Parkman Coat-of-Arms, The Diary of Rev. Ebenezer Parkman Westborough, MA on Google Books & Amazon – University Press of Virginia (book)

January 9, 2010

Elias Parkman, American Progenitor’s Pedigree Chart and Family Groups link:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=oldmankew&id=I25537/a>


Circa 1730

http://books.google.com/books?id=LPYBArsF7dYC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q=&f=false

Harvard Alumnai Rev. Ebenezer Parkman 1730 Signature

January 9, 2010

For a glimpse at the Reverend Ebenezer Parkman’s Diary that he kept for 65 years (printed by the University Press of Virginia):

Rev. Ebenezer Parkman (1703-1782) wife Hannah Breck (her wedding slippers & their parsonage) sons Samuel & Breck Parkman (his Shop) nephew Robert Breck Parkman & Westborough, MA

January 9, 2010

Rev. Ebenezer Parkman 1703 – 1782

For a glimpse at the Reverend Ebenezer Parkman’s Diary that he kept for 65 years (printed by the University Press of Virginia):

http://archive.org/stream/diaryofrevebenez00park/diaryofrevebenez00park_djvu.txt/a>

Hannah Breck Parkman

Hannah Breck Parkman’s Wedding Shoes – Married 1737

Samuel Parkman (looks a lot like George Washington – likely painting by Gilbert Stuart that Samuel commissioned to paint George Washington standing in front of his white horse – see full size oil painting that now hangs in Boston Museum of Fine Art and prior to that in the Faneuil Hall – as posted further on in this blog)

http://www.concordlibrary.org/scollect/Fin_Aids/parkman.html/a>

Samuel Parkman’s Manse @ Bowdoin Square, Boston, Mass


Samuel Parkman’s Manse @ Bowdoin Square circa 1880 & built circa 1816 – Boston, Mass

Reverend Ebenezer Parkman Parsonage – Homestead – House – Home

Breck Parkman

Breck Parkman’s Shop

Nephew Robert Breck Parkman

Page from a Sermon of Rev. Ebenezer Parkman

Parkman Graves Site – Westborough, MA

Tribute to Rev. Ebenezer Parkman

The desk of Elias Parkman, son of Rev. Ebenezer Parkman


Reverend Ebenezer Parkman Church Communion Cup and Baptismal Basin kept @ the Westborough Historical Society along with the Wedding Dress of Hannah Breck Parkman (see link below)


Parkman Farm House (Westborough, Mass.) Scan number: 000420-0048. Parkman Farm House, June 4, 1892. (1892)

http://www.americanantiquarian.org/forbesnameindex.htm

http://westborough.patch.com/articles/image-gallery-historical-society-opens-doors-to-town-history#photo-5423929

Link about Parkman’s relationship with Acadians :

http://www.acadian-home.org/parkman-diaries.html

For a glimpse at the Reverend Ebenezer Parkman’s Diary that he kept for 65 years (printed by the University Press of Virginia):

Parkman House – 33 Beacon Street – Boston – Mayor’s Official Reception Hall

January 2, 2010

Parkman House - Boston - 33 Beacon Street

Parkman House - Boston - 33 Beacon Street

Here lived and died George Francis Parkman 1823-1908 Remembered with enduring gratitude by the City of Boston for his bequest ofa $5 million fund that secures for-ever the maintenance and improvement of the Boston Common and other public parks (Boston Common is America’s oldest Park founded in 1659). The Parkman House is next to the gold domed Boston State Capital Building.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Parkman


He was “Murdered at Harvard” and PBS made a documentary about it (link):

Parkman, Samuel & U.S. President George Washington @ Boston Museum of Fine Art – 1806

January 2, 2010

Samuel Parkman commissioned Gilbert Stuart to paint a full length oil portrait of U.S. President George Washington, which Samuel later gifted to the Town of Boston in 1806 where the painting hung in the Fanueil Hall and now in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. The painting by Gilbert Stuart is of George Washington ,in Dorchester Heights, full-length in uniform, standing by a white horse, holding his bridle in his left hand and his chapeau in his right.

http://books.google.com/books?id=QvkMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA12&lpg=PA12&dq=samuel+parkman,+boston+museum+of+fine+arts&source=bl&ots=jaxkhkLxJx&sig=h3Yc-WYm8l2towZ1r2V-hTj5HJA&hl=en&ei=EBrbSYiBFIOIyAXKp4TCCA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6

Samuel Parkman commissioned Gilbert Stuart to create this life sized oil painting than hung @ Faneuil Hall (see bottom right side painting) that now is on display @ The Boston Museum of Fine Art.


See this Video filmed @ Fanuel Hall in Boston where the George Washington Oil Painting by Gilbert Stuart hung at the time. (shame on Mitt Romney’s “liberal views”)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9IJUkYUbvI&feature=related

GILBERT STUART’S 1796 OIL PAINTING/PORTRAIT OF GEORGE WASHINGTON APPEARS ON EVERY US $1 DOLLAR BILL (SEE BOTH BELOW)

(see page 3 of this blog “Sarah Francis Lightner Brownlee” for other ties to George Washington & Thomas Jefferson mentioned below)



GEORGE WASHINGTON & THOMAS JEFFERSON LINKS TO NATURAL BRIDGE, VA:

Some believe George Washington came to the site in 1750 as a young surveyor on behalf of Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron.[4] To support claims that Washington surveyed the area, some tour guides claim the initials “G.W.” on the wall of the bridge, 23 ft. up, were carved by the future president. Legend also has it that George Washington threw a rock from the bottom of Cedar Creek over the bridge. In 1927, a large stone was found, also engraved “G.W.” and bearing a surveyor’s cross, which historians accepted as proof that he indeed surveyed the bridge.[5]


Thomas Jefferson purchased the bridge (@ Natural Bridge,VA) for $2.40 from King George III. He also built a cabin there while he was president.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_Bridge_(Virginia)


King George III

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_III_of_the_United_Kingdom

Parkman Sir Name arches over the Sacred Cod Fish – since 1747

January 2, 2010

codinchambersacredcod1

Sacred Cod Fish rests under the sir name of Parkman

The Sacred Cod is a carving of a codfish an Atlantic cod that rests in the chamber of the Massachusetts House of Representatives under the sir name of Parkman. The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the state legislature of the U.S….The Cod that currently hangs in the building is actually the third one to be carved. The first was destroyed in a fire in 1747, the second during the Revolutionary War. Alexander Parkman was a Lieutenant & Minute Man in the American Revolution as were several of his siblings & family.

The American Revolutionary War , also known as the American War of Independence, was a war between Kingdom of Great Britain and revolutionaries within 13 colonies, who United States Declaration of Independence as the United States in 1776…The current cod was crafted around 1784 by an unknown artist.

The Atlantic cod is a well-known seafood belonging to the family Gadidae. It grows to two metres in length…..It represents the importance of the fishing. Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish. By extension, the term fishing is also applied to hunting for other aquatic animals such as various types of shellfish as well as squid, octopus, turtles, Edible frog and some edible marine inverteb…industry in the early history of the state.

Cod are very abundant in the waters surrounding Massachusetts.

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is a U.S. state in the New England region of the Northeastern United States United States….and in 1974 it was chosen as the official state fish.

The Sacred Cod sculpture measures five feet long and is carved out of pine.

Pines are Pinophyta trees of the genus Pinus, in the family Pinaceae. There are about 115 species of pine, although different authors accept anything from 105 to 125 species…..

http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Sacred_Cod_of_Massachusetts

Parkman Bandstand – Boston Common – 1912

January 2, 2010

Parkman Bandstand - Boston Common

Parkman Bandstand - Boston Common


The Parkman Bandstand was named for one of the Common’s greatest benefactors, George Francis Parkman Jr., who died in 1908 and left $5 million for the care of the Common and other city parks. The bandstand was originally dedicated in 1912 and was restored in 1996. It still hosts small events such as midday concerts, theatrical productions, and occasional speeches.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Parkman

http://boston.about.com/od/walkingtours/ss/bcWalkingTour_3.htm

George Parkman was Murdered at Harvard and PBS made a documentary about it (link):

Parkman House – National Historic Landmark – Boston

January 2, 2010

Parkman House - National Historic Landmark - 50 Chestnut St.- Boston

Parkman House - National Historic Landmark - 50 Chestnut St.- Boston

Francis Parkman House is a National Historic Landmark at 50 Chestnut Street in Boston, Massachusetts.

The house was built in 1865 for Francis Parkman, a historian and horticulturalist, and the house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1966.[1

Gov Endicott Chub Peabody 1962-1964 – Mother Mary Parkman –

January 1, 2010


This oil painting hangs in the Governors Office in the gold domed Boston State Capital Building. It was front page news around the country on April 1, 1964 when the governor’s 72 year old mother, Mary Parkman Peabody, was arrested at the Ponce de Leon Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Florida for attempting to be served in an integrated group at a racially segregated restaurant. This made Mrs. Peabody a hero to the civil rights movement, and brought the efforts in St. Augustine—the nation’s oldest city—to national and international attention. The story of her arrest is told in many books including one by her arrest companion Hester Campbell, called Four for Freedom.

An All-American star defensive lineman for the Harvard football team, he was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. He was a grandson of the founder of the Groton School and Brooks School, also named Endicott Peabody. He ran for political office unsuccessfully in Massachusetts several times. In 1962 he was elected Governor, upsetting Republican Governor John Volpe by 4,431 votes out of over 2 million cast. He served a single two-year term, but in 1964, was defeated in the Democratic primary by Lieutenant Governor Francis X. Bellotti. In 1966 he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and lost by a wide margin to then-state Attorney General Edward Brooke. Also during the United States presidential election, 1960 he coordinated John F. Kennedy’s Presidential campaigns in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New Hampshire[1]

Mary Parkman Peabody – Civil Rights – 1964

January 1, 2010

<a The event that brought the civil rights movement in St. Augustine to international attention was the arrest of Mary Parkman Peabody (1891-1981), the 72-year old mother of the Governor of Massachusetts (Endicott (Chub) Peabody) , for trying to be served in a racially integrated group at the Ponce de Leon Motor Lodge on March 31, 1964.

The socially prominent Mrs. Peabody, whose husband was an Episcopal bishop, and who was related to Eleanor Roosevelt, stayed here at 177 Twine Street when she was not in the St. Johns County Jail. She was the guest of Mrs. Loucille Plummer (1924-1978) a nurse and civil rights activist.

Mrs. Plummer's house was the target of a firebombing attempt in 1965 because of her civil rights activities, but she did not let that dissuade her. According to Audrey Nell Edwards (one of the St. Augustine Four), Loucille Plummer "was a rock" in the cause of equal rights.

http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/1280-24/AP-Archive?esource=feed_google_video

BIOGRAPHY

Mary Parkman Peabody, the eldest of five children of Henry Parkman and Mary Frances (Parker) Parkman, was born on July 24, 1891, in Beverly, Massachusetts. She attended the Winsor School in Boston, Massachusetts, and Miss Porter’s School in Farmington, Connecticut. In 1912, after inheriting money from an uncle, she embarked on a trip around the world with two friends and a chaperone, traveling to India, Burma, Ceylon, China, Japan, and the Philippines. After returning, she took classes at Simmons College School of Social Work and in 1916, she married Malcolm Peabody, son of Fannie and Endicott Peabody, the founder of Groton School. They had five children: Mary, known as Marietta (1917-1991), Endicott (1920-1997), George (born 1922), Samuel (born 1925), and Malcolm, Jr. (born 1928).

The couple settled in Lawrence, Massachusetts, where Malcolm Peabody was first curate and then rector of Grace Episcopal Church. Shortly after the birth of their first child, Malcolm Peabody began service as a World War I chaplain in France. During his absence, Mary Peabody worked with the Women’s Liberty Loan committee, which encouraged women to buy Liberty Bonds to support the troops, and was active in community welfare projects. Malcolm Peabody returned to Lawrence in 1919, and in 1925 the Peabodys moved to Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania, where he served as rector of St. Paul’s Church; in 1938 he was elected bishop coadjutor of central New York and became bishop the following year. The Peabodys relocated first to Utica and then to Syracuse, New York. Mary Peabody taught religious classes for public school students in Syracuse and took in German and Austrian refugees during World War II. In 1960, Malcolm Peabody retired and the Peabodys moved again, to Cambridge, Massachusetts.

In 1964, at the age of 72, Mary Peabody was recruited by a member of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to join a civil rights demonstration in St. Augustine, Florida. She traveled with Hester Campbell, wife of the dean of the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Cambridge, Florence Rowe (mother-in-law of her son Malcolm), and Esther Burgess, wife of the first black Episcopal bishop in the United States. At the request of the demonstation’s leader, Dr. Robert Hayling, Peabody and her companions attempted to get service at local restaurants and hotels. They were refused and Peabody was arrested for participating in a sit-in at a segregated motel dining room; she spent two nights in jail, drawing praise from Martin Luther King, Jr. Her son Endicott was governor of Massachusetts at the time, and partly because of this, her arrest drew a great deal of press coverage and she received large amounts of mail both praising and condemning her actions.

Following her return to Cambridge, Peabody remained active in the civil rights struggle and made many public appearances. She also worked for the rights of American Indians and the establishment of a school in Roxbury, Massachusetts. Malcolm Peabody died in 1974 and Mary Peabody died of heart failure on February 6, 1981.


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