color illumination which formerly
adorned the walls of the Westborough parsonage.

The extracts from the Natalitia are published through the
courtesy of the American Antiquarian Society.

rev-eb-parkmans-diary-westboro-ma-public-library_3

 

The drawing of Mr. Parkman on the cover is the only picture of
him known to be in existence. It was a niemor}- sketch, done with
pen and ink.

The photograph of the handsome old table which Elias brought
up from Cambridge is taken from the original now owned by Mr.
Parkman T. Denny, of Leicester, and coveted by all of the old min-
ister’s descendants. The slate top has been replaced by a board.

IV PREFACE.

but the handsome carving and Ijeautiful wood might well excite
the enthusiasm of a greater connoisseur in antique furniture than
Elias Parkman.

The Journal has been carefully copied, but for the sake of clear-
ness most of the abbreviations have been written out. Mr. Park-
man usually wrote they, yy — them, y'” — their, yeir^ and abbre-
viated many other common words. The italicized words have
been retained, except in the case of proper names — which he
always underscores. In a very few cases where the words were
illegible or blotted, an interrogation mark indicates the uncertainty.

The notes have been written mostly from town records or au-
thentic history, tradition very rarely being allowed a voice.

HARRIETT -M. FORBES.
Worcester, Mass., May 29, 1899.

INTRODUCTION.

The following pages are part of the Jourual of Rev. Ebenezer
Parkman. It is probable that he kept it for the whole period of
his long pastorate in Westborough. Much of it has been lost— that
for many years burned,— a few volumes are in the Library of the
Antiquarian Society in Worcester,— one at least in that of the Mas-
sachusetts Historical Society of Boston. This volume, w^iich the
Westborough Historical Society is enabled to print through the
kindness of Mrs. Edward Tuckerman, of Amherst, is owned l)y
her. It is all in one book, sewed together probably long after Rev.
Ebenezer’s death. Mrs. Tuckerman writes : “The book came to
me directly from my aunt, Mrs. Asa Rand, an older sister of my
father’s who received it from her mother Sarah, daughter of Rev.
Ebenezer. My good old aunt had more of her grandfather’s diary,
but in some of her movings (she was a minister’s wife), it got left
behind in a box of papers, on a closet shelf, she told me, and she
could not recover it, probably destroyed as waste paper.”


Copp’s Hill Cemetery is on The Freedom Trail – Boston

William Parkman Copp's Hill Cemetery Boston

William Parkman, Copp’s Hill, Boston, MA – Reverend Ebenezer Parkman’s father.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=13421979

Elizabeth Adams Parkman wife of William Parkman Copps Hill Boston 2

Elizabeth Adams Parkman, Copp’s Hill, Boston, MA – Reverend Ebenezer Parkman’s mother:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=13421979

 

Ebenezer Parkman was born in Boston, Sept. 5, 1703. His father
was Wm. Parkman, who in 1680 married Elizabeth Adams, also of
Boston. She is buried on Copp’s Hill— dying on the 13th of April,
1746. Wm. Parkman had died sixteen years earlier, Nov. 30, 1730.
He was born in Salem, where his father Elias had settled, in 1658.
This Elias, born in 1635, was also the son of Elias Parkman, who
had come among the earliest settlers to New England, and grand-
son of Thomas Parkman, of Sidmouth, Devon, England.

Ebenezer Parkman was admitted to Harvard College in 1717,
when he was fourteen years old, and graduated in 1721. The
next year he taught school in Newton, living with the brother Elias,
whom he mentions in the first part of the Journal. This brother

VI INTRODUCTION.

was a mastmaker, and in 1728 an advertisement appears in a local
paper : —

“April I. Mr. Henrj’ Richards wants to sell a parcel of likely negro boys
and one negro girl, arrived from Nevis, and were brought from Guinea. To be
seen at the house of Mr. Elias Parkman, mastmaker, at the North End.”

As the Rev. Ebenezer purchased a slave boy, Maro, in August of
that year, it is very possible that he vi^as one of this “parcel.”
Maro lived only a little more than a year at the Westborough par-
sonage, and Mr. Parkman writes under date of Dec. 6, 1728 : ” Dark
as it has been with us, it became much Darker abt ye Sun Setting.
The .Sun of Maro’s life Sat. The first Death in my Family! God,
enable me to see thy Sovereign mind and comport with his holy
Will.”

This brother Elias and his wife are both buried on Copp’s Hill,
dying in 1741 and 1746.

Mr. Parkman’s son Elias was undoubtedly named for this favorite
brother, and indeed most of his children bore the names of his
brothers and sisters— Mary, Elizabeth, William, Sarah, Susannah,
Alexander, Samuel, John, and Elias being names common to each.

rev-eb-parkman-bible-chapel-pulpit-westboro-ma_2

rev-eb-parkman-bible-chapel-pulpit-westboro-ma_3

rev-eb-parkman-bible-chapel-pulpit-westboro-ma_4

In 1723, Mr. Parkman commenced to preach, and twice during
that summer occupied the Westborough pulpit. In 1724, he and
the Rev. Jacob Eliot, of Boston, were nominated in a Town Meeting
as candidates for the position of Town Minister in Westborough,
and he, proving the successful candidate, was installed nine months
later, over the little church organized just before.

Those nine months had been very busy ones to the young man.
Only a month had passed since he had become twenty-one years of
age. He had built himself a house on the bleak hill-top where the
Lyman School now stands, and he had married a wife in July — Mary
Champney, of Cambridge.

The Church was organized in this new house of INIr. I’arktiian’s —
with twelve members besides the pastor. They were : Thomas For-
bush, John Pratt, Edmund Rice, Isaac Tomlin, John Fay, David
Maynard, Thomas Newton, James Bradish, David Brigham, Joseph
Wheeler, James Ball and Isaac Tomlin, Jr. It was five years before
the little church near the parsonage was finished.

INTRODUCTION.

Vll

” In the year 1729″ — so says the Book of Church Records, “A
Flaggon was sent the Church from a Friend of its Welfare at Boston.
See Zechariah 6, 14, latter part.


Communion Cup and Baptismal Basin

“In the year 1735, 10 sh. was given ye Church towards a Baptism
Bason, afterwards another 10 sh. was given by the same person, who
also Vjought ye Bason Dec, 1739, and devoted it to ye Qhh’s use.
N. B. A Frame for ye Bason with its shaft and vScrews, etc., price
20s., was given and Devoted by ye Same.”

The flagon and basin have been guarded from the destruction
which has overtaken nearly everything else connected with the
little church on the hill, and have found their way through the kind-
ness of Mr. John A. Fayerweather, into the collection of the His-
torical Society. They are both of pewter, and bring before our
eyes more vividly than any words could do, the simplicity and
poverty and sincerity of these first members of the Westborough
Church.

RAPTISM IT.Ar.OON AND BASON.

Vlll INTRODl’CTION.

In February, 1737, when we begin in the middle of an entry in the
minister’s Journal, he was living in his house on the Lyman School
Hill. His wife had died January 29, 1735. They (Mary Champney – 1st wife who later died) had the following
children : —

1.Mary, born vSepteniber 14, 1725.

2. Ebenezer, born August 20, 1727 — buried by his father’s side in
Memorial Cemetery.

3. Lydia, born Septeml)er 20, 1731, and died June 21, 1733.

4. Thomas, born July 3, 1729.

5. Lucy, born September 23, 1734.

Hannah Breck Parkman

 

Reverend Robert Breck First_Church_in_Marlborough_-_Marlborough,_MA_-_DSC04362.JPG

Reverend Robert Breck marlborough ma church father of Hannah Breck Parkman.jpg

Rev Robert Breck, 2nd Minister of First Church – Congregational – Marlborough, MA

Reverend Robert Breck, Marlborough, MA – father of Hannah Breck Parkman:

Robert Breck was a sort of rock star of his day.  He was a famous Congregational Minister. He was born on 7 December 1682 at Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts. His father was Captain John Breck and his mother was Susanna Clapp. His father was a selectman of Dorchester and known as a very “ingenious and worthy man.” Robert had 3 brothers and five sisters.  His father died in  February 1691 when Robert was only eight years old.

Robert was a scholar.  He graduated from Harvard College in 1700 at the age of eighteen. Four years later, in 1704, he was ordained as a Minister (“obtained license to preach”), first preaching at Newton. Long Island, New York. But he no doubt wished to return to Massachusetts so that in Oct 1704 he was ordained in Marlborough, Massachusetts and became the second minister at the First congregational church of Marlborough.  He served there for 26 years until his death on 26 Jan 1731, aged 48. hundreds flocked to his funeral and three different addresses were given all of which were published and can be read today. In those days, a Minister’s sermon was published and widely read.  Robert published two, an election sermon, 1728, and a “Sacramental Sermon” entitled, “The danger of Falling away after a Profession”, also 1728.

Robert Breck was known for being proficient in Hebrew and Greek.  It was said that he often read aloud to his family at breakfast from the Bible in the original Hebrew or Greek. Imagine the younger children sitting through that! Although he probably had a great delivery and translated for them as he went. He married Elizabeth Wainwright and they had six children, five girls and one son.  His son, Robert Breck, became a Minister as well.

He was held in such high regard by his parishioners and townspeople that when he lay gravely ill a day of fasting and prayer was observed in his church with special reference to his case.  Several ministers in the area  were on hand to conduct the service.

After his death, the Boston Weekly Journal, on 18 Jan 1731, wrote of him:

“As to his learning, there were few of his standing that even his equals; he was a master of the learned languages…His attainments in Philosophy, and especially in Mathematics, were above the common rate, in the study thereof, whenever he met any thing difficult or perplexed, his genius and close application son overcame it. He was well versed in History both civil and ecclesiastical, especially of our nation. His religion was vital and undisguised.  Pride, hypocrisy and affectation were his aver and covetousness was what he was a stranger to. His temper was grave and thoughtful, and, yet cheerful at times, especially with friends and acquaintances, and his conversation entertaining and agreeable.  In his conduct he was prudent and careful of his character, both a Minister and a Christian; rather sparing of speech, and more inclined to hear and learn from others.

http://manyplacesmanyfacesblog.blogspot.com/2014/08/52-ancestors-35-reverend-robert-breck.html

In the continuing celebration of the 350th Anniversary year of Marlborough’s First Church, the Marlborough Historical Society will present a talk on Marlborough’s first two Puritan ministers, Rev. William Brinsmead and Rev. Robert Breck. In those days the church was closely intertwined with town government, so this is the story of our early days.

Brinsmead and Breck were extraordinary men, scholarly, even tempered, and true leaders in a deeply divided Puritan town. They weathered constant land controversies, political differences, and military issues on a frontier town. The threat of Indian assault was made real when the town was invaded twice in the spring of 1676. In the succession of wars with France, the local population was victim of numerous Indian attacks and abductions. Through it all, Brinsmead and Breck were able to create stability and calm.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1580353525598871/

History of the Town of Marlborough by Charles Hudson (e-book):

Page 332 Breck Family Genealogy:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=loc.ark:/13960/t9377hm11;view=1up;seq=348

Breck mentioned in 22 pages in this book:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt/search?q1=breck;id=loc.ark%3A%2F13960%2Ft9377hm11;view=1up;seq=17;start=1;sz=10;page=search;orient=0

Parkman mentioned in 9 pages in this book:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt/search?q1=parkman&id=loc.ark%3A%2F13960%2Ft9377hm11&view=1up&seq=17

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=loc.ark:/13960/t9377hm11;view=1up;seq=7

Reverend Robert Breck Spring Hill Cemetery Marlborough MA

Marlborough Historical Society Peter Rice Homestead circa 1688 Marlborough MA

Marlborough Historical Society, Peter Brice Homestead circa 1688:

 

 

 

 

Reverend Robert Breck grave Spring Hill Cemetery Marlborough MA 2

Reverend Robert Breck grave Spring hill Cemetery Marlborough MA 5.jpg

 

Reverend Robert Breck, Spring Hill Cemetery, Marlborough, MA (father of Hannah Breck Parkman):

Birth: Dec. 7, 1682
Death: Jan. 6, 1731

Family links:
Parents:
John Breck (1651 – 1690)
Susannah Clapp Breck (1647 – 1711)

Spouse:
Elizabeth Wainwright Breck (1686 – 1736)

Children:
Elizabeth Breck Williams (1709 – 1728)*
Sarah Breck Gott (1711 – 1740)*
Hannah Breck Parkman (1716 – 1801)*

Siblings:
John Breck (____ – 1712)*
Jemima Breck Blackman (1672 – 1742)*
Elizabeth Breck Butt (1676 – 1743)*
Edward Breck (1677 – 1713)*
Robert Breck (1682 – 1731)
Hannah Breck Devotion (1686 – 1718)*

*Calculated relationship

Inscription:
very lengthy inscription

Note: Husband of Elizabeth Breck d. Jun 8, 1736, Was the second Minister of the Church in Marlborough / Source: Marlborough Inscriptions, Rice 1908, Sec 2:84

Burial:
Spring Hill Cemetery
Marlborough
Middlesex County
Massachusetts, USA

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=33189492

See page 80-82 for Rev Robert Breck’s tombstone inscription:

https://archive.org/stream/marlboroughmassa00rice#page/82/mode/2up

https://archive.org/stream/marlboroughmassa00rice#page/80/mode/2up

Reverend Robert Breck's tombstone inscription.jpg

Reverend Robert Breck's tombstone inscription 2

http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=18007

https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/attachment/u/0/?ui=2&ik=d0ae0957bf&view=att&th=1566261578550238&attid=0.1&disp=inline&realattid=f_irjv7jid0&safe=1&zw&saddbat=ANGjdJ8T9NXGdXRjUf9AD6lV-_KgNEn5tJiYJxL8XhCHTZ2cnjetdd3nhhZlrQJFrjd5CNf7-esOMeJ5JaKVNYmbj45sj8bNLx1vZ9gOfdksE_na_-rdi05PkcXLLcDG9KKrU8q-M4RpRKu_D1f2lZee5uDDdyU-8DloEoAX_XIwYYMWHtXYLPaj33WZUAo2LgDePBiVTH-DMUqFWZrynUPLMceS-EjQjTm1PO7YgA3yflnplasjNBliD9Fzd1jsFJ-RQ3XlipO6F8B9OG_WoOsAhQfFww7PwQJV47yrRQU9fHWyiU2ZWSY7LJC-9zJYjjAYFtsn_kFg1_wrKvglHKw1Jo8JK2nxCjBM1hsst8x9HrbIt9SomcJ4mwVLTx1Urcg8rPhxrtSt2i-_0_n94D-9x-4TtxWMc-nN_dYjIf8DChi1IAcK9JWU4okblcTAJmrOqorO9eEbq22ecie-qYHwJBCEdgGcA7hssp5E91OvcboI31p2Z8KR3EaklX4_eiEm3_0WVsrJRr6QgAD67oGBfzzbp499hDt_NX_JWXwGSrI0jSSntL4G2Fk5Xe3UwmiDfAwuM4gs9CgmyrT_06-YXv-2JD6gruI4Uoq49Sj-fP4Hg9HSt9s3ltKP-jaxiI0CvH7sIL0P0DNPVLD0

https://www.geni.com/people/Rev-Robert-Breck/6000000003422170376

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Annals_of_the_American_Pulpit_Volume_1.pdf

https://www.facebook.com/MarlboroughHistoricalSociety/

Minuteman statue 2

Captain John Breck Grandfather of Hannah Breack Parkman wife of Reverend Ebenezer Parkman 2.jpg

Captain John Breck Grandfather of Hannah Breck Parkman:

Birth: 1651
Dorchester
Suffolk County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Feb. 17, 1690
Dorchester
Suffolk County
Massachusetts, USA

NEHGR, Volume 2, 1848, p. 257:”John followed the business of a tanner, and was extensively engaged in various kinds of business, and was well known as Capt. John Breck. The neck of land now called Squantum belonged to him.”Ancestry of John Davis, Horace Davis, 1897:Capt. John Breck, of Dorchester, son of Edward. Born about 1651. A tanner; also other business. Married about 1671 Susanna; she was born in 1648; parentage unknown.
He is always called Captain; owned a cider-mill.
In 1680, built a vessel; was made a feoffee of school land; on committee to repair school-house.
In 1681, disciplined for voting in church meeting when he was not in full communion.
In 1682, widow Elizabeth Gray licensed to keep an ordinary, on condition that Breck shall see that it is kept according to law.
In 1683, on committee to lay out school land.
In 1686, Selectman.
In 1687, again on committee about school land.
In 1688, Selectman again.In 1690, admitted freeman; filed inventory of estate of Thomas Tolman, Senior; on committee to seat the people in the meetinghouse.
Will made 4 February, 1691-2; and he died 17 February, 1691-2; age, forty; leaving several young children. His will provides that “one of my sons be brought up to learning,” also “my children I will to be well educated.” His son Robert graduated at Harvard College, 1700, and became a minister.Family links:
Spouse:
Susannah Clapp Breck (1647 – 1711)*Children:
John Breck (____ – 1712)*
Jemima Breck Blackman (1672 – 1742)*
Elizabeth Breck Butt (1676 – 1743)*
Edward Breck (1677 – 1713)*
Robert Breck (1682 – 1731)*
Hannah Breck Devotion (1686 – 1718)**Calculated relationshipInscription:
Here Lieth Burie[d]
Ye Body of Cap’t
John Breck
Aged 40 Years
Departed this Life
Ye 17 day of
February
1690
Burial:
Dorchester North Burying Ground
Dorchester
Suffolk County
Massachusetts, USA

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=20741726

https://www.geni.com/people/John-Breck/6000000003075827193

 

Captain John Breck’s Great Great Grandfather Thomas Breck of Scotland:

https://www.geni.com/people/Thomas-Breck/6000000003017883496

 

Hannah Breck Parkman wife of Ebenezer Parkman headstone 2.jpg

Hannah Breck Parkman wife of Reverend Ebenezer Parkman, Westborough, MA

Birth: Feb. 10, 1716
Boston
Suffolk County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Aug. 20, 1801
Westborough
Worcester County
Massachusetts, USA

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=124461218

Mr. Parkman married again, Hannah Breck, September 11, 1737 —
and their children were : —

6. Elizabeth, born December 25, 1738— died January 14, 1739.

7. William, born February 19, 1741.

8. Sarah, born March 20, 1742.

9. Susannah, born March 13, 1744-

minuteman concord statue

sarcoin-2

Alexander Parkman – American Revolution Leiutenant & Minuteman – 1776
This grave of Alexander & Kezia Parkman is @ the Old Westmoreland Cemetery, Oneida County, NY.

10. Alexander, born February 17, 1746.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=parkman&GSfn=alexander&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=20630653&df=all&


Breck Parkman

11. Breck, born January 27, 1748.


Samuel Parkman (see other posts about Sam’s links to George Washington & Paul Revere)

12. Samuel, born August 22, 1751.

13. John, born July 21, 1753.

14. Anna Sophia, born October 18, 1755.

15. Hannah, born February 9, 175S— died in 1777— antl buried in
Memorial Cemeterj-.

16. Elias, born January 6, 1761.

Sixteen children in all (with both of Ebenezer Parkman’s wives), of whom only two children died in infancy.

https://books.google.com/books?id=udV_8ntfbBUC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

Parkman Westborough history:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.32044024077927;view=1up;seq=27

Reverend Ebenezer Parkman’s Diary (published by the University Press of Virginia) :

https://archive.org/details/diaryofrevebenez00park

Ebenezer Parkman grave Westborough MA.jpg

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=parkman&GSfn=ebenezer&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=21&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=124461101&df=all&

*****************

GENEALOGY OF THE BRECK FAMILY DESCENDED FROM EDWARD of DORCHESTER AND HIS BROTHERS IN AMERICA; WITH AN APPENDIX OF ADDITIONAL BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL MATTER, OBITUARY NOTICES, LETTERS AND ETC., AND AMORIAL BEARING A AND J COMPLETE INDEX. BY SAMUEL BRECK, U.S.A. OMAHA Ref.s Printing Company 1889:

Breck Family History from book @ Library of Congress 1889 with Immigrants from 1635:

https://archive.org/stream/genealogyofbreck00brec/genealogyofbreck00brec_djvu.txt

 

Deliverance Parkman House – Salem MA

March 8, 2009

deliverance parkman house salem.jpg

deliverance parkman house salem built 1670

deliverance parkman house salem former location essex-street-salem-c-1915

L.J. Bridgman sketch of the Deliverance Parkman House, individually and in stereo (NYPL Digital Collections); one block of Essex Street in 1915, long after the Parkman House was razed, to be replaced by the brick Greek Revival Shepard block, rear right.

A Storied Salem House

Over the several years that I’ve been writing this blog, I’ve been trying to ascertain both the history and the imagery of as many seventeenth-century Salem houses as possible in a rather sporadic manner. All the famous houses (the House of the Seven Gables, the Jonathan Corwin “Witch” House, the Pickering House) are easy: well-documented in terms of both literary and photographic evidence. Other houses–both those that still stand and those that are long-lost–are more elusive, so when I run into obstacles I leave them alone for a while. I’m interested in these houses for several reasons beyond basic appreciation: as an early modern English historian walking around this New English city the seventeenth-century structures are an accessible window into the past that I study, I’ve been rereading (and reading for the first time in many cases) Hawthorne over the past few years, and I like to imagine the Salem of his time, when there were far more standing first-period buildings, and lastly, I like photographs that show architectural and urban transition, and those that show leaning wooden multi-gabled buildings adjacent to stalwart stone multi-storied structures are particularly striking.

One very elusive house that I’ve been chasing for some time is (or was) the Deliverance Parkman House,  which was built near what is now the corner of North and Essex Streets (right across from the Witch House) around 1673 and taken down by 1835, according to Cousins’ and Riley’s Colonial Architecture of Salem: long enough for Hawthorne to see it, but not quite long enough for it to be photographed, so no striking contrast picture. Nevertheless, or perhaps because of this lack of realistic imagery, the house–or any remaining perception of it–is cast in a rather romantic light: Hawthorne refers to it twice (in his “Notes” and the short story “Peter Goldthwaite’s Treasure”) in relation to the practice of alchemy and buried treasure within: what could be more alluring than that? The only image that I can find of the Parkman House was made by Salem illustrator J.L. Bridgman about 1900–and clearly based on Hawthorne’s characterization. As in the case of the House of the Seven Gables, the Deliverance Parkman house seems to have inspired Nathaniel Hawthorne to “create” a storied house.

A Storied Salem House

deliverance parkman tombstone top.jpg

deliverance parkman tombstone.jpg

Inscription:
Here lyes Buried ye Body of Mr. Deliverance PARKMAN, Mercht., d. 15 Nov 1715, Aged 64 yrs, 3 mos, 12 dys

Birth: Aug. 3, 1651
Boston
Suffolk County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Nov. 15, 1715

Family links:
Parents:
Elias Parkman (1622 – 1662)
Bridget Parkman Eveleth

Spouses:
Susannah Clarke Gedney Parkman (____ – 1728)*
Mehitabel Parkman (1658 – 1684)*
Margaret Gardner Parkman (1664 – 1689)*

Children:
Deliverance Parkman (1686 – 1688)*
Samuell Parkman (1687 – 1688)*

*Calculated relationship

Inscription:
Here lyes Buried ye Body of Mr. Deliverance PARKMAN, Mercht., d. 15 Nov 1715, Aged 64 yrs, 3 mos, 12 dys

Burial:
Burying Point Cemetery
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA
Created by: Dan Silva
Record added: Dec 15, 2005
Find A Grave Memorial# 12685226

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=%2012685226

http://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/deliverance-parkman_37528648

deliverance parkman wife margaret tombstone.jpg

Inscription:
Here lyes Buried ye Body of Margaret, Wife to Deliverance PARKMAN, Aged 24 yrs, d. 25 Mar 1689

B

irth:

Jul. 14, 1664
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Mar. 25, 1689
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA

Family links:
Parents:
Samuel Gardner (1629 – ____)

Spouse:
Deliverance Parkman (1651 – 1715)

Children:
Deliverance Parkman (1686 – 1688)*
Samuell Parkman (1687 – 1688)*

Sibling:
Margaret Gardner Parkman (1664 – 1689)
Abel Gardner (1673 – 1739)*

*Calculated relationship

Inscription:
Here lyes Buried ye Body of Margaret, Wife to Deliverance PARKMAN, Aged 24 yrs, d. 25 Mar 1689

Burial:
Burying Point Cemetery
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA
Created by: Dan Silva
Record added: Dec 15, 2005
Find A Grave Memorial# 12685223

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=12685223

samuell parkman son of Deliverance and Margaret Parkman.jpg

Samuell Parkman son of Deliverance and Margaret Parkman

Birth: Jun. 24, 1687
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Sep. 20, 1688

13mons, child of Deliverance & MargeretFamily links:
Parents:
Deliverance Parkman (1651 – 1715)
Margaret Gardner Parkman (1664 – 1689)

Sibling:
Deliverance Parkman (1686 – 1688)*
Samuell Parkman (1687 – 1688)

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Burying Point Cemetery
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA
Maintained by: The Guardian
Originally Created by: Cynthia Kaley
Record added: Nov 29, 2003
Find A Grave Memorial# 8138183

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8138183

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Deliverance Parkman son of Deliverance and Margaret Parkman

Birth: 1686
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA
Death: Mar. 19, 1688

3yrs, child of Deliverance & MargeretFamily links:
Parents:
Deliverance Parkman (1651 – 1715)
Margaret Gardner Parkman (1664 – 1689)

Sibling:
Deliverance Parkman (1686 – 1688)
Samuell Parkman (1687 – 1688)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Burying Point Cemetery
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA
Maintained by: The Guardian
Originally Created by: Cynthia Kaley
Record added: Nov 29, 2003
Find A Grave Memorial# 8138177

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8138177


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